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January 10, 1982 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-10

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, January 10, 1982-Page 3

House battle continues
over Clean Air Act

WASHINGTON (AP) - The House
battle over auto emission standards
may come to a climax next month as
two influential congressmen butt
heads over whether the Clean Air Act
should be relaxed.
Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.),
chairman of the House Energy and
Commerce subcommittee on health and
the environment, says that when
Congress reconvenes in two weeks, he
will continue his fight against efforts to
ease auto pollutution standards.
But Rep. John Dingell (D- Mich.),
chairman of the full committee and one
of the auto industry's most outspoken
champions, say he will try to get Wax-
man's subcommittee to act on an in-
dustry backed bill..
DINGELL IS co-sponsor of the bill,
introduced by Rep. Thomas Luken (D-
Ohio). It would ease auto emission
standards.
The relaxation bill was introduced
just before Congress recessed for the
holidays and a couple of days after auto
industry executives met with House
Republican and Democatric leaders to

ask them to get moving on the
legislation.
Wasman opposes the bill and says he
believes data being compiled by the
Environmental Protection Agency
"will show ...that under proposals in-
cluded in that bill, there are areas of the
country that will have no hope of
meeting air quality standards."
THE BILL, supported by both the
auto industry and the United Auto
Workers, would double carbon
monoxide and nitrogen oxide emission
sthat would be permitted from
passenger autos.
The industry says reducing pollution
control equipment would cut the cost of
an automobile by $80 to $300, though it
has been vague on whether the savings
would be passed on to consumers. The
industry says thesavings could mean
TUESDAY LUNCI

increased sales of 300,000 cars a year.
The Dingell bill brought protests
from environmentalists, with the
Friends of the Earth calling it "a major
weakening of the Clean Air Act."
THE SENATE Environment and
Public Works Committee is expected to
vote near the end of this month on a
similar proposal by Sen. Steven Symms
(R-Idaho) to relax carbon monoxide
standards. But no senator has come
forward to support relaxation of the
nitrogen oxide standards.
Dingell said his bill "will protect air
quality" and its proposals already have
been subject to sufficient hearings
before Waxman's subcommittee.
Asked if he might bypas Waxman's
panel and bring the bill before the full:.
committee, Dingell replied, "I have not
yet addressed that possibility."
H-DISCUSSION

Daily Photo by KIM HILL

Braving the cold
Sue Peters cuts a fine figure at the West Park Ice Rink at the corner of Seventh and Miller Streets.

HAPPENINGS-
SUNDAY
HIGHLIGHT
The Michigan Theater presents Motor City Organ Society Concert, films
by independent Ann Arbor film makers and Jim Louden's "Ann Arbor and
the Space Age."
FILMS
ALT ACT- Wizards, 7, 8:30, 10 p.m., Charlotte's Web, 12:30 2:15, 4 p.m.,
MLB 4.
AAFC- Deep Throat, 7, 8:15, 9:20, 10:30 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Cinema Guild- Dr. Zhivago, 4, 8p.m., Lorch Hall.
Cinema II- Grand Illusion, 7 p.m., Rules of the Game, 9 p.m., Aud. A.,
Angell.
Michigan Theater- AA films, 3:30 p.m., Your Future In Space, 7:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Musical Society- Andre Watts, pianist, and Charles Treger, violinist, Hill
Aud.,4 p.m.,
Michigan Theater-John Lauter, organ recital, 10a.m.
MEETINGS
Gilbert & Sullivan Society- mass mtg., for spring show, Patience, 8 p.m.,
Peneleton room, Union.
GEO- GEO organizing committee meeting, All TAs and GSAs interested
in helping to organize their department or employing unit are urged to at-
tend, 4 p.m., Rm. C, Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Artworlds- workshops in oil painting and basic drawing, 1-2 p.m., 213 S.
Main St.
Center For Fine Woodworking and Craft Arts- open 3:30 p.m. to 11:30
p.m., hand tools class, 6-8 p.m., 537 Student Activities Bldg.
The Exhibit Museum- "Winter's Gems," planetarium show, 2, 3, 4p.m.
MONDAY
FILMS
CFT- Animal Crackers, 4, 7, 9 p.m. Michigan Theatre.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music- Faculty Violoncella Recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall, Organ
recital, 8 p.m. Hill, Piano recital series, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
MEETINGS
United Students For Christ- 7 p.m., Union.
Christian Science Organization- 7:15 p.m., Union, Rm. 3909.
Women's research club- Nadean Bishop, "Women In Theology," E.
Rackham Conf.Rm., 7:30p.m.
SACUA- President's Conf. Rm., Fleming Admin. Bldg., 1:15 p.m.
Women's Network- Emily Gardner & Betty Kaufman, "Comparable
Worth," noon, Rm. 4 and 5, League.
MISCELLANEOUS
Tau Beta Pi- Free tutoring, walk-in, 7-11 p.m., 307 Ugli and 2332 Bursley.
Hillel- Beit Midrash Course Registration, Judica, crafts, Women's
Studies, call 663-3336.
Physical Ed.- Adult Activity classes registration underway, call 764-1342
for more info.
Chemistry- Zack Gardlund, "Poly (Vinyl Chloride), Polyol Block
Copolymers, Synthesis, Characterization and Mechanical Properties," 4
p.m., 3005 Chem.
Center For Woodworking and Craft Arts- open 5-11:30 p.m.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT
NIGHTS
TheCollege of Literature, Science, and the Arts is currently

e ee
Meningts not a threat
to motashospital

JANUARY 12-12 NOON
"NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND NUCLEAR WAR"
Speaker: DR. MARTIN EINHORN
Associate Professor of Physics, U. of M.
At the INTERNATIONAL CENTER
603 E. MADISON STREET
Lunch $1.00 For additional information,
please call 662-5524
Co-sponsored by: The Ecumenical Campus Center, The International Center,
and Church Women United in Ann Arbor.

By DAN OBERROTMAN
Meningitis, the disease which killed a
University student this week, is very
rare and pses, little threat for the
general public, according to University
Hospital Information Officer Joseph
Owsley.
Twenty-one-year-old Gregg Ben-
jamins, a senior honors student, died
unexpectedly Wednesday of
minengococcal meningitis. He repor-
tedly had missed the first day of classes
because he did not feel well and colap
sed in the shower of the Chi Phi frater-
nity house that morning.
ONLY PEOPLE with a certain defect
in their immune systems are suspec-
tible to meningitis, Owsley said. Even
though the disease would not have been
harmful to moe poeple, anti-
meningitis drugs were administered
Wednesday to thoe who had come in
close contact with Benjamins, Owsley
said.
When a person contacts meningitis, a
systemwide infection occurs rapidly

and can, if not caught early, lead to
death, he said.
The main symptom of the disease is a
fever. "It is hard to identify. A person
might syspect he has the flu," Owsley
said, although he cautioned people not
to be overly concerned.
"THE QRGANISM (which causes
the disease) is present in the environ-
ment all of the time," Owsley said. In
fact, he added, up to 5 percent of the'
population may have the organism in
their blood streams at any time, with no
ill effects.
Meningitis can be spread through
respiratory secretions and is somewhat'
contagious. There is little change,
however, that even those who have had
direct personal contact with someone
who has meningitis will contract the
disease.
Rifampin, an antibiotic, can be ad-
ministered as a precautinary measure.
It is a strong drug with possible side ef-
fects, however, and is only given to
those who have had close contact with
someone who has the disease.

E
I
0
R
S

INTERVIEW NOW
GRADUATING IN MAY? Winter is the perfect time to
interview on campus for lobs or graduate/profession-
al school admissions.'
Explore this opportunity
"THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWING"
WHERE: MLB Aud. 4
WHEN: Thursday, January 14 4-5 p.m.
Everything you need to know about:
" On-campus recruiting policies & procedures
* How to fill out your CIF (Campus Interview Form)
" Signing-up for interview~
" Tips on writing resumes & career objectives
" Prepping up for your interview
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES

U,' _______ ______________________

-

W IN T E R SEASON

'82'

or i 0 ",o -

A&P employees confused
o s
by upcomng store closings

MUSIC GENIUS
J &"PR IME
-~ TIME"

(Continued from Page )
local headquarters in Detroit could not
be reached for comment.
Employees said the union had not
been much help. "They are worse than
the company," Burack said. Her com-
ment was echoed by' Chad Jozwick, a
bagger. "The union hasn't done much,
but there really isn't much they can
do," he said.
BOTH BURACK and Jozwick said
they thought business had been down in
their store in the past few years. Joz-
wick cited prices as a major factor.
"A&P is higher than other stores in the
area like Farmer Jack and Kroger."
An informal check of area super-
markets yesterday afternoon revealed
a significant difference in the numbers
of shoppers at A&P and its competitors.
Local Kroger and Farmer Jack stores
were packed, while the A&P stores
were uncrowded. The total number of
shoppers in all three A&P stores was
fewer than the number in any one
Kroger store.
Local A&P officials said business had
dropped substantially since news of the
shutdowns appeared in the media. "It's

destroyed our business," said Richard
Schairer, manager of the Maple Village
A&P. The store's bookkeeper, Peggy
Streight, said business was off at least
50 percent in the last few days.
MOST EMPLOYEES, however, were
reluctant to discuss the situation. Larry
Bendena, meat manager at the
Stadium Boulevard store, said he didn't
know if he would be transferred to
another store or wind up unemployed.
"The company keeps everything a
deep, dark secret," he said. "There are
probably lots of reasons that won't
come to the public view, but supposedly
the stores are being shut because they
aren't making money."
"I'd say more," Bendena added, "but
I have five kids at-home who want to eat
dinner, and I don't want to jeopardize
the month I've got left."
Several employees stated simply that
they would not talk to reporters. "No
comment," said one. "I want to keep
my job," said another. One cashier
said, "The manager told us not to talk
to reporters," then quickly disappeared
behind a door marked "employees
only."

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18
POWER CENTER, 8:00 P.M.
Tickets: All Seats $8.50
Reserved.
TICKETS GO ON SALE
TUESDAY AT 9:30 A.M.

"ONE STEP BEYOND OUTSIDE"
Tickets are available at the Michigan Union Box Office and all CTC outlets.
For more information call 763-6922.
STUDENTS:
HOW TO GET
THE BEST APARTMENT DEAL
IN TOWN!
($96.50/month* - that's cheaper than a dorm!)

WOMEN
Be part of a
New University tradition!
SING
with the U of M
WOMEN'S
CAl PP FCLUB

1.
2.
3.

Find a student friend.
Go to Windover.
See the spacious one
bedroom units with loads
of closet space.'

4. Tell this person about
the free racquet club
membership, clubhouse,
pool, lake, laundry room
in each building and
that i's on the city bus
line.

5. Save up to $400 (the
heat's free).
6. Sign up.
7. Congratulate yourselves.
You've found the best
apartment deal in town!
*Rent is $193/month. Split it, and
that's only $96.50/month.
Extended through January 15
Only during Windover's '% off, one
bedroom apartment sale. Hurry.
Windover Apartments
3089 Wooland Hills Dr._
971-2132
College ID
Rm&oo required.
New residents

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