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March 19, 1982 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-19

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 19, 1982-Page 7

Poet's

black humor

tt

intrigues the audience

Durable jazz performer Woody Shaw will perform tomorrow night at the
University Club.

Clubs/Bars
The Blind Pig (208 S. First; 996-
8555)
Dan Tapert and the Second
Avenue Band, featuring former MC-
5 guitarist Robert Gillespie, perform
original R&B, country and rock
tonight and tomorrow.
Joe's Star Lounge (109 N. Main;
665-JOES)
Tonight and tomorrow, Joe's
features the Blue Front Persuaders.

Mr. Flood's Party (120 W. Liberty;
996-2132)
The Urbations, one of the hottest
bands in town, perform tonight only.
Tomorrow night Flood's features the
Motown sound of the Falcons, fresh
i from their appearances at the First
Annual Rhythm and Blues Festival
at Second Chance.
Rick's American Cafe (611 Church;,
.996-2747)
Tonight is one of the last times to
see Steve Nardella before he heads
to L.A. to pursue the American
dream. I-Tal is still in town and will
perform Saturday night. Some of the
best reggae around.
Second Chance (516 E. Liberty;
994-5350)
Dr. Bop and the Headliners are
back (did they ever leave?). One of
the better bands to frequent the
Chance. '60s covers dominate their
repetoire.
Concerts
American Music Series
SFive area bands will be featured
at the Michigan Theatre on Sunday
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. The groups:
Non-fiction, a hot new local act who
play "modern rock;" John Voiles, a
fiery guitar virtuoso fronting a
powerful rock trio; Low Income
Zone, experimental jazz; Osmosis, a
young heavy metal band from
Saline; Jerry Brennan, electronic,
-.experimental music.
The Ark
Utah Phillips, the golden voice of
the Southwest, performs tonight and
tomorrow at the Ark, 1421 Hill
Street.
University Musical Society
After a decade, the Tokyo String

Quartet is firmly established as one
of the world's foremost ensembles.
Using a matched set of Amati in-
struments, they will play Mozart's
'Quartet No..21, K. 575," "A way a
lone," by Toro Takemitsu, com-
missioned by and premiered by the
Tokyo, and the "C minor Quartet" of
Brahms, 665-3717 for more infor-
mation about this March 20th per-
formance.
Eclipse Jazz
Durable jazz. trumpeter, cornetist,
flugelhornist, and composer Woody
Shaw is scheduled to perform at the
University Club tomorrow night.
For more information, call 763-5924.
Dance'
University of Michigan
Dance Company
The company will showcase four
original works by Dance Depar-
tment Faculty Susan Matheke,
Elizabeth Weill Bergmann, Vera L.
Embree, and guest artist Manuel
Alum. See article on page six. For
more information, call 764-0450.
Theater
Canterbury Loft
The Clown Conspiracy performs
You Can't Hurry Love through Sun-
day. You Can't hurry Love is a clown
show comprised of sixteen different
scenarios, featuring performers Joe
Killian and-Tanya Sadofyeva. See a
review of last night's performance
on page six.. 665-0606 for more in-
formation.
Professional Theatre Program
John Houseman's celebrated Acting
Company will perform Shakespeare's
comedy classic, Twelfth Night,
tonight only in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. Michael Langhan, former
director of the Guthrie Theater and
the Stratford Festival, and currently
the director of the Theater Center of
the Julliard School is directing this
production. The Acting Company is
the touring arm of the Kennedy Cen-
ter and has performed at the
Saratoga Festival. For more infor-
mation call 764-0450.
Miscellaneous
Major Events
The Chinese Circus of Taiwan will
perform next Tuesday, March 23, at
Hill Auditorium. The fast-moving
two hour spectacular of circus-cum-
ballet-cum-magic-cum-virtuoso ac-
robatics will display skills deep-
seated in the ancient traditions and
culture of the Far East.
-compiled by Michael Huget

By Carol Wierzbicki
R EADING AT East Quad's Ben-
zinger Library Tuesday night,
poet Jim Gustafson established himself
as a master of dialects, surreal
associations, and hilarious social com-
mentary. Gustafson's black humor in-
trigued and delighted the audience, and
though he often tripped over words, he
conveyed solid confidence and convic-
tion.
Bitter, hard-biting images abounded
in "The Idea of Detroit:"
Detroit means lovers buying match-
ing guns,
visitors taken on tours of the
foundries,
children being born with all their
teeth .. .
Street lingo, evangelistic jive, and
drinking songs were all vehicles for this
poet's extravagant imagery; his
thoughts seemed to fizzle off into
oblivion a moment after they were
begun:
Amazing ... that a deal can be
worked out so you leave the
house
empty, wasted, famished, method-
ically weighted
with anguish, and return with ten
dollars,
nine bottle caps, and the secret of
allegory.
In his books, Shameless and Bright
Eyes Talks Crazy to Rembrandt,
Gustafson often goes into a thousand
tangents, but this only makes the
poems more interesting; grand concep-
ts can explode and bloom into images
as small as a penny on a sidewalk.
Gustafson got his B.A. in English
from Wayne State University, and has
lived in San Francisco and Chicago. He
seems to identify with beat poets such
as Frank O'Hara and Gregory Corso,
which may account for the crazy coin-
cidences he creates: "Sometimes the
wonderful and ridiculous collide like
Bambi and a Snowmobile." Another
poem has a health-nut being poisoned
by bad lentil loaf.

Modern alienation was a theme
common to many of Gustafson's
poems; he spoke about how people
these days want the best of everything,
the best washer, TV set, reputation, and
"guaranteed excess". His somewhat
staggering vocabulary contrasted
sharply with his plain, truckdriver
voice, and his emotions ranged from
crying-in-the-beer self-pity to lofty con-
templation of the hollowness of existen-
ce.
Punctuating his off-beat, hip reading
style with fist-pounding, country and
western song-parody, and flip remarks,
Gustafson provided a hilarious and
satisfying evening's entertainment.

M1

i.M SchOOIOf Music
Dance
CompanY
arch 19-21
at the power
Tikets at PTP e
in the Michigan LeagUe
764-0450
With Sounlds f

aU

ROCK 8 d JaZZ

MELVIN SIMON PRODUCTIONS/ASTRAL BELLEVUE PATHE INC. Present BOB CLARK'S "PORKY'S"
KIM CATTRALL-SCOTT COLOMBY-KAKI HUNTER-ALEX KARRASas Te Sheif
SUSAN CLARK as Cher Forever xecutive Producers HAROLD GREENBERG and MELVIN SIMON
Produced by DON CARMODY and BOB CLARK Written and Directed by BOB CLARK
I RUSTRICTUD EEC MiY
I UNDER 17 NEp~EUIESACCDUPANYING C UVL'JY..0
PARENTOD D uR DIAN ( 5t. *O~OS rC~6U w ma~w err

..:a
:,

L

t . ,.....................

U I

DEATHTRAP
MICHAEL CAINE CHRISTOPHER REEVE
DYAN CANNON
The trap is set...
For a wickedly funny
who'll-do-it.

s-

in IRA LEVIN'S "DEATHTRAP"
Executive Producer JAY PRESSON ALLEN Associate Producer ALFRED de LIAGRE, JR.
Music by JOHNNY MANDEL Produced by BURTT HARRIS
Screenplay by JAY PRESSON ALLEN Based on the stage play by IRA LEVIN
. I . Ci~r- I~\/ I i M -T

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