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March 16, 1982 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-16

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SACUA fills three

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 16, 1982-Page 7
vacancies

By LOU FINTOR
Faculty government will have three new voices to
address University policy in light of yesterday's
Senate Assembly vote to fill upcoming vacancies on
the Senate Advisory Committee on University Af-
fairs.
SACUA, one of three faculty governing bodies,
nominates members for various faculty committees,
regularly consults with University administrators,
and acts on proposals before introducing them to

other University legislative bodies. The remaining
two bodies are the University Senate, consisting of all
faculty members, and the 65 faculty-member Senate
Assembly.
ELECTED FOR a three-year term, are Alphonse
Burdi, anatomy professor at the medical school, Mor-
ton Hilbert, professor in environmental and in-
dustrial health at the School of Public Health, and
History Prof. David Hollinger.
The three will fill vacancies created by Morton

Brown, professor of mathematics and current
SACUA chairman, Dr. Bruce Friedman, professor of
pathology at the medical school, and John Romani,
professor of health planning and administration in
the School of Public Health.
SACUA consists of nine voting members from the
Senate Assembly, one ex-officio member, and
secretary. Members will elect a new chairman to fill
a vacancy created by Brown within the next few
weeks.

Faculty dissatisfied with salary programs

(Continued from Page 1)

indicating "considerable dissatisfac-
tion with the present compensation
program" and a request that CESF
provide information on the costs and
benefits of faculty unionization.'
One question asked faculty members
whether they felt that salary
distribution was equitable in their par-
ticular unit. Teigen said of those who
said they received a zero to six percent

salary increase last year, 22 percent
said yes, 46 percent said no, and the
remainder said they "don't know." Of
those receiving more than a six percent
increase, 49 percent felt the distribution
was equitable, 27 percent said it was
not, and the remainder said they didn't
know.
ANOTHER question asked respon-
dants to write in how they night have
changed the distribution of the salary

budget within their schools or colleges
this year. Teigen said that of 430
responses, 82 percent were negative or
"critical" of last year's salary in-
crements, while 13 percent were
neutral or "ambivalent."
On unionization and questions asking
whether a stronger faculty voice was
needed, Teigen said that "the less
(money) people got, the more they
wanted a greater activist role."

Teigen said the responses indicated
that faculty members desire CESF to
take a more active role in determining
salaries.
"IT IS NOT totally clear to me how
we plan to do that," said Teigen, He
said in the coming weeks, CESF will
update the report and prepare several
reports on faculty fringe benefits and
other areas of faculty interest.

Senate Assembly requests
clearer hazing policy

(Continued from Page 1)
will ask that the policy be sent back to
the Senate Advisory Committee on
Univesity Affairs, which earlier ap-
proved the policy "in principle,"so that
the committee can rewrite all that
follows the first sentence.
BUT THE backers of the original
draft of the policy said the Senate
Assembly has seriously set back the
policy by amending it so that it must be
rewritten. "By amending it, they killed
it," said Virginia Nordby, the Univer-
sity's director of affirmitive action,
who helped to draft the proposed policy.
She said the policy will need the sup-
port of at least three major University.
groups before it will be approved by the
Regents. The policy has already won
the approval of the Michigan Student
Addembly and the University Council,
a previously dormant student-faculty
committee. But the effective rejection
of the policy by the Senate Assembly
could prevent student government
leaders from presenting the policy to
the Regents before the end of the winter
term as they had planned, Nordby said.
MSA VICE President Amy Har-
tmann, who has worked closely on the
policy and who planned to present the
policy to the Regents Thursday, said
she was. disappointed with the Senate
Assembly's decision. "They object to it
(the policy) being vague, but then they
make it even more vague," she said, by
voting' not to approve the policy's
definition of hazing.
MSA, working independently of the
University's proposed policy, has
required that some student groups it of-
ficially recognizes submit a list of san-
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ctions that they will impose against
members who are involved in hazings.
Major fraternity and sorority groups,
like the Pan-Hellenic Association and
the Inter-Fraternity Council, have
already submitted proposed sanctions
toMSA.
The proposed University policy states
only that the University "will impose
appropriate sanctions to violators."
MSA has also endorsed the policy,
and has agreed to revoke its recognition
of any organization that violates the
policy, which would take away a
group's rights to office space, free
meeting facilities in the Union, or MSA
financial support.
The Interfraternity Council has
already decided to bar hazing violators
from rush and Greek Week activities.
Pan Hellenic Association President
Janine Brown said that while the
association cannot discipline sororities
for hazing violations, it will notify a
sorority's national organization of any
hazing infractions.

Have you been thinking
about concentrating in
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES?
Prospective concentrators in Biology, Botany, Cellu-
lar and Molecular Biology, and Microbiology are
cordially invited to an informational meeting spon-
sored by the Division of Biological Sciences on
Wednesday, March 17, 3:00 p.m., 3082 Natural
Science Building.

JOGI ee
wren'
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body iq \14\ the

TONIGHT
8 P.M.
A Reading by
JIM GUSTAFSON
Benzinger Library
East Quad

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A second University student has been
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tile as he left the Union's southeast side
entrance late Friday night.
One day earlier an 18-year-old
University student had been shot in the
Sleg, apparently by a BB gun, as he
walked down the 500 block of Madison.
Neither student suffered serious in-
jury.

g object
After the first incident police with a
search warrant entered the Sigma Chi
fraternity, at 548 S. State next to the
Union, and searched an upstairs
bedroom. Although police would not
comment on the incident, members of the
fraternity, contacted after the search,
said police found no BB gun or other
evidence and left. They said police
agree to pay for repairs to a bedroom
door which they reportedly kicked in
during the search.

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