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March 14, 1982 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-14

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 14, 1982-Page 3

HAPPENINGS;

King fund raises record amount

t

SUNDAY

'CHIGHLIGHTS
"The Clown Conspiracy", a well-known and respected New York ensem-
ble, will hold a "clowning workshop" today at 2 p.m., and a performance
from their repertoire at 8 p.m., in the East Quad auditorium. Both are free of
charge.
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Nine Months, 7 p.m., MLB 4.
e Cinema Guild-Ann Arbor Film Festival, 7, 9 & 11 p.m., Michigan
Theatre..
MEETINGS
East Quad Chess Club-wine, cheese & chess meeting, 2:30 p.m., Greene
Lounge, East Quad.
Friends Meeting House-"Are You Ready For Intentional Community or
Other Forms of Cooperation?" 11:30 a.m., 1420 Hill St.
SPEAKERS
Russian & East European Studies-Alfred Meyer, "The East European
Roots of Euro-Communism," 2 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
School of Music-William Malmk, "Mysterious Winds of the Far East," 3
p.m., Stearns Bldg., North Campus.
School of Music-Ivan Vandor, "Tibetan Religious Musical Instruments,"
Stearns Lecture and Concert Series, 3 p.m., Stearns Bldg., North Campus.
Kelsey Museum-Gallery Talk, Andrea Berlin, 2 p.m., Kelsey Museum.
PERFORMANCES
Major Events-Hall & Oates, 8p.m., Hill Auditorium.E
Academy for the Study & Performance of Early Music-Paul O'Dette,
Lutenist, 4 p.m., First Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw Ave.
School of Music-Piano Recital by doctoral students, 2 p.m.; Violin
Recital, Nancie Shaw, 4 p.m., Piano Recital, Anne Royer, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall.
Ark-Pena at the Ark, "Taller Cultural Latinoamericano de Toronto",
3:30 p.m.; Biza Sompa and the Bichinis Bia Congo Dance Co., 8 p.m., 1421
Hill.
Students of Choice-Benefit Concert, "Boogie for Choice,"8:30 p.m., Joe's
Star Lounge, 109 N. Main.
Canterbury Loft-"The Indian Wants the Bronx," by Israel Horovitz, 3
p.m.; Homegrown Women's Music Series, 7 p.m., 332 S. State.
Second Sunday-Concert, Greg Yassick, 10 a.m., Michigan Theatre.
MISCELLANEOUS
Graduate Women's Network-potluck brunch & discussion, "Women
Writing Dissertations," 12-2 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe St.
School of Musiic-Conference on Women in Music, Rackham Building.
Hillel-Meekreh, Deli Dinner, 6:15 p.m., Markley Concourse Lounge;
Israeli Dancing, 7-10 p.m., Markley North Pit.
Recreational Sports-Family Sunday Funday, 2-4 p.m., NCRB.
Woodworking Workshops-"Introduction to Carving," 6-9 p.m., 537 SAB.
Alice Lloyd Pilot Program-"Hunger & the Third World": includes a film
entitled Development Without Tears, and a speaker, Richard Seelig, 9 p.m.,
Alice Lloyd Red Lounge.

By GARY SCHMITZ
Ending a lengthy trend toward low
donations to the Martin Luther King
Scholarship fund, the Black Graduates
of the University Alumni Association
this year raised a record $62,700 -
more than $12,000 higher than their
goal.
The first scholarships will be awar-
ded later this spring to "highly
qualified freshmen with financial
need," according to Robert Holmes, the
University's director of special
academic services.
THE KING Scholarship Fund, star-
ted in 1968, "has been dormant for a
long time," according to Reginald Er-
nst, leader of the fundraising. "We
wanted to resurrect it, to fulfill the
dream."
The idea of revitalizing the King
Scholarship Fund grew from Black
Graduates' reunions of the past five
years, according to Yolanda Shannon,
chairwoman of the 1981 Black
Graduates Reunion Committee. "We

wanted to do something for the studen-
ts, so we set up a scholarship commit-
tee to look into the possibility of reac-
tivating the fund."
The committee's work produced a
six-week fundraising blitz netting
$62,777 in cash and pledges. "We star-
ted the drive last fall, and focused on a
personal campaign," Shannon ex-
plained. "Most of the graduates that
did the fundraising knew the people
they were contacting and we were very
successful this way."
SPECIAL Services Director Homes
is part of the seven-member awards
committee, which will meet March 24 to
discuss the number and dollar amount
of scholarships. The scholarships could
be as high as $1,000 each, according to
Holmes, but "the amount could fluc-
tuate, since the awards will be partially
based on financial need."
The committee must also decide the
criteria for applicants. Students with
financial need will receive priority, but
there will be other considerations, ac-

cording to Dave Robinson, assistant
director of admissions and a member of
the awards committee.
"The applicants will be required to
write a statement, telling us whep they
feel they need and deserve the scholar-
ship," he said. "They will also be asked
to write a short essay on why they feel
minorities should seek a higher
education."
Committee members also said funds
will be available to students who need

emergency financial aid. Robinson
noted that the Alumni Association
probably would administer such a
program. "They've got quite a bit of
experience in that area," he said.
The success of this year's drive has
ignited hopes that the program can be
expanded. "We're certainly not going
to limit this," said organizer Ernst.
"This is the beginning of something
that will grow and perpetuate."

1 Fl {
w \"j

Feel Isolated?
Left Out?

I

1-informed?

Local resistance to
registration remains
strong, advisers say

Read the Daily
for the latest
News, Information
and Happenings.

__ _

By SUSAN SHARON
In spite of threats of prosecution and
stern penalties - up to five years in
prison and/or a $10,000 fine - many
men between the ages of 18 and 21
haven't shown up to register for the
draft.
"I don't care what the government
threatens to do" said Ypsilanti resident
Mark Kukla, 18. "There's no way I'm
going to sign my life away."
ALTHOUGH authorities have not
served any indictments against
violators of the March 1 registration
deadline, "It's just a matter of time,"
according to Naomi Thier, a draft
counselor for the Draft Action Commit-
tee in Washington.
"The chance of prosecution depends
on how public the individual is," Thier
claimed. So far, the Justice Depar-
tment has singled oat151 highly visible
resistors for action. "There is a
political conspiracy against them,"
Thier claimed. "They are being used
as scapegoats."
Draft counselors like Thier adlvise
men required to register of their options
and the consequences of their decisions.
"IF ONE opposes American foreign
policy and doesn't wish to condone it,
the best route is to silently refuse," said
Alex Reyes, counselor for the National
Resistance Committee. "But if their
conscience moves them to state their
reasons, we will help them avoid the in-
creased threat of prosecution."
According to Reyes, most non-
registrants are apolitical, and don't
voice their objections publicly. "The
act itself is not a reactionof political

beliefs, but personal ones," he said.
Ignoring registration, however, is a
political protest in itself, he added.
CURRENT estimates of the number
of resistors range from 927,000 to as
high as one million. Such vast numbers
make it nearly impossible for the
government to enforce legal penalties,
counselors claim. They point out that
there are only 30,000 cells available in
U.S. prisons.
But members of the various anti-
draft and anti-registration movements
say they are ready to mobilize once the
indictments begin. "Any attempt by the
government to proceed with trials of
the resistors wil be met by large com-
munity support by the non-
registrants," said Mary Roth, a coun-
selor for Ann Arbor's Draft, GI, and
Veterans Counseling Center.
LOCAL AND national protest groups
plan to combine their forces for an-
ti -draft efforts. "Registration is a clear
admission of a prelude to draft induc-
tion," said Marc Mauer, a member of
the American Friends Service Commit-
tee. "Unprecedented amount of
resistance is a means of telling the
government, 'No way.' "
Rallies, teach-ins, and campaigns to
local district attorneys offices are
possible tactics, according to Mauer.
"SELECTIVE Service is running
scared," Roth claimed.
"All the current talk abut the just-
expired grace period was a way for the
government to give itself a breather
period before they make fools of them-
selves," she said.

d.C.A.T. MidTerms
State Boards
L.S.A.T.
Aptitude Tests
SA.T.
Final Exam
ar BExam
G.R.E.
DO THESE.
WORDS AND
LETTERS
MAKE YOU
CRINGE?

If so, attend a TEST
SUCCESS SEMINAR and
find out how the safe,
effective method of
hypnosis can help you-
increase: concentration,
memory, recall, confidence,
test scores, mental control,
and relaxation; decrease:
test anxiety, stress.
Conducted by TERRI WHITE
RN, MS. Hypnotherapist

PLACE: UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
N. University & Fletcher
3rd Floor
DATE: March IS OR
.April 14
TIME: 7:00-8:30 p.m.
FEE: $18.00
$2 OFF WITH THIS AD
(Register in advance or at the door.)
PHONE: 668-8843
(For information)
FREE CASSETTE
FOR REINFORCEMENT

I

PLAY
UNIVERSITY PASSWORD
s'

a

MONDAY

HIGHLIVHT
- .
CI2W continues t ir paee of the Month Program. This month's topic is
Opportunities in Management. Fron7 t9 p.m., CEW will be holding infor-
mal talks with women working in or preparing for careers in management at
the CEWLibrary.
FILMS
Cinema Gui'd-Middle Eastern Film Series, Jamilya, 7 p.m., Lorch Hall.
PERFORMANCES
Guild House-Poetry Readings by Muhammad Scalleh and Judith Mc-
Combs, 8 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Halfway Inn-"Poems to Dance To," poetry by Sanford Lewis, 10 p.m.,
Halfway Inn, East Quad.
School of Music-Jazz Band, Edward Smith, conductor, 8 p.m., Rackham;
Piano Recital, Mariko Sato, MM, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; Harpsichordists per-
forming the works of bach, Couperin, Frescobaldi, Sweelinck, Rameau &
Handel, 8p.m.,Rackham Assembly Hall.
SPEAKERS
Prod. in Comparative Lit.-Galway Kinnell, "The Failure of Tran-
slation," 4:10 p.m., East Conference Room, Rackham.
Near Eastern & North African Studies-Brown Bag, Hani Fakhouri, "Fif-
teen Years of Continuous Change in an Egyptian Village in the Cairo Gover-
norate," noon, Lane Hall Commons.
MEETINGS
SACUA-1:15 p.m., West Alcove, Rackham.
Senate Assembly-3:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Christian Science Organization-7:15 p.m., rm. 3909, Union.
United Students for Christ-6 p.m., Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Tau Beta Pi-Free tutoring for students in lower level math and science
courses, walk-in, 7-11 p.m., 307 UGLi & 8-10 p.m., 2332 Bursley.
Amer. Chem. Soc./Students-Free tutoring for Chemistry, 7-9 p.m., 3005
Chem.
Chemistry-Inorganic Seminar: William Euler, "Porphyrinic Molecular
Metals. Novel Case of Double Mixed Valences," 4p.m., 1200 Chem.
Trotter House & Eclipse Jazz-Jazz Improvisational Workshop, 8:30-10
p.m., Trotter House.
SYDA Foundation-Free meditation class by, Dick Mann, 7:30 p.m., 902
Baldwin. For more info. call 994-5625.
International Ctr.-Gloria Kenney will present a program about study
abroad & internship possibilities in Great Britain, 4 p.m., International Ctr.
Rec. Rm.
Hillel-"The Clown Conspiracy." Clowns from the Moscow Circus
speaking on "The Jewish Underground Theatre Movement in Moscow," 8
p.m., 1429 Hill.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

Look for clues hidden in the Daily
Tuesday through Friday.

Classifieds page

Count Bill of Rights

Article II:
The Slice of Life 'unification Act.
A Slice of
the Good
Life!

Republican leaders want
balanced budget by 1985

(Continued from Page 1)
on social issues.
The Republican officials also backed,
in principle, President Reagan's "new
federalism" program to transfer about
40 federal programs to states and called
on Congress to enact the needed
legislation this year.
But at the behest of GOP governors
attending the session, the conference
said the federal government should

retain much of the financial respon-
sibility for welfare programs and that
state governments should not be
"financially penalized" for picking up
federal programs.
Reagan's "new federalism" proposal
called for the federal government to
take over Medicaid with the states
assuming responsibility for welfare
programs.

Slice of Pizza Special
5o Cents Off Any Slice
Eveny Monday 5-12 Midnight
1140 S. University at Church
668-8411

4 4

4 4

Correction
A March 12 Daily article ("Some $100,000 federal research grant, leaving
profs criticize indirect costs") $58,000 to cover indirect costs. Actually,
erroneously reported that University they receive $63,300, and $36,700 is used
researchers receive $42,000 from a for the indirect costs.
From the Early Years of U. of M.
STU DENT
POSTAL DOORS
Antiques
Handiersfted
Into
Redwood Bonks
WITH SOLID BRASS CORNERS AND COIN SLOTS
WHICH COAAPl IAAMNT THE C I In RD ASCA nnR-stc

U.S. - JAPAN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY CONFERENCE
* * ***INDUSTRY AT
THE CROSSROADS
PUBLIC FORUM

MARCH 16, 1982, HILL AUDITORIUM
PRESENTED BY
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

including...

"The Need for Local Content Legislation"
DOUGLAS FRASER, President,
United Automobile Workers

"Internationalization of the Auto Industry:
A Japanese Perspective"
HIDEYO TAMURA, Managing Director Overseas Operations,
Toyota Motor Company

TUESDAY

LUNCH DISCUSSION MARCH 16-12 NOON

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