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March 06, 1982 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-06

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, March 6, 1982-Page 3.

Federal cuts
(Continued from Page 1) number
THE FEDERAL lab supports resear- said, "b
ch at the University's GLMWC each out."
year and the center will lose this "I thi
assistance if the part of the budget research
eliminating the lab is approved by Great L
Congress. cy," h4
"It's just one more cutback," said the ministra
director of the University's center, BUTC
Alfred Beeton, who is also a professor the lab
of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. would b4
"It looks like all the Great Lakes make u
programs are on a hit list." ch. "Th
The lab, which works on a number of unique
joint research projects with the Univer- states si
sity's center, employs 50 full-time said.
research scientists and 40 part-time The h
assistants, many of whom are students already
at the University or at Eastern hiring fr
Michigan University. reviewer
THFE LAB was opened in 1974 and, ac- marks, h
cording to biological technician Mike "Peop
Quigley, is the only inland research lab labs in
studying the Great Lakes. example
The lab works on a number of resear- said. "7
ch projects, ranging from monitoring
the water level of the lakes to studying
ways to navigate the lakes during the
winter. But the hardest-hit project, ac-
cording to Beeton, would be one the lab
works on with the University's center,
studying the damaging introduction of
toxic materials to the lakes. That
project would lose 75 percent of its fun-
ds, he said. I
The lab would not be the first of its
kind to be closed down over the past few
years. The government also cut off fun-
ds to the Argonne National
Laboratories and the Great Lakes
Basin Commission, said Stan Bolsegna,
an assistant to lab Director Eugene
Aubert.
THE NATIONAL Atmospheric and
Oceanic Association, which ad-
ministers the lab as part of the Depar-
tment of Commerce, has suffered a

1_1 I

may nt
of budget cutbacks, Bolsegna
ut we are being totally zeroed
ink what is planned is that the
h be conducted outside of the
akes area or by another agen-
e said of the Reagan ad-
ation's plan.
QUIGLEY, who has worked at
for five years, claimed that it
e difficult for other agencies to
pfor the loss of the lab's resear-
e serviceswve are providing are
and vital and something the
imply couldn't take over," he
ab, which Quigley said had
been hit by understaffing and
reezes over the past year, was
ad last year and received high
he said.
le said we were held up to other
the NOAA network (as an
of high quality)," Quigley
That was gratifying. And in

I

'U' center
February we found out that our funding
was cut right out from under us. It's
very disconcerting."
IN HOPES of defeating their:.
proposed elimination, staff members of
the lab have been in contact with en-
vironmental groups and
legislators-including Congressman
Carl Pursell, who represents Ann Ar
bor-seeking their help.
"We're very optimistic, but there'sa_
great deal of uncertainty also," Quigley
said. "It's been quite a struggle just:
trying to learn what's going on in
Washington. One day you're learning
about biology, and the next you're lear:
ning about Congress."
UNIVERSITY senior Nancy Faegen
burg, who has worked at the lab for two
years as an assistant research scien
tist, said if the lab is closed, it will-
severely limit the research oppor=
tunities for University students in the-
atmospheric and oceanic fields.

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
STEVEN BILLER, a University physics major, magically entertains (from left) Tom Wright, Ann Cisco, and Mary
Lavin Monday night at Bicycle Jim's.
Student creates his own magic

By ANNE MYTYCH
No, he doesn't own a rabbit-or even
a top hat from which to pull it. But for
Steve Biller, it doesn't matter. He's a
magician just the same.
Biller, a sophomore majoring in
physics, has his magic show at Bicycle
Jim's, a local restaurant, every \Mon-
day night during the term.
HE PERFORMS, he says, because
he loves to entertain people. "Inside of
everyone," he said, "is a child and they
want to be fooled. the nmagician helps to
brng back the feeling of mystery we
lose when we become adults."
He's been performing at Bicycle
Jim's since fall of last year, and he is
the first entertainer to perform in the
restaurant. Performingclose-up magic
right on customer's tables, Biller uses
coins, cards, and small sponge balls (he
calls them "flurbs") in his illusions. He
likes bicycle Jim's because it has the
'right atmosphere."
"I enjoy entertaining people," Biller
said. "There's a certain amount of
power in feeling you can fool people
ith magic."
THE SHOW at Bicycle Jim's is the
product of .years of interest in perfor-
ming illusins, Biller says. He said he
has been performing magic since he
(was 11years old.

Biller has been performing seriously
for the past five years.
While he was still in high school, he
taught magic classes in the Southfield
school district and at the Jewish Com-
munity Center in Oak Park.
Mistakes? Biller says he makes
them, but they've always been minor.
"I try not to make mistakes," he said.
"I practice thoroughly with my tricks
before I perform. Before I perform,
I'm prepared, and if I make a mistake I
have to think fast...I've never messed
up where it really shows."
IN FACT, he says, many of his tricks
are designed to make the audience
think he has made a mistake - until the
last moment. "People like to trap the
magician. I like to plan on that," he
said.
He's entered - and won - several
competitions for magicians. While in.
high school, he competed in the "Em-
porium of Magic" in 1979, where he won
the first prize. He also won top honors
at at international competition held in
Colon, Michigan in August 1980.
He also performed in Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania at the Brotherhood of
Magic Contest in July of last year and
won second prize. There were
magicians from fifteen countries com-
peting in the festival.
Biller belongs to the Society of

American Magicians, the International
Brotherhood of Magicians, the Tel
Twelve Mystics, and the Magical
Youths International.
When Biller graduates from the
University, he hopes to go into research
with his physics degree. He also plans
to continue to develop his magic. He
said he hopes to experiment with his
physics and apply it to his magic.

a

IV.

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* -* ~ 4 4

-HAPPENINGS-
HIGHLIGHT
The University Electronics Music Studio will perform new works tonight
at 8 p.m. at Rackham Aud.
FILMS
Alternative Action-The Adventures of Robin Hood, 4, 7, 8:50, & 10:40 p.m.
MLB 4.
Cinema Guild-The Stunt Man, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Cinema II-O Lucky Man, 6 & 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Mediatrics-James Bond Film Festival: On Her Majesty's Secret Service,
10:30 a.m. Michigan Theater; Diamonds Are Forever, 1 p.m.; Live And Let
Die, 3:05 p.m.; Man With The Golden Gun, 5:15 p.m.; The Spy Who Loved
Me, 7:30 p.m.; Moonraker, 9:45 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Voice Recital, Penny Johnson, soprano, 2 p.m., Recital
Hall; Piano Recital, Stella Sung, 4 p.m., Recital Hall; Piano Recital, Sharon
Kleinhuizen, 6 p.m. Recital Hall; Viola Recital, Nancy Newby, 6 p.m.,
Stearns; Violin Recital, Dianne Cooper, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Brass Ring-Black Sabbath with Wrabit, 8 p.m., Cobo Arena.
PTP-"One Mo' Time!," 6 & 9:30 p.m., Power Center.
Ark-Joel Mabus, 9 p.m.
School of Dance-Senior dance concert, "More Than Moving Feet," 8
p.m., Studio A, Dance Bldg.
Canterbury Loft-The Stage Co., The Indian Wants the Bronx, by Israel
Horowitz, 7, 8, & 10:30 p.m., 332 S. State.
SPEAKERS
Political Science Women's Caucus-Symposium, "The Relevance of Gen-
der to Political Research," 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 6th. floor Conf. room, ISR. -
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom-International
Women's Day talk by Robert Hull, "The U.N. Second Session on Disar-
mament: Hope in a Titanic World,"9:30 a.m., Ann Arbor Public Library.
MISCELLANEOUS
Ann Arbor Go Club-Mtg., 1 p.m.-7 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
WCBN-FM 88.3 - Patchwork: a folk music radio show of Irish, British,
and American music hosted by Adam Price and Jeanne Greenblatt, 11 a.m.-
I p.m. Ann Arbor Friends of Traditional Folk Music-Old time square &
contra-dance, 8 p.m., Union.
Alumni Theatre Series-Sem., Walter Eysselinck and Hazen Schumacher,
"One Mo' Time!," 10 a.m.-noon, League.
Friends of Matthaei Botanical Gardens-Monthly Lobby Sale at the Gar-
dens, 1800Dixboro Rd., 10a.m.-4:30 p.m.
WSDS-"Milt Wilcox Sports Review," highlights of Michigan sports from
the week, Larry Ladman. Radio 1480 AM.
The Michigan Union Arts Program-"Early French Baroque Music," 8
p.m., Pendleton-Room, Union.
U of M chapter Theta Chi Fraternity-"Dribble-a-thon," from Ann Arbor
to Pontiac Silverdome, all day.
Artworlds-Exhibit of recent paintings by Shoshana Gunsberg, reception:

-4f.r

Celebrating Our

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Fourth Year as THE Mexican Restaurant,
in Ann Arbor
with
* Newly Redecorated Interior
* New Hours:
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11:00 AM-3:00 AM Friday through Saturday

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* EARLY BIRD SPECIAL - 2:30 PM TO 4:30 PM.
Free Regular Size Soft Drink with minimum food pur-
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NITE .OWL SPECIAL - 8:00 PM to Closing. Free
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homemade Tortilla Chips with minimum food purchase.

" NEW PICK-UP PARKING- Give us a phone
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STATE.
Tti EAr K--
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STATE.

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