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March 05, 1982 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-05

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"Here is an orchestra of sound musicianship and first-rate
quality."
- The Times, London
p~cae r;'.Xa rav c~+ 't .
Erich Bergel, Conductor
DTROIT SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Schubert: Symphony No. 8 (Unfinished)'
Beethoven: Piano Concerto in B-flat
Radu Lupu, pianist
Lutoslawski: Concerto for Orchestra
Fri March 5 at 8:30
Hill Auditorim
Tickets at $5.00, $7.00, $9.00, $10.00, $11.00, $13.00
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12
(313) 665-3717
RUSH TICKETS
Available from 4-4:30 today at Hill Auditorium Box Office
$3.00 ea.-limit 2
7jIVE iVSITYeUSICAL 8OCIETY
In Its 103rd Year

ARTS'
Page 6 Friday, March 5, 1982 The Michigan Daily
Ho iger Os oboe
not an i wind r

By Jane Carl
O BOES ARE primarily regarded as
orchestral instruments in
America, as are most wind instrumen-
ts, and have been defined as "an ill
wind that nobody blows good;" but
Heinz Holliger, the bookish, bespec-
tacled, 42-year-old Swiss oboist and
composer, has done more than his part
to change both images.
His overwhelming virtuosity has ear-
ned him world-wide acclaim for both
his interpretation of the expansive
baroque oboe literature and that of new
works by composers such as Berio,
Stockhausen, and Penderecki, who are
among the 60 composers that have writ-
ten works for Hollinger.
Speaking by phone from Seattle,
where he appeared before his recent
American premier of a work by Witold
Lutislowski for oboe and harp with the
Minnesota Orchestra, Holliger related
the state of European oboists. "The
oboe is much more common as a solo
instrument in Europe, especially in
England, which is due to the British
oboist Leon Goosens, a pioneer in the
field. In America, the training from the
very beginning is orchestral.
."I, too, started more than twenty
years ago as an orchestral player, but
that was only for three years. Now I
sometimes think it is also a pity that I
am a soloist. I would like to play with a

good orchestra and a good conductor,
but only for one concert. Then, I would
go back and be a soloist again,"
said Holliger with a laugh.
As a composer, Holliger studies with
Boulez and was very influenced by the
Viennese school. His own Study on
Multiphonics explored the harmonics,
chords, and various other effects
possible on the oboe. Speaking of the
two vocations Holliger said, "Both
professions are together. I couldn't be
without either one. I wouldn't play as I
do if I didn't compose, and I wouldn't
compose as i do if I didn't play.
"Although I have written for the
oboe, I'm not interested in writing
music for my onw performance. I'm
very interested in the human voice. I've
recently written two one-act operas
based on the Beckett plays "Come and
Go" and "Not I," and a cycle for a
capella chorus using the poems of
Holderin."
Heinz Holliger and his wife Ursule, a
harpist, will appear at Rackham
Auditorium Sunday, March 7, at 4:00
p.m. The program will consist of 19th
century paraphrases of Bellini and
Donizetti, solo works for oboe and harp
by Benjamin Britten, and Andre
Jolivet's Controversia, a piece in-
troducing new techniques for both oboe
and harp. Tickets are available at the
University Musical Society, Burton
Tower.

Swiss-born oboist Heinz Holliger displays his expertise at Rackham
Auditorium Sunday afternoon.

APPRENTICESHIPS IN THE ARTS

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Siouxsie and the Ban-
shees-'Kaleidoscope' & 'Once
Upon a Time/The Singles'
(PVC-Jem)
Both of these albums seem to have
been released in America without much
fanfare; apparently the attitude of the
record company is that their release
was required by historical obligation, a
sentiments that (quite literally) sells
them short.
Kaleidoscope, especially, deserves'
far more attention. Every bit as com-
manding as its follow-up, juju', you
might also find it somewhat more
listenable. The hooks seem somewhat
more liberally doled out over the course
of Kaleidoscope, though that in no way
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In many ways, I think history may
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an underestimated quantity in their
own time. An apt comparison would be
that Siouxsie and The Banshees do for
dance music what The Velvet Un-
derground did for folk music-they took
it on a tangent that explored its darker
implications and applications, and
thereby set the standards for wave af-
ter wave of fascinating derivations.
But that possibility is clear only on
Kaleidoscope. It is much harder to
mate a strong case for Once Upon a
Time, which seems mostly just ar-
bitrary and obligatory. The only real
use I can see for this LP is as a basic
Banshees primer. All of side twq is now
available"on other albums, which one
really must own if one is to take Sioux-
sie seriously.
And if side two is unnecessary, side
two is downright annoying. Personally,
I would much prefer to forget that The
Banshees produced any music prior to
Kaleidoscope. Even if "Hong Kong
Garden" is the "poppiest" thing thatQ
The Banshees have ever done, it still
can't overcome the forced and strident
temperament that completely obscures
their other work from this period. The
only amusing aspect of this stuff is that
the musical histronics (produced high
and shrill like fingernails scratching on
a blackboard) make Siouxsie's vocals
sound every bit as ridiculously trashy..
as the best/worst of Black Sabbath.
If that sounds good to you, go ahead
and try Once Upon a Time with my,
blessings. But I could almost guarantee-
that you'll find Kaleidoscope that much
better. It is here that we finally see the
true blossoming of Siouxsie and the
Banshee's nightmare factory. I'm sure*.
The Banshees would much prefer to be
remembered as The Velvets rather-
than the Black Sabbath of their era.
-Mark Dighton,

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