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March 04, 1982 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-04

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ARTS
The Michigan Daily Thursday, March 4, 1982 Page 5

375 N MAPLE
769-1300
BARGAIN SHOWS $2.50 Before 4PM

A selection of campus film highlights

Quadrophenia
(Frank Roddam, 1980)
The quintessential British
adolescent anxiety film. Phil
paniels stars as a frustrated teen,
druggling to find some meaning in
his life. The intelligence of the script
i matched only by the accuracy of
the acting, especially that of Daniels
,urbulent, 'mixed-up kid. Unlike
Tommy, where the. music was the
.lm, The Who's album forms a sub-
fie undercurrent of emotion against
Ihich the action is played. (Thur-
day,March 4; Aud. A, 7:00, 9:00).

Hi Mom!
(Brian De Palma, 1970)
A sequel to De Palma's Greetings,
which had Robert DeNiro trying to
outfox the psychiatrist at his induc-
tion into the army. Hi Mom! tells the
story of DeNiro's return from Viet-
ham and his business making dirty
movies. (Friday, March 5; MLB 4,
7:00).
Mean Streets
(Martin Scorsese, 1973)
This is a brutal, 'vibrant film of
growing up in New York's Little
Italy. Harvey Keitel and Robert'
DeNiro star as friends who are
beset by loan sharks and the
mafia. Based upon a story by Scor-
sese, who grew up in the neigh-
borhood, the movie has an uncom-
mon poignancy. (March 5; MLB 4,
8:30).

Vegas stopping bad guys. (March 6,
1:00).
Live and Let Live (Guy Hamilton,
1973) Roger Moore's first outing as
the invincible 007 has him thwarting
a heroin ring in the Caribbean.
(March 6, 3:05).
The Man with the Golden Gun
(Guy Hamilton, 1974) Moore must
stop a dangerous international hit
man, Christopher Lee, from using a
solar energy capsule. With Herve
"de plane boss!" Villachaize. (Mar-
ch 6, 5:15).
The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis
Gilbert, 1977) One of the most suc-
cessful 007 films. Moore must be
friendly with Barbara Bach to stop
an evil genius from controlling the
world. With Richard Kiel as Jaws.
(March 6, 7:30).
Moonraker (Lewis Gilbert, 1979)
Moore goes into outer space via the
space shuttle to stop the takeover of
the world. (March 6, 9:45).
For Your Eyes Only (John Glenn,
1980) The latest James Bond film
stars Moore in spectacular chase af-
ter chase. But it does more than
that, inverting many of the typical
Bond elements; we see 007 not in his
shiny fast car, but in a beat up VW;
chasing a villain we hear him pan-
ting out of breath. It's an older Bond,
but just as exciting. (Sunday, March
7; Aud. A,7:00, 9:00).
O Lucky Man
(Lindsay Anderson, 1973)
Mild mannered stock boy Malcolm
McDowell is sent off on the wildest
road movie you've ever seen. From
the wierd back-room of a bar, to the
explosion at a research center, to a
pastoral serenity, to a mad doctor's
experiments ... The film is very
episodic, but throughout it are the
unique songs of Alan Price which
pull together the widely disparate
scenes. (Saturday; March 6; Aud. A,
6:00, 9:00).
The Trial
(Orson Welles, 1963)
Anthony Perkins is the central
figure in this film based upon Franz
Kafka's novel. One morning,
Perkins is arrested and brought to
trial, but is never told for what
reason. Welles' direction provides
the same frustrated emotion for this
man that the book describes. A
marvelous 'vision of what the world
may become. (Sunday, March 7;
Lorch Hall, 8:45).
The 20th Ann Arbor
Film Festival
Celebrating its 20th anniversary,
this festival of 16mm films from
aross the country will be presenting
a different show each evening at 7, 9,
and 11 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday; 1, 7, and 9 p.m. Saturday,
with festival winners screened Sun-
day, March 14, at 7, 9, and 11 p.m. at
the Michigan Theater.
The festival is renowned for its
experimental works and films by
avant-garde cineastes. Out of . the
approximately 140 hours of films
submitted, about 30 hours of movies
are selected for the public
screenings. From the winners, a
total of nine hours are picked to go
on a nationaltour.
This is an event for movie lovers in
Ann Arbor, so don't miss it.
Witness for the
Prosecution
(Billy Wilder, 1958)
Highlighted by sterling performan-
ces, especially Charles Laughton as
the aging barrister, this Agatha
Christie courtroom drama is witty,
disarming, and surprising. One of

Billy Wilders most entertaining
and engrossing movies. (Wed-
nesday, March 10; MLB 3, 7:00).
-compiled by Richard Campbell

Nit A Riveting 7
and AWAI
Enthralling NATh
C J . Film.
CriARJITS OFFIRE

:ADfM
RD
,I"
'IONS

BURT LANCASTER
SUSAN SARANDON 3.30
ATLANT:C 5:30
C:TT 7.30
PARAMOUNT x
PICTURE X930
5 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS
JACK NICHOLSON
He found oline 11
within himself. 32
THE 3:20
BORDER 7:30
A UNIERS) . Q9:45
DON'T YOU WISH 4 ACADEMY AWARD
YOU WERE ARTHUR- NOMi'
Dudley Liza 3:30
Moore M nneli 530
The notun mone can:buy 17 40
INDIVIDUAL THEA TRES M
5th Awe o' Lberty 761-0700
a0 With This Entire Ad One Ticket
$50 MON, WED, THURS Eve.
Good Thru 3 E4/82
14th and FINAL WEEK

Ornette Coleman and the Prime Time band performed at Power Center during Spring break.
Innovative jazz from Coleman

m
1:1
4:001
7:00
4:30

James
Festival

Bond Film

Mediatrics has accumulated the
classic James Bond films and will
screen each one over the weekend.
See Sean Connery begin the series in
Dr. No all the way to Roger. Moore's
g1ng, spy in ForYomr, EyesOnly.
The Bond films all feature exotic
locations, lots of thinly clad women,
hundreds of double entendres, ex-
pensive production values, chases,
explosions, fist fights, gun battles,
and the inimitable opening credit
sequence often with a chart-busting
song. Something for everybody. All
showings are at the Michigan
Theater, except for For Your Eyes
Only.
Dr. No (Terence Young, 1962) Con-
nery investigates mysterious
Jamaica and tangles with the evil
Dr. No. (March 5,1:45).
From Russia With Love (Terence
Young, 1963) Connery gets involved
with a nasty assasination
plot - against himself. With Robert
Shaw. (March 5, 3:45).
Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)
Connery attempts to foil a planned
heist of Fort Knox's gold. (March 5,
5:50).
Thunderball (Terence Young,
1965) Connery attempts to foil the
destruction of Miami by nuclear
terrorism. (March 5,7:45).
You Only Live Twice (Lewis
Gilbert, 1967) Connery is set in
Japan against the evil SPECTRE
prganization, which is attempting to
start a global war. (March 5, 10:00).
On Her Majesties Secret Service
(Peter Hunt, 1969) George Lazenby
struggles as an interim Bond, trying
to halt the takeover of the world.
(Saturday, March 6, 10:30 a.m.)
Diamonds Are Forever (Guy
Hamilton, 1971) Connery's last Bond
film. He romps around colorful Las

By Jerry Brabenec
S PRING BREAK is over, the Daily
is printing again, and we can report
on a significant musical event that oc-
cured while all of you sun-mongers
were out of town. Thursday, February
18, Eclipse presented Ornette
Coleman's new fusion group, Prime
Time, at the Power Center.
Ornetter Coleman's unique com-
positional style contains contradictory
elements of complexity and simplicity,
of control and randomness. Coleman
developed these ideas in the '50s, when
most jazz musicians were following the
example of Charlie Parker by devising
ever more complex variations on the
basic, traditional harmony of popular
music, the so-called Tin Pan Alley
tunes like "I've Got Rhythm." A typical
jazz tune would consist of a melody, or
"head," usually 12 or 32 bars long,
followed by solos on the same chords
and form, and a repetition of the head to
close the tune.
What Coleman had in mind was a
style of jazz that could develop
organically-where each piece would
have a unique form, and the soloists
would be free to develop their own ideas
from that form, without the constraints
of traditional structure. This approach
also meant that each instrument in the
group would function in a wider, more
flexible sense-bass would function as
more than just a background, foun-
dation instrument, for example.
Based on the show at the Power Cen-
ter, fans of Coleman's early music
need not be alarmed at the prospect of a
sell-out like that of, say, Freddie Hub-
bard. Prime Time churns out a very
exciting and challenging sound, up-
dated with electric guitar licks and
funky bass lines. The compositional
style, a trebly, nervous sound, and
Coleman's inimitable post-bop sax
lines, largeley unchanged over all these
years, brand the music with an in-
delible signature.
The instruments are still very depen-

dent, and with two each of electric
guitar, electric bass, and drums, the
resulting sound is very dense. The
players all refer back to a couple of key
riffs that appear in the opening of each
tune, but each player is also given a
great deal of improvisational leeway,
so that the band's sound can vary
widely from moment to moment. Tight
and economical, then crazed and
energetic, this flux can result in
dismaying chaos or wonderfully seren-
dipitous surprises. The roles the in-
struments serve can change, too. The
bass guitar can play a traditional bass
line, a horn melody paralleling
Coleman's, and even sometimes
another percussion part.
In theory, one would assume the in-
struments with the exception, of
Coleman's were to function on an equal
footing, but either by temperment or
thorugh the PA mix, some players
stood out. Drummer Denardo Coleman,
Ornette's son, supplied more colors to
the fundamental beat of the other
drummer, and one bassist was in the
spotlight playing duets with Coleman
while the other 'played funk licks that
compleiented the drums. One
guitarist played solo lines and rhythm
parts while the other played thematic
riffs, of ten complementing or doubling
Coleman's melodies.
Coleman walked out to great ap-
plause clad in a black silk suit with
white patches, and introduced the first
tunes as "City Limits," and "Black
Genetics." The rhythmic vocabulary of
the tunes varied from disco to rock to
rhumba to march to bop, often com-
bining different elements. The standout
performer besides Coleman was the
bassist Jamaldeen Tacuma, who
played frantic lead lines on a futuristic
plastic bass. guitar. The band produced
some mysterious sounds that were very
hard to pinpoint -on any in-
strument-scalar rans during pauses in
one tune sounded like the electric piano,
and later a percussive perking brought
to mind an old coffee commerical.
"Black Genetics" featured Coleman on
cornet, switching to sax on the bridge.
The set closer was the relatively well
known psychofunk tune, "Dancing in
Your Head," and after a rather
humorous attempt at audience rapport
("are there any musicians here
tonight? ... Good."), Coleman picked
up an electric violin to play some ex-
citing, sawing bow work on a number

entitled "Sun X." Prime Time's music.
left a mood of freedom in the air. The
music seemed more a set of
possibilities than a set of known quart-
tities, and the listener was free to pick
his own aural path through the inter-
mingling lines.
r1
Hot 1920's
Musical
MARCH 6 & 7
Saturday- 6 & 9-30pm
Sunday: 2 & 8pm
POWER CENTER
STUDENT'
SPECIAL
Tickets half price
$5-8 with ID
PTP - Michigan League
764 - 0450

* WARREN
BEATTY
DAILY-8:30

(PG)

0

ENDS TONIGHT
" "TAXI ZUM KLO"
At7:15,9:15

STARTS FRIDAY

S.

vWhile vocationing
in the Greek Isles,
famous detective
Wercule Poirot spotted a
* beautiful woman on the
beach. Realizing that she
* was dead, he did not
ask her to dinner.
PETER USTINOV

6
6

ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS
IncI .. Best Picture

6
6
I
I

I..

S
S

O
RODDY McDOWELLI

* GiSTE'S
FRI-7:30, 9:40 (PG)

t

/

I

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3C,

r/

THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
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NOON LUNCHEON
Soup & Sandwich $1
FRIDAY MARCH 5
TIM FREEMAN, member Board of
Directors United States Student As-
sociotion:
BUILDING A NATIONAL
STUDENTMOVEMENT
IN THE U.S.
GUILD HOUSE- 802 Monroe St.

UAC Committee Chair
AppIications
Due March 10
Available at UAC office
Sign up for interviews then

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