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March 02, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-02

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d

Police disband Atlanta task force

ATLANTA (AP)- With the conviction of Wayne
Willams in the slayings of two young blacks, police
have closed the books on 21 other slayings in a 22-
month string of killings, Atlanta Public Safety Com-
missioner Lee Brown said yesterday.
A special task force created in July 1980 to in-
vestigate the cases will be disbanded next Monday,
Brown said.'
"DO YOU believe Wayne Williams committed 23
murders?" Brown was asked.
"Yes we do," said Brown, who made the announ-
cement at a news conference with top law enfor-
cement officers from federal, state, city and county
agencies.
The officials met for one hour and 20 minutes at the

task force headquarters on West Peachtree Street to
make their decision.
"WITH THE convictiion of Wayne B. Williams, we
have as a result cleared 23 cases, based upon the
evidence," Brown said. Seven other cases will
remain open but will be turned over to the orginary
1jurisdictions involved, he said.
Williams, a 23-year-old black free-lance photogr-
apher and aspiring talent promoter, was convicted of
murder Saturday in the slayings of Nathaniel Cater,
27, and Jimmy Ray Payne, 21, the 26th and 28th vic-
tims on the task force list. He was sentenced to two
life prison terms and has said he will appeal.
Fulton County District Attorney Lewis Slaton and
DeKalb County prosecutor Robert Wilson, in whose

jurisdictions most of the cases lie, met with the police
officials yesterday and said no more indictments will
be sought against Williams.
"We think the community, which stood behind the
investigation, certainly understands that the eviden-
ce we possess, some of which has not been made
public, is what's being used to make the decision" to
close the task force, Brown said.
Brown denied reports that young blacks fitting the
profile of those on the task force list have been slain
since Williams' arrest last June. "There have been no
killings unsolved that fit," he said.
The official also denied that, during the height of
the investigation, he had said he believed more than
one killer was involved in the slayings.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 2, 1982--Pave 5
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Counselors, specialists, supervisors,
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313/661-0600
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Students protest proposed aid cuts in rally

(Continued from Page )
ill "It'sd not only myself I'm worried
r. I want people to see the connection
t etween money going to defense and
,out of their education. Instead of going
into education, funds are gong to the
miilitary and the army will be the only
choice (for young people who cannot af-
fprd college)."
"I came down here basically because
we've just suffered a 16 percent in-
crease in tuition. If you add a 33 per-
cent cut inaid, that's too much to take,"
said Jay Nagel, a junior at Renileur
Technical Institute at Troy, N.Y.
The college students targeted the of-
fices of their hometown legislators and
those from the state where they go to
school. In the offices of the individual
legislators, the students often struggled
to get beyond receptionists or aides to
speak with the congressmembers -or
senators.
In some offices, the students ran up
against stiff oppostion, but in some they
found strong support.
DEMOCRATIC Congressman Ted

Weiss from Manhattan told the students
that yesterday's rally would probably
play an important role in defeating the
cutbacks backed by the White House.
Speaking at the rally n the Capitol
steps, Weiss praised the students'
commitment to fighting the proposed
rollbacks in aid. "You've done a fan-
tastic job and all of us in Congress owe
you a great debt. Up until this point, we
haven't gotten the type of feedback that
we've gotten today. "
"I know the members of the House
and Senate that you've spoken to were
impressed by your knowledge and
commitment," Weiss added. "If you do
your job, I'm convinced this Congress
will do its job for you and for the
nation."
SPEAKER O'Neill made a surprise
appearance at the rally and told studen-
ts they were helping to prevent more
cutbacks in support to higher
education.
"The Congress of the United States
responds to the will of the American
people," said O'Neill, who called the

administration's proposed cutbacks
"hard and tough, harsh and stern."
"We can stop this program of cuts.
Education is not for the rich along;
education is the greatest asset this
nation has," O'Neill told the students,
who swarmed over the Hill for what
they called "National student Action
Day."
At times, the day's activities took an
almost satirical tone, with one student
speaking at the rally wearing a Reagan
mask while others from Monmouth
College in New Jersey dressed in caps
and gowns, claiming that if they didn't
graduate now they probably would not
be able to at all.
VENDORS IN the crowd hawked T-
Shirts commemorating the day's even-
ts and students walked through the
crowd handing out buttons reading "We
are the future."
At the rally at the Capitol, which was
constantly interrupted by bursts of ap-
plause for speakers or jeers when the
administration's policies were men-
tioned, a number of key legislators

promised the students that they would
serve as part of a coalition to block the
proposed cutbacks.
Congressman John, Conyers (D-
Detroit) praised the students' diligence
and urged them to continue the fight to
stop the cutbacks. "It is an elitist
notion that only those that can pay can
get an education," Conyers said. "We
desperately need new-thinking and fine
minds to come to Washington. Until we
come together, they will pick us off one
at a time. We're in this together."
THE CROWD received another sur-
prise when Sen Alfonse D'Amato (R-
New York) spoke ut against the
proposed cuts. "I believe that the
budget cuts as they relate to the
Guaranteed Student Loan Program,
and to higher education are totally
unacceptable and not in reality," he
said.
Reagan's cuts are affecting all
students, Temple senior Ina Pollack
said. "It's alienating students who
can't afford to go to school. That's not
what this country is about."

In Hot Pursuit of the Happiest
of Happy Hours
Every Monday thru Friday 4-6P.M.

1140 S. University at Church
668-8411
I$.8

Women's ed center faces review,

(Continued from Page 1)
faced by women in our society have
been solved, the need for such a center
may have decreased.
"IS THE CENTER making significant
and unique contributions in these areas,
or could significant efficiencies, and
perhaps gains in overall effectiveness,
occur if the center's present respon-
sibilities were in some part reorganized
or reassigned?" Frye's document
stated.
"Society at large has made strides in
achieving greater social equity in its at-
titude toward and expectations of
women, and therefore, the need, per-
ceived or real, for the services of the

center by its clientele may have
changed in important ways over the
years," the document maintains.
"Therefore, the Review Committee
should assess whether the Center has
appropriately adapted to recognize
these changes, or indeed whether the
need for the Center itself may have
diminished significantly in light of
these changes and other available
alternatives."
CEW Director Jean Campbell
stressed that the first stage of the
review will assess only the unit's
quality and programming, and will be
free of budget considerations.
"THE REVIEW of the Center that is

currently planned is a review of center
records, performance, and so on, by a
vice-presidentially appointed commit-
tee," said Campbell, adding, "This first
stage has nothing to do with last year's
reviews (of other units)."
Sources have speculated that the
School of Education is also under con-
sideration for an upcoming comprehen-
sive review.
"I have not heard anything official,"
said School of Education Dean Joan
Stark, "but I would be happy to see one
(a review) because I think it would
legitimize our role on campus, and as
an essential service to society."
FRYE, HOWEVER, maintains that

cutst
academic units have not yet been
targeted for review under the five-year
plan, but that discussion with his
economic affairs staff yesterday
focused on the feasibility of such a
move.
"We are in the process of deter-
mining whether there should be any
educational units, such as schools and
colleges, reviewed," said Frye.
Travel with fellow students and
professional colleagues! Repeat of
great tours 1980 & 1981.
Education & Schools June 19.
July 10 (Chinese Schools close in
mid-July)
Health Care System July 28-Aug
16.
Includes major tourist cities: Beijig,
Xian, Shanghai, Guilin, plus
others, and Hong Kong & Tokyo.
Only $3525 from San Francisco.
Limited space, deadline near. Call:
Prof. Robert Hefner, 580 Union Dr.
Rm. 459, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
(313) 763-4355.
Univer of Michigan credit ovailoble.

IS THERE
rfs IN
r, THE STIMULA
eSaint Lou
F ~Academic Ye

A BOTTLENECK
YOUR LIFE?
TRY
ATING ATMOSPHERE
is University's
ear in Madrid
ontact University
Michigan student
lizabeth Shaffer
a# our Center.

llcsigned for the concerned student who may
affluent, the one who de rands, ,riousnes'
Enjoy the Theaters, Museums, &t
of the Spanish Capita

Ynot bg financially
sin education. .Cc
Cultural Life f
d E

State Rep. probes hi-tech park contract
(Continued from Page 1)

QUALITY INSTRUCTION AT ECONOMY PRICES IN:

"best efforts" in attracting high
technology to the site, and. Baker said
he wants to know specifically what
"best efforts" means.
'Kennedy admitted there are some
questions about the agreement, but that
"I don't think they have to do with the
propriety of the agreement." He noted

that most of the concerns are "about
the wording and some of the meanings
in the agreement."
Owen's aide also said the represen-
tative is interested in why the Ann Ar-
bor site was chosen over a site in
Superior Township which had been con-
sidered for two years.

James Lesch, University director of
research and development, said the
Ann Arbor site best meets a set of
criteria from the Michigan Department
of Commerce. "The criteris were
modified to include that the research
park be 15 to 20 minutes from North
Campus," Lesch said.

ACCOUNTING
ART
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
ECONOMICS
FRENCH
PHILOSOPHY

FOREIGN SCIENCE POLITICAL SCIENCE
HISTORY PSYCHOLOGY
LANGUAGE SOCIOLOGY
LITERATURE THEOLOGY
TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Our Center is located in the Ciudad Universitaria. Staff is recruited from three
local universities. Trans-Atlantic Flights: $2 0 OAccredible courses taught in Spanish,
personal direction, educational travel. Year's Tuition: $3700. 3 -hundred students
currently enrolled. Maintenance in family or dormitory runs from $275 to $325
per month according to degree of comfort.
An ever-increasing number of Spanish students in
attendance.
Information: Raymond L.Sutllivant, S...
Calle de la Vla, 3
Madrid 3, Spain

Y mo~i&

t nz i ?1j . . ura n~wae " h -hi1
e . ,4! "t h c

.ur'v'/

et1

MARCH 27 HILL AUD. 8 PM
x= Tickets are $8.50, $7.50 and $6.50 and go on sale TOMORROW, March 3, at the
Michigan Union Ticket Office and CTC outlets.
A MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTATION
P ~SACKROOM CALEwNIDR
23 N. WQ6I4NroN
Down-roWNi YPstLAN'fl
sM NKSi~ t4I N tE--' NT' SW SP
7 OC u 5KI CLUB NO Sa eCOWV EN ESE ..
FUNS{ 6E ~AA A
,q F >,I 8r~'flJr ..9 Iv z- I 7s ARC'19, dzO

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