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March 02, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

UAW, AMC

i

talks; Fordp

From UPI and AP
CHICAGO - UAW representatives at
American Motors Corp. voted yester-
day to met with the company in a
meeting that could lead to early con-
tract talks on AMC's request for $150
million in concessions.
UAW Secretary Treasurer Raymond
Majerus said, "There was no decision
to start the negotiation but that will be
on the agenda next Monday.
"There are a lot of questions and a lot
of information that's needed. The
locals are anxious to understand the
plan. It's a big decision."
MEANWHILE, officials of the United
Auto Workers union and Ford Motor Co.
yesterday signed a historic agreement
expected to save the automaker $1
billion over 31 months, but analysts say
consumers should not expect big drops
in the prices of Ford cars.
The analysts say only an upturn in
car sales will bring back profits and put
laid-off workers back on the assembly
lines.
The accord, ratified by a 3-1 margin
in weeklong voting that ended Sunday,
took effect as soon as it was signed.
THE CONTRACT bargaining came
six months early in the midst of the
devastating auto sales slump. The old
contract would have expired Sept. 14.
Majerus had earlier indicated talks
could begin at the end of the week. It
would be the union's third round of
negotiations with the automakers this
year.

Under the novel p
fall, AMC's 14,000r
ployees will lend th
cent of their future w
The money will be pa
in September 1983, v
terest.
THAT RATE is f
company would be<
open market.
Analysts have es
cessions would be wo
AMC says it needs
an extensive new

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 2, 1982-Page 3....:
to begin
)act signed
roposal made last labor cost of $20.55: However, company
rank and file em- and union officials have refused to con-
e company 10 per- firm the figure.
vages and benefits. Labor cost savings from the con-
Lid back, beginning cessions should average about $160 per
with 10 percent in- vehicle, but that's "hardly enough to
get car sales turned around," said
ar lower than the David Eisenberg, auto industry analyst,
able to get on the at Sanford Bernstein and Co. in New
York.
timated the con-
rth $150 million.
the money to back
product planning 375 N. MAPLE

BUDaily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
BreakMig Up Soon
The sun finishes warming icy Lake Michigan for another day last week in Grand Haven. s

program. The automaker's sales so far
this year have lagged over 50 percent
behind last year's depressed levels.
THE NEW agreement at Ford wipes
out 3 percent annual wage boosts for
Ford's 170,000 autoworkers and defers
cost-of-living allowance payments for
nine months to keep them at their
current $2.03-per-hour level.
The contract, approved 43,683 to
15,933, eliminates eight paid personal
holidays per year, erases a bonus
payment and forces new employees to
start at lower wages and benefits.
However, Ford agreed to limits on
subcontracting of work, guaranteed in-
come for higher-seniority workers,
profit sharing, improved benefits for
laid-off workers and a two-year
moratorium on plant closings due to
sending work abroad or to non-union
companies.
Ford lost $1.06 billion last year and
$1.5 billion in 1980. The $1 billion
savings figure is based on an hourly

BARGAIN SHOWS $2.50 Befor* &tPM
NO A Riveting 7 ACADEMY
$1 and AWARD _ _
TOES Enthralling NONS 1:15
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CHARIOTS OF FIRE 4:30
BURT LANCASTER
SUSAN SARANDON
ATLANTIC $1 5:30
CITY 'AOUTTUES 730 I
5 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS
JACK NICHOLSON
He found a line 115
3:20
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SDONT YOUJ WISH i ACADEMY AWARD
YOU WERE ARTHUR NOMi
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Moore Minnel 5:30
The most "un money can ot 7:40
TUES 9:45

GOP leader
WASHINGTON (AP) - A senior Re-
publican senator says he and other
GOP leaders sometimes are dismayed
in their meetings with President
Reagan because he responds to their
concerns "on a totally different tack"
than the issue at hand.
For example, when the Senate budget
chairman recently expressed conster-
nation with a deficit exceeding $100
billion, the president told an anecdote
about someone buying vodka with food
stamps, according to Bob Packwood,
who heads the Senate Republican Cam-
paign Committee.
REAGAN concluded the story with
"That's what's wrong," said Pack-
wood.
"And we just shake out heads," the
senator added.
Packwood attributed the problem to
what he termed an "idealized concept
of America," by Reagan that is
basically white, male and Protestant.
That view, the Oregon senator said, is
destroying the GOP's appeal among
blacks, Hispanics, and Jews.
"THAT WILL hurt us more in the
long run than the economy," Packwood
said in a weekend interview.
He said he feared that Reagan's
positions on abortion, the Equal Rights
Amendment and the handling of tax
exemptions for schools that
discriminate by race will cause lasting
damage to the party.
"The Republican Party has just

:Reagan hi
about written off those women who
work for wages in the marketplace,"
Packwood said. "We are losing them in
droves. You cannot write them off and
the blacks off and the Hispanics off and
the Jews off and assume you're going to
build a party on white Anglo-Saxon
males over 40.
"THERE AREN'T enough of us left,"
he said.
When asked if he thought Reagan was
aware that might be happening, Pack-
Wood, who supports legalized abortion
and the ERA, said he attends GOP
leadership meetings at the White House
"and that's where I've gotten the'best
insight."
"I'll see Bob Michel Republican
leader in the House throw something
out," he said, "and then the president
will respond on just a totally different
track.
"PETE DOMENICI chairman of the
Senate Budget Committee says we've
got a $120 billion deficit coming and the
president says, 'You know a person
yesterday, a young man went into a
grocery store and he had an orange in
one hand and a bottle of vodka in the
other, and he paid for the orange with
food stamps and he took the change and
paid for the vodka. That's what's
Wrong.'
"And we just shake our heads," said
Packwood.
"I really think the president has an
idealized concept of America," the

urting party
senator said. "And maybe many
Americans wish we were like that.
Maybe many Americans wish we all
looked alike, went to the same middle-
of-the-road Protestant church, and
we'd all be better off. I don't think we
would be better off."

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;n:

HAPPENINGS-
HIGHLIGHTS
Dr. Ray Taras will discuss his dissertation "Poland Under Martial Law: A
Personal View" at'4:10 p.m. in the Rackham Amphitheater. Dr. Taras, a
specialist in Polish local politics, defended his dissertation at Warsaw
University six weeks after martial law was proclaimed.
FILMS
Women's Studies-Anonymous Was a Woman, 12 p.m., Angell Hall, Rm.
2203.
SPEAKERS
Center for Chinese Studies-Harvey and Barbara Diane Hutton, "A Visit
to Urumchi and Northwest Sinkiang," 12 p.m., Lane Hall, Commons Rm.
Center for Human Growth and Development-Alphonse Burdi, "Prenatal
Emergence of Postnatal Phenotypes," 12:10 p.m., 7th fl., 300 N. INgalls.
Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies-Fr. Edgar Saguinson, 12
p.m., International Center, 7:30 p.m., Lane Hall.
Computing Center-C.C. Counseling Staff, "Chalk Talk: Simple FOR-
TRAN Debugging Using IF," 12:10 p.m., 1011 NUBS.
Department of Chemistry-Prof. F. H. Herbstein, "Aggregates of Iodine,"
4 p.m., Chemistry Bldg., Rm. 1300.
Department of Geological Sciences-Prof. D. M. Kerrick, "Contemporary
Contact Metamorphism in the Imperial Valley Geothermal System," 4:30
p.m., C.C. Little Bldg., Rm. 4001.
School of Natural Resources-Richard Earle, "Reintroduction of Fishers
to Michigan-an Evaluation of Results after Twenty Years," 4 p.m., SNR
Dana Bldg., Rm. 1040.
MEETINGS
Amnesty International-General Meeting, 7 p.m., Michigan Union,
Welker Rm.
MISCELLANEOUS
UAC-Impact Dance-Free Workshop, 7 p.m., Union Ballroom.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

Celebrating Our

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STOP BY TODAY
And Try Our Weekly Inflation Fighting Special

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