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February 19, 1982 - Image 14

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-19

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a

Page 14-Friday, February 19, 1982-The Michigan Daily

Students to receive awards
for service outside classroom

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RECORDS & TAPES USED AND 1
523 E. LIerty RECORD
MON-SAT 10-9 514% E. Wil
SUN 12-8 (upstairs
994-8031 668-1776

By JANICE DE MAGGIO
Although many students feet the
University primarily stresses
academics, the Office of Student Ser-
vices and the Michigan League Board
are trying to change the perception by
awarding students for their service to
the campus and the community.
These two groups sponsor the Student
Achievement Awards, which are given
to students for outstanding work out-
side the classroom. The awards are
granted for participation in activities
"which increase the diversity and
enhance the richness of the student's
experience and life on this campus,"
according to the nomination form.
PAST WINNERS have included a

student who coordinated the MSA
Security Task Force, a student who
organized a teach-in on human rights,
and a student who performed volunteer
services for first-time offenders at a
minimum security school.
Graduate studnet Ruth Phillips, who
was lauded for her work in a handicap-
ped students organization, said winning
the award was like "being queen for a
day."
"So often people in your organization
don't pat you on the back, so it's nice to
be appreciated," Phillips said.
THE ONLY difficulty in granting the
prize matbe narrowing down the field
of candidates. "There's a great number
of stories when you bring 30,000 studen-

ts together-people are doing heroic
things," said Vice President for Student
Affairs Thomas Easthope, who helped 0
revive the awards three years ago.
"The awards are a way for students
to identify with the University beyond
just the academic life," Easthope ad-
ded.
Any full-time graduate, or un-
dergraduate student is eligible for the
award, ten of which will. be granted
April 13. Recipients receive a plaque
from President Shapiro during a
special ceremony.
Nominations can be placed at the Of-
fice. of Students Services at 3000
Michigan Union, and should be turned
in before March 5.

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Two institutes to be reviewed for cuts

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(Continued from Page 1)
ces, histories of the institutes, and
budget statistics, Moeller said. "(Frye)
then gave us a presentation as to how
he felt about them, which helped us to
make a decision."
Moeller said that at Saturday's.
meeting, Frye presented no "target
figures" for reductions in the two in-
stitutes.
The labor relations institute received
a 1982 general fund allocation of
$308,000. The mental retardation in-
stitute received $290,000 from the
general fund last year.
FRYE SAID his staff, with the
assistance of three members of the
Budget Priorities Committee, deter-
mines which units should be reviewed
from a long list of possibilities. The
staff's review "essentially involves
every budget unit," Frye said last
night..
Robert Holbrook, assistant academic
affairs vice president, said "there are a
great many reviews under con-
sideration . . . at all stages (of the
process)." He would not confirm that
ILIR and ISMRRD were among those
under consideration.
The planned review of ILIR comes
just seven months after a special
University committee completed a re-
evaluation of the institute. That review
already has resulted in the termination
of ties the institute had with Wayne
State University.
THE INSTITUTE was organized as a
joint venture between the two univer-
sities in 1957 to study labor-
management relations.

The consensus among institute ob-
servers was that the two programs had.
operated independently since their in-
ception, and the formal ties were no
longer needed.
The 1981 ILIR review reported that
the institute's "research has declined in
quality over the years and its
educational programs suffer from a
disconnectedness from the mainstream
of the education life of the University."
"THE BENEFITS that ILIR
generates both within the University
and in the wider community it serves
appear to be disproportionately costly
in terms of the University resources
utilized," the report also concluded.
ILIR directors said last night they
had not been told of the Budget
Priorities Committee decision.
The institute is in the process of
responding to a number of the 1981
committee recommendations, said
Hyman Kornbluh, an ILIR divisional
director.
OTHER ILIR staff members said
they were shocked by the news of
another review following so closely to
the first.
The Institute for the Study of Mental
Retardation and Related Disabilities is
a clinical program that provides
training for students in a number of
disciplines, according to its director.
Herbert Grossman, who was appoin-
ted ISMRRD director one year ago,
said he has known about the impending
review for quite some time. "I initiated
some of this," he said last night.
GROSSMAN SAID that although he
believes the problems faced by the
mentally retarded "should be a major
concern of universities across the coun-

try," he realizes that the University's
financial conditon makes a review of
the program necessary.
The University's program is the only
one of its type in the state, Grossman
said.
In the course of discussion following
Frye's briefing of the Regents yester-
day, there was some concern about
what degree of involvement the Regen-
ts would have in the plan's future.
"WHAT ROLE should the Regents
properly play in identifying units and
implementing the plan?" Regent
Thomas Roach (D-Saline) asked.
Frye promised to keep the Regents
fully informed on the plan's progress
through periodic reports, though he did
not say he would necessarily seek the
Regents' approval of the plans.
Later, Roach told the Daily he was
satisfied with Frye's response to his
concerns.
"I HAVE GREAT confidence in his
(Frye's) and all of their (the executive
officers')' integrity," he said. "And,
with the reports, we can spot policy
issues as we see them."
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor)
said he was equally satisfied with the
Regents' control of the plan.
"We do have in the constitution and in
the bylaws the right to make any
University judgment," he said. "We're
all in this boat together; the Regents as
well as everyone else."
Several of the Regents praised the
administration's "foresight" in
preparing the plan, noting that this was
one of the University's first efforts at
long-range planning beyond the
traditional year-to-year budget
analysis.

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