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February 19, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Shapiro: Research open to communist

By PERRY CLARK
University President Harold Shapiro yester-
day affirmed that the University will not
estrict the access of visiting scholars from
communist nations to research materials.
Shapiro made his comments yesterday
following the disclosure that two FBI agents
were on campus last week, seeking information
on the research activities of a visiting Soviet
mathematics scholar.
"IN GENERAL, my reaction is that the
University, unless legally obligated to do so,
ought to not release information about students
without their permission, or about faculty

members," Shapiro said.
Jon Heise, the director of the International
Center, the University's liaison with foreign
students, said the incident last week was the
first time he has been aware that federal agen-
ts visited the University for such a purpose.
Heise said the State Department has writ en
letters asking that the University cooperate in
the Reagan administration's efforts to restrict
the access of communist scholars to research
material. The University, however, has not
cooperated with the Washington officials,
Heise said.
"THE UNIVERSITY failed to show sym-

pathy toward restrictions of knowledge," he
said.
The agents, on campus last week, questioned
a librarian at the Engineering-Transportation
library, where the Soviet scholar studies, and,
asked for records of what materials the
professor checked out. The librarian, Maurita
Holland, reportedly refused to give the agents
information, citing a University regulation
which prohibits the release of such infor-
mation.
Shapiro said he disapproved of the FBI's
method of gathering the information and said
he would prefer they consult him before

seeking information from the University's
libraries or other units.
"IT DOES POINT to a problem," he said.
"When people want information, they don't ask
the president, they just go all around the
system." Shapiro said there are regulatory
limits on how much information the University
can release on the activities of a scholar
without gaining the permission of the in-
dividual.
The FBI office in Detroit confirmed that
agents had questioned the librarian but refused
to comment further. An FBI spokesman
reached yesterday in the Bureau's headquar-

0

4

Ian Daily-Friday, February 19, 1982-Page-3"-
4
scholars
ters in Washington also declined comment
"I'm not at liberty to discuss it," said
spokesman Wiley Thompson.
"Usually, comments to the media are rarely,
if ever, made -while an investigation is iri
process," said Detroit FBI spokesman John
Anthony, who refused to say whether an aJx
vestigation of University scholars was under
way.
THE VISITING professor is Vladimir
Malyshko, who is studying graph theory at the
University. '
The world of communications is
changing at an unprecedented pace.
Hereis an industry where your fresh
ideas and energy will be welcome.
Satellite and cable technologies will
soon dominate the most vast
communications networkt
imaginable. You can contribute to
this exciting evolution when you join
our elite engineering community.R
Thinking strategically led us to our
position as an acknowledged
international leader in the design
and manufacture of equipment for
satellite communications, cable-
television, energy management, andf
home security systems. Scientific-
Atlanta's leadership extends to the
manufacture and sale of test and
measurement instruments for
industrial, telecommunication and
vernment an atinn

Time editor
-HAPPENINGS, brings varied

FRIDAY
HIGHLIGHTS
Original Oriental art treasures will be exhibited and sold by Marson Ltd.
of Baltimore today from 10 a.m' to 5 p.m. The oldest prints date back to the
18th and 19th centuries and include Chinese woodcuts, Indian miniature
paintings and manuscripts and master works. A representative will be
present to answer questions as you browse. The price range is wide, and the
collection will be located in the Michigan Union.
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Coop-Sextoons,8:30 p.m., Erotic Film Festival, 7 & 10:20
p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Guild-An American in Paris, 9 p.m., The Gay Divorcee, 7 p.m.,
Lorch Hall.-
Alternative Action-You Can't Take It With You, 7 p.m., Mr. Deeds Goes
to Town, 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Cineina II-Wuthering Heights, 7 & 9 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Mich. Theatre- The King and I, Radio City at the Michigan, 8 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Piano Recital, Timothy Hoekman, DMA, 8 p.m-., Recital
Hall.
SPEAKERS'
Ctr. for Near Eastern Studies-Joseph Van Ess, "Freedom and Ad-
,mission: Some Observations on Early Islamic Theology," 4 p.m., Frieze
Bldg., Rm. 3050.
School of Metaphysics-Free Lecture, "Your Power to Heal," 7:30 p.m.,
1029 Fountain.
Ctr. for South and Southeast Asian Studies-Linda Lim, "Singapore Suc-
cess: The Myth of the Free Market Economy," 12 p.m., Lane Hall Commons
Room.
Natural Resources-William Ruckelshaus, "The Development and Im-
plementation of Federal Environmental Policy," 3-5 p.m., 1040 Dana Bldg.
South and Southeast Asian Studies, Linguistics, Buddhist Studies-Jagan-
nath Upadhyaya, "The Importance of Buddhist Studies for Understanding
Indian Culture," in Sanskrit (with Translation), 4 p.m., W. Conf. Rm.,
Rackham.
Nuclear Eng. - Colloquium, 3:45 p.m., White Aud., Cooley.
MEETINGS
Int'l Student Fellowship-Mtg. open to all foreign students, 7 p.m., 4100
Nixon Rd.
National Student Speech Hearing Land. Assoc.-mtg., noon, VV Bldg.,
Comm. Disorders Clinic, ground floor coffee lounge.
Regents-mtg., 9 a.m., Regents Rm., Fleming Ad. Bldg.
MISCELLANEOUS
Lively Fridays-Double Shot Rangers, 8:30 p.m., "U" Club, Union.
Folk Dance Club-Folk Dance Instruction, 8-9:30 p.m.; Request Dancing,
9:30-midnight, Union.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class-class, 7:30 p.m., Univ. Reformed Church.
Univ. Duplicate Bridge Club-open game, 7:30 p.m., League.
Library Science-A Michigan Libraries Forum, "The Challenge of
Technology in the 80s," 8:30 a.m., UM School of Dentistry, Kellogg Foun-
dation Institute.
SATURDAY
HIGHLIGHT
Crystal Ball, an expansion project sponsored by the School of
Metaphysics, includes food, entertainment, dancing, and floor show starts at
7:30 p.m. at 1029 Fountain tonight. For more information call 996-1363.
FILMS.
Cinema II-Lost Horizon, 7 p.m., The Prince and the Pauper, 9:05 p.m.,
Aud. A, Angell.
Cinema Guild-San Francisco, 7 p.m., It Happened One Night, 9:10 p.m.,
Lorch Hall.
Ann Arbor Film Coop-Images, 7 p.m., Don't Look Now, 9 p.m., MLB 3.
MEETINGS
Ann Arbor Go Club-mtg., 2-7 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
WCBN-FM 88.3-Patchwork: A folk music radio show of Irish, British, and
American music hosted by Adam Price and. Jeanne Greenblatt, 11 a.m.-1
p.m.
Women's Basketball-Mich. vs. Dayton (Post Men's game), Crisler
Arena.
Men's Basketball-Mich. vs. Iowa, 4 p.m., Crisler Arena.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

-background
to Marsh,
lectures
By SCOTT STUCKAL
Christopher Porterfield - literature
professor, reporter, television
producer,and arts critic -already has
had a rich and varied career. Porter-
field's latest occupation, however,
brings him to campus as a visiting
University professor.
Porterfield, currently an arts
reviewer for Time magazine, came to
campus last week as a Marsh professor
in the Communication department, a
visit sponsored by the National En-
dowment for the Humanties. During his
weeklong stay, Porterfield gave
several lectures on his career in print
and video journalism and on mass
media's future.
COMPARING HIS WORK in
television and magazines, Porterfield
said, "In television you are under more
pressure from station managers and
different station officials. Magazines
have a way of buffering you against
this."
Porterfield, who formerly produced
Dick Cavett's public television inter-
view program, said the pressure in-
volved in television is a unique factor.
"You have a terrible sense of the
See 'TIME', Page 5

COMMUNICATING

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Careers In C
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You will share this
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If you are an ELECTRICAL
ENGINEER and have an interest in
design work in the hardware or
software areas,,visit your placement
office and arrange to meet with us on
March 3& 4
-or contact our Corporate
Employment Department at
1-800-241-5346.

Scientific
A tlanta

SCIENlTIFIC-ATLANTA
One Technology Parkway
P.O. Box 105600
Atlanta, Georgia 30348
An Equal Opportunity
Employer M/F/V/H

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TRW will be on campus March 2 & 3

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Bldg. R5/B196, Dept.l
One Space Park Drive
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Scientil
UM 3/82
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ther reason
taking shape
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to interview graduates in Engineering and
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Wanted: Cunsuor for Day Camp in Israel
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