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February 18, 1982 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

A

SSPORTS
The Michigan Daily Thursday, February 18, 1982 Page 8

a0

Blue set for tough OSU rematch

By BOB WOJNOWSKI
Special to the Daily
COLUMBUS- To stop Ohio State's
Buckeyes you have to stop the snap,
crackle and pop of Kellogg-Clark
Kellogg that is. And stopping the
Buckeyes' superlative junior forward is
not easy.
"You've just got to work like the
devil to keep him off the boards," said
Michigan coach Bill Frieder in referen-
ce to Kellogg. "And keeping him off the
boards is the key. It all starts with
Kellogg-he's the best player in the
league.'"
THAT IS the task at hand for the
Wolverine cagers as they invade St.
John's Arena for tonight's game again-
st Ohio State. Michigan, winner of four
of its last six, will be facing an equally-
surging Buckeye squad that won a pair
of road games last week and is 7-5 in the
league and 16-8 overall. And, according
to Frieder, the fact that Ohio State is.
still in the Big Ten title hunt will make,
it that much more difficult for his
Wolverines to escape with a win.
"They'll be tough in Columbus,
especially since they won two road
games last week," said the Michigan
coach. "And they think they can still,
win the Big Ten title and get into the
tournament."
Kellogg also thinks that the NCAA
tournament is a definite possibility, but
he shies away from predicting a Big
Ten title.
" THINK we can finish in the top
three (in the Big Ten)," he said. "But
we can't control our destiny as far as
the title goes."
The Buckeyes will be doubly toughi

because Michigan defeated them three
weeks ago, 62-60, on Dan Pelekoudas'
game-winning jumper. That win snap-
ped the Wolverines' 11-game losing
streak and sent them on their current
winning ways.
'Ohio State will go with basically the
same lineup that it used against the

Wolverines last time, with Kellogg,
averaging 15.3 points and 10.6 rebounds
per game, anchoring a front line that
includes 6-11 junior center Granville
Waiters and 6-6 sophomore forward
Tony Campbell.
ONE CHANGE will be at guard,
where 6-3 junior Larry Huggins will

THE LINEUPS
MICHIGAN OHIO STATE

start opposite 5-11 freshman guard
Troy Taylor. Freshman Ron Stokes,
who started against Michigan the last
time out, will come off the bench and
should see equal duty in the backcourt.
Michigan will counter with a frontline
of senior captain Thad Garner, who is
sixth in the league in scoring with a 14.5
ppg average, -center Ike Person, ninth
in the league in field goal percentage
and third in rebounding with 6.8 per
game, and 6-8 Willis Carter, who should
bolster the Wolverines' outmanned
frontline.
The backcourt combination will once
again feature 6-3 freshman Eric Tur-
ner, second in the Big Ten in assists,
and sophomore Dan Pelekoudas, who
beat the Buckeyes earlier.
Michigan is coming off its first road
victory of the year, a 45-44 win, over
Northwestern last Saturday. The
cagers are 4-8 in the Big Ten and 5-15
overall.

Fish Tales
By MARK FISCHER
Hoops over vacation..

6;

(5-15)

IN

(16-8)

(45) Thad Garner (6-7) ...... F ..... (33) Clark Kellogg (6-7)
(15) Willis Carter (6-8) ...... F ... (00) Tony Campbell (6-6)
(52) Ike Person (6-7) ........ C (13) Granville Waiters (6-11)
(25) Eric Turner (6-3) ...... G .... (20) Larry Huggins (6-3)
(32) Dan Pelekoudas (6-1) .. G ..... (14) Troy Taylor (5-11)
Game Time & Site: 8:10 p.m., St. John's Arena, Columbus.
Radio: WAAM-AM 1600, WWJ-AM 95, WUOM-FM 91.7

Kellogg:,C
By RON POLLACK
Special to the Daily
COLUMBUS - If ever there was a
player who is easy to spot in a basket-
ball game, it is Ohio State forward
Clark Kellogg. Merely look at the
player who has just pulled down a
rebound, and a good bet is that it is the
6-7, 227-pound Buckeye.,
There may be Big Ten performers
that are considerably taller than
Kellogg, but none are better on the

~airman of
boards. Last season he led the Big Ten
in rebounding, and he looks like he will
pace the conference again. Hs current
average of 11.5 caroms per game in
conference play places him well ahead
of Wisconsin's Brad Sellers, who ranks
second in the Big Ten with 8.7. Kellogg
is averaging 10.6 rebounds overall this
season.,
"THE DIFFERENCE between
myself and other rebounders is that I go
after so many rebounds," said Kellogg.
"Some guys don't go after rebounds
that aren't in their area. I try to go after
every rebound.
"Basically, I just use good timing and
jumping ability. I take a lot of pride in
my rebounding. I stay real active and I
have a sense for where the ball is

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the boards
going."
Although Kellogg's rebounding
average is almost identical to last
year's, he feels that he has improved
his game around the basket.
"I'VE BEEN HITTING the offensive
boards hard, and this year I haven't
rushed my shots after I get a rebound,"
he said. "In the past, I did rush my
shots and I didn't convert after I got the
rebound. But this year I'm converting
more." This assesment holds true
statistically, as Kellogg has upped his
.481 shooting percentage of last year to
a much more impressive .520 going into
tonight's game against Michigan.
Another difference between this and
last season can be found at center for
Ohio State. Last year's starting center
Herb Williams has moved on to pro
ball, and at times this has made
Kellogg's job easier.
"This year there's a little more room
in the pivot for me to work because we
don't have a low-post center like Herb
Williams," said Kellogg. "Now that
Granville (Waiters) is starting, we
have a high-post center. This gives me
more room to get the offensive boards."
But just as the departure of Williams
has opened up the middle for Kellogg, it
has also brought about some unwanted
attention. "Opponents try to collapse on
me when I get the ball," he said.
"Every now and then, when I get the
ball close to the basket, they try to close
things up on me by bringing a guard or
another forward over to double-team
me.,

1

Thursday, February 18
3200 S.A.B.
1-4:30 PMr

students the real losers
IT'S GREAT TO be a student at a Big Ten university if you're a basketball
fan, isn't it? The conference always produces such great teams (three of
the last six national champions) and awesome players (Earvin Johnson,
Kevin McHale, Isiah Thomas), that even if your school's team isn't the
greatest (Michigan, at 5-15 overall, 4-8 in the league, isn't the greatest), you
still get to watch some of the nation's best when they come to visit.
Or do you? t
For many Michigan students this year, the answer is no. Oh, the "nation's
best" are coming all right. Iowa (18-3, 10-2 conference for first place),
ranked sixth in the nation, will face the Wolverines in Crisler Arena this
Saturday. Eighth-ranked Minnesota (17-4, 9-3, second place) will be here the
following Thursday. And Bobby Knight and the 20th-ranked defending
national champion Hoosiers of Indiana (14-7, 8-4, third place) will come to
town the Saturday after that. But if you're planning to take a vacation from
the cold grey slush of Ann Arbor during Spring Break, you won't-be here to
see any of these games.
That's right, when the Big Ten's top three teams-the three best teams
Michigan will play this year, three of the better teams in the country-come
to play the Wolverines at home, most Michigan students will be miles away,
at home themselves, or skiing on some faraway mountain slope, or lying in
some Southern sun.
Naturally, not all of those students are happy about it. "The schedule has
done a lot to detract-from student activities," said LSA senior Jimmy Men-
delson, a sportscaster for the University's Campus Broadcasting Network.
"I've been going to basketball games and broadcasting games for four
years. I was promised one of the big games, this being my last year, and now
I can't do it because I'll be away on break this year. I'm peeved."
Greg Schiller, another LSA seior and four-year season ticket-holder, was
slightly less emotional, but critical nevertheless. "All the Big Ten schedule-
makers had to do was realize that the three best teams will be here when a
lot of students won't," said Schiller. "The schedule-makers should have
taken that into consideration."
It's a computer world
But the Big Ten's schedule-maker can't feel Mendelson's frustration or
take into account Schiller's opinion-that is, unless it is programmed to do
so.
"For football and basketball the schedule is set up at the Big Ten office by
a computer," said Michigan Athletic Director Don Canham. "Spring breaks
aren't taken into account; the only limitation is the exam periods.
"We have nothing to say about it. There's no other way you can do it.
There's no way you can make sure everybody is satisfied every season."
Maybe, maybe not. Still, there's no apparent reason Michigan couldn't be
satisfied, at least this season, because its Spring Break ends a full three
weeks before the vacations of seven of the other nine conference teams even
begin. That's two weeks before Illinois' break (March 13-23), and a week
before Purdue's (March 6-15). In fact, all of the other schools' vacations
come after the Big Ten campaign is well over, with the exception of Pur-
due's, which begins on the season's last day (Saturday, March 6).
Certainly, scheduling three home games during the spring break of the
only Big Ten school with a vacation during the conference season could have
been avoided, with just a little extra time or effort on the part of the people
who programmed the computer in the first place.
Still, nobody is too worried about the whole issue at Michigan's Athletic
Department. According to Athletic Ticket Manager Al Renfrew, who "didn't
even realize" the scheduling mishap "until about a week ago," students pur-
chased only 1,400 of the 8,000 season tickets sold for basketball this year.
Cohsequently, said Renfrew, the Spring Break scheduling conflict "is only
going to affect a very small amount of the crowd anyway. The real hard core
fans are perennial students who live here anyway."
Michigan's untimely break isn't exactly bringing Canham to tears either.
"The crowds are always affected (during vacations), and we'd much rather
have the students here," said the A.D. "On the other hand, a lot more town-
speople may come if they know we have seats.
"From a media standpoint," said Michigan Sports Information Director
John Humenik, "the home games still have to be covered. The Iowa game is
on USA (cable TV). Indiana is a big name which always brings a lot of media
people out. From the standpoint of the overall public, the team's exposure
won't really be hurt."
Humenik added that the three games should attract a lot of fans because of
Michigan's recent success (the Wolverines have won four of their last six)
and the visiting opponents' reputations. "They're a young team which is
finally coming together, going against big name teams," he said. "That's a
challenge which creates a lot of interest . . . We're hoping the enthusiasm
will catch on with the students."
Even Bill Frieder, Michigan's coach, said "I haven't thought about it"
when asked about the students' pending absence from the Spring Break con-
tests. "Let's hope some of the students get back for the games."
But somehow it all doesn't make sense. Michigan plays its three most at-
tractive homegames while the students are away and nobody at the Athletic
Department really seems to care.
Aren't collegiate teams tied to and supported by the universities they sup-
posedly represent? And aren't universities supposed to be based around
their students?
Unfortunately, those kinds of questions have become not only passe but
naive in this day and age of major college sports. Michigan athletics aren't
s ported by the University; thanks to the multi-million dollar revenue in
a ertising, souvenirs, and gate receipts supplied by the football and
basketball programs, Michigan athletics support themselves.
Matriculating Michigan students never make up more than a fraction of
the throng of 100,000-plus paying fans at each football game; and as noted
earlier, not more than 1,400 of the 8,000 season ticket-holders that have been
attending basketball games this year.
So why should the Go Blue Machine care about students?

University Family Housing
Apartments and Townhouses
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE
Spring-Summer and Fall, 1982
TO MOVE IN BEFORE JUNE 15
APPLY BEGINNING MARCH 1

6'

6

II.

Kellogg
... league's leading rebounder

Michigan Basketball Statistics

CLARKE OUTQOOR SPRAYING CO. inc.
COMMUNITY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROGRAMS
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Player
Garner................ ...............
Turner ...................................
Person ................................
Rockymore............. ................
Hopson .......................................
Pelekoudas ....................................
Carter ........ ................ ........
Rudyn................................ ......
Brown........ ................ ................
Hall.............. ....................
Team ....................................

G-S
20-20
20-20
20-20
20-6
20-12
20-16
20-1
6-0
10-0
8-0

FG-FGA
106-235
107-234
81-168
65-142
49-93
37 82
25-67
2-3
2-4
1-4

Pct
.451
.457
.482
.458'
.527
.451
.373
.667
.500
.250

FT-FTA
5748
49-85
25-38
21-27
18-43
22-31
5-8
0-0
0-1
0-0

Pct
.731
.576
.648
.778
.419
.710
.625
.000

REB-AvG Pts Avg

135-6.7
47-2.4
130-6.5
54-4.5
73-6.1
29-1.5
37-3.1
1-0.2
2-0.2
3-0.4
'68

269 13.5
263 13.2
189 9.5
151 7.6
116 5.8
96 4.8
55 2.8
4 0.7
4 0.4
2 0.3

I

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MICHIGAN ..... ............................ 20 498-1084 .459 205-320 .641 603-30.2* 120160.1
OPPONENTS ...... . .. ...... ....20 521-1053 A95 279-419 .663 649-32.5* 132166.1
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offer expires March 1st
GOOD LUCK
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6
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