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February 12, 1982 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-12

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Engineers
Feb. 15-
Sundstrand On Campus
As a leading high technology company, Sundstrand is
involved in the design, manufacture, and sale of advanced
electrical, mechanical, and electro-mechanical systems
for all U.S. commercial jets, current military programs,
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and service network throughout the world.
If you are interested in a creative engineering environment
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investigate Sundstrand. We offer competitive salaries,
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reimbursement program.
Sundstrand is headquartered in Rockford, a major
business center in northern Illinois offering a variety of
recreational, educational, and cultural opportunities as
well as employment opportunities for spouses.
On-Campus interviewer .................Mike Trotter
SUNDSTRAND
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Rockford, IL 61101
An Equal Opportunity Employer

Page 6-Friday, February 12, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Haig asks for solution of Moroccan conflict

MARRAKECH, Morocco (AP)-
Secretary of State Alexander Haig is
telling Morocco a prompt settlement of
its Sahara war with Polisario guerrillas
is essential to keep Libyan leader
Moammar Khadafy from meddling
directly in the conflict.
Haig arrived yesterday for a 24-hour
visit that includes a meeting with King
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Hassan II, who has a close relationship
with Washington. Haig, who just com-
pleted talks in Lisbon with Portuguese
leaders, will go to Bucharest, Romania,
today in an attempt to bring further
pressure on Moscow and Warsaw to end
the military crackdown in Poland.
A U.S. OFFICIAL told a reporter the
Reagan administration believes
Hassan must follow up on his own peace
initiative to end Morocco's long war
against Polisario guerrillas in the
western Sahara.
Algeria is backing the Polisario

guerrillas in the war, which followed
the Spanish withdrawal from the
western Sahara in 1974. "We will say
that this is a war that serves nobody's
interest and it really would be an ex-
cellent thing to push for a strategy of
peace and stability in the area," said
the official, who insisted he not be iden-
tified.
Khadafy is scheduled to take over as
chairman of the Organization of
African Unity when the OAU holds its
next annual meeting in Tripoli this
summer. The OAU, with U.S. support,

had been instrumental in trying to end
the war for dominance in the western
Sahara.
THE OAU approved a peace proposal
put forward by Hassan that calls for a'
cease-fire and a referendum to settle
the conflict. The Polisario was not hap-
py, but went along.
The United States is officially neutral, : -
on who should eventually govern in the
western Sahara. But it supports Moroc-
co's claim to administer the territory
pending a final outcome and allows.
Morocco to use U.S.-supplied arms .

Student unity, urged to fight aid cuts
- - rinIM itl .ih affn bq to inte.res~tsuet

(Continued from Page 1)
ning cutbacks in financial aid, student
leaders there are still focusing their ef-
forts on educating fellow students about
the cutbacks. He said that WMU
leaders have not yet concerned them-
selves with organizing any large-scale
campaigns to combat the cutbacks.
WHILE WMU is just getting started,
Oakland University students have
organized a letter-writing campaign
and a petition drive, and have mailed
warnings about the cutbacks to alumni
and parents of students.
The efforts have been successful, ac-
cording to Oakland student Phillip Ray,
but students there "are finding it hard
to come up with new ideas" to rally

Sllnnrrtfor their inhhving effort CUPIU 'Vt ULULW 11LU UM LMAVa.

In Ann Arbor, students from MSA's
financial aid committee, which helped
organize yesterday's conference,
suggested that the students endorse a
gubernatorial candidate and state and
federal representatives. Some MSA
members also discussed obtaining the
voting records of Congressmen on key
education issues to distribute to studen-
ts.
OTHER STUDENTS added that
schools should participate in voter
registration drives on campus-similar
to the one currently being conducted on
the Ann Arbor campus-although most
agreed that the drives would have to be

in actually voting for strong supporters
of higher education.
"You can get them registered, but
you can't get them to the polls," Alpena
Commupity College student Tode Bor-
dewyk said.
Bordewyk said his school was con-
sidering a letter-writing campaign and
letters to the editors of local
newspapers as methods of combating
cuts to financial aid and school funding.
Students from all four schools said
they had received the support of their
administrations in their efforts, and
discussed the possibility of sending in-
formation directly to students currently
receiving financial aid.
d by officials

Financial aid cuts proteste

(Continued fromPage 1)
"IT DOESN'T serve as a palient for
one bit," he said of the reduced cut-
backs. "We must go forward to reverse
this entirely."
The cuts will accentuate a class
system in the United States, according

city
ASchooL

State

Zip

M-

Ii

star rng
Miller High Life

to Sussman, because the poor and the
middle class will be the hardest hit.
"The pool-of talent from which we can
draw our students would be severely af-
fected," he said.
Pursell, who is a member of the
House Appropriations sub-committee,
praised the students for their concern.
"I THINK you have national sup-
port," he told the audience. "Students
can make the difference:"
"We're redoubling our effort and
fine-tuning our strategy," Pursell said
of his committee which has recommen-
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For information, Please Call
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ded a shift of funds from defense to
various social programs.
If -even $10 billion or $15 billion were R
diverted from the defense budget to
student aid, the government would be
able to maintain the present level of all
financial aid programs, he said.
"HIGHER education should.not be a
luxury for the wealthy: Students will
not have access to an education and
schools will not be as diverse," warned
MSA President Jon Feiger, adding that
the country will feel the pinch of today's
cutbacks ten years from now.
Reiterating that student aid
programs must be a national priority,
Feiger also claimed that ROTC
scholarships are increasing because of
the large defense budget and that
Reagan, in effect, is forcing students to
join the military in order to finance
their educations.
"Students are the leaders of',
tomorrow," he said. "The future is in
our hands."
Support the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

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