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February 11, 1982 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-11

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e

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 11, 1982'-Page 7

U-Cellar's move from Union
ends chapter in rocky history

Reagan defends

As the University Cellar prepares to
leave its home 'of 10 years, many
students who did not witness the store's
genesis are unaware of its controver-
sial history.
The Regents' approval to fund a
student bookstore was a product of the
activism of the late '60s. Students at the
time complained of uniformly high tex-
tbook and academic supply prices
charged by the local bookstores. Ac-
cording to various histories written
about the U-Cellar, few discounts were
offered on essential items.
Although several student groups had
started limited cooperatives to take
some of the bite out of high prices, ac-
tivists believed a student bookstore
would be the most efficient method of
discounting'books and supplies.
NUMEROUS proposals failed to gain

the Regents' approval; the issue
aroused so much concern on campus
that students organized a sit-in at the
Administration Building to protest the
delays. The demonstration ended in 107
arrests and a University-wide student
strike.
In early 1970, the Regents approved
the legal blueprint for the University
Cellar. In addition to a one-time
allocation of $100,000, the board allowed
the Student Government Council
(forerunner of the present-pay
Michigan Student Assembly) to ask
students to assess themselves five
dollars-refundable when they left the
University-to provide further capital
for the store.
AFTER A short while, the Cellar
established 'a line of credit to expand

from art and general supplies to major
book sales at a competitive level. Soon
the store was consistently underpricing
local sellers, and by 1974 was offering
textbook discounts.
John Sappington, the U-Cellar's
assistant general manager, said em-
ployees consider the store relatively
autonomous, financially, of the Regents
and the University administration.
"We look at it as that we've paid back
the original capital through our rent
payments to the Union," he said.
-The U-Cellar moved into its current
Michigan Union baserment location
about 10 years ago. Previous locations
included what is now the Union study
room and, before that, a small area in
the Student Activities Building.
-Janet Rae

From staff and wire reports
WASHINGTON- President
Reagan, refused yesterday to retreat
from his policies for reducing in-
flation in the years ahead, even
though he acknowledged the nation
must endure the highest unem-
ployment in decades and aprecession
along the way.
In an economic report to Congress,
the president also held firmly to his
record deficit budget plan and predic-
ted that his tax-cut medicine would
nurse the nation back to a "vigorous
economic recovery" later this year.
The White House also flatly rejected,
yesterday a Democrat's call for a vir-
tual freeze on Pentagon spending
while trimming by half the ad-

ministration's three-year tax cut.
BUT DESPITE the claim by
presidential spokesman tarry
Speakes that Sen. Ernest Hollings (D-
S.C.) "hasn't put up," the Senate's top
two Republicpn leaders found merit in
the counterplan to Reagan's big-
deficit budget.
Majority Leader Howard Baker (R-
Tenn.), in his most notable detour to
date from Reagan's game plan,
declared the Hollings proposal "in-
te'resting and worthwhile." And his
deputy, Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska,
agreed that "It merits a lot of con-
sideration.",
Hollings said his alternative could
cut Reagan's projected deficit of'$91.5
billion for 1983 to $42 billion, and

butdg
produce a surplus in- 1985, the year
Reagan forecasts a deficit of $&Z
billion.
THE PLAN calls for a one-year,
freeze on defense spending at current
levels, elimination of one year's cost
of-living increases for Social Security
and government pension recipients;
and major reductions in the threeg
year tax cut plan Congress approved
last summer.
In Ann Arbor, Economics Professor
Gardner Ackley, an adviser in the
Johnson administration, said, "I don't
regard the (Reagan) budget as being-
very satisfactory." The third stage of,
the tax cut should be cancelled, he
said.

Cellar plans move by June 15

(Continued from Page 1)
Cellar will remain affiliated with the
University.,
"IT'S VERY important to maintain
our ties," Caballero said. Since the U-
Cellar was created as a service to the
entire University community, she said,_
it should receive input from faculty and
administrative personnel as well as
students.
Ats present, the U-Cellar is a non-
profit corporation headed by a board of
directors consisting of seven students
appointed by the Michigan Student
Assembly, three faculty members, two
representatives of the International
Worker's of the World Union (the of-
ficial bargaining agent for U-Cellar
employees), and one University ad-
ministrator.
The Board, according to theU-
dellar's Assistant Manager John Sap-
pington, has "ownership, per se" of the
store.
"THE BOARD EXISTS to satisfy the

needs of students and the University
community," Sappington said. "We
view students as our stockholders, and
we provide returns to them in the form
of discounted prices."
In response to concerns that the new
site may be too distant to draw students
away from central campus, the Board
has discussed the possibility of
organizing a free shuttle bus to the store
from dormitories and fraternity-
sorority areas during book rushes.
They also said they hope to even further
discount the price of textbooks to at-
tract customers to the new store:
"IF IT (THE shuttle) is a success, it
would be nice to implement it year-
round," Caballero said. "As of yet,
there are no formal proposals before
the Board but we are talking about it."
Caballero said the Board also intends
.to launch a publicity campaign to per-
suade students of the importance of
maintaining a strong student-run

bookstore.
"We want students to buy into their
store," Caballero said. "We want
them to realize that (by moving out) we
did what we had to in the best interests
of the students."
THERE ARE advantages to the new
location beyond financial savings,
Caballero said. In the Union, the U-
Cellar is not permitted to- sell insignia
("M-Go-Blue") items and the sale of all
other items is subject to Cianciola's ap-
proval.
"The insignia people (wholesalers)
are going to go wild," Caballero said.
She said the board is also discussing
expanding into a number of new mer-
chandise lines, including clothing and
more general audience books.
In addition, the U-Cellar will be able
to display textbooks year-round, rather
than setting up a separate operation
each term as had been done in the
Union ballroom during book rush.

Help Prevent
Birth Defects -
The Nation's
Number One
Child Health
Problem.
Support the
March of
~Dmes
BIRTH DEFECTS
FOUNDATION

I

STU DENTS
a FACULTY
STAFF
NOMINATE OUTSTANDING TEACHERS, RESEARCHERS,
AND COUNSELORS FOR A FACULTY AWARD:
ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: For Associate and Full Pro-
fessors.
RECOGNITION AWARD: For Assistant, Associate and
Junior Full Professors.
AMOCO OUTSTANDING TEACHER AWARD: For Regu-
lar Faculty Who Have Demonstrated Excellence
in Undergraduate Teaching.
TEACHING ASSISTANT AWARD: For Effective and
Creative Graduate Teaching Assistants.
SEE YOUR DEPARTMENT CHAIR FOR NOMINATION FORMS
OR CALL 764-8323
ALL NOMINATIONS DUE: FEBRUARY 19,.1982

Blood drive averts shortage

By NATHANIEL WARSHAY
Low turnout at the Alpha Phi Omega
bloodmobile on campus this week
nearly resulted in a "blood emergency"
for much of southeastern Michigan, ac-
cording to Red Cross officials.
Thee emergency was avoided when
yesterday's goal of 300 pints was nearly
achieved, according to Neal Fry, blood
coordinator of the Washtenaw County
Legal battle
begins over
* 'U' prof's
testimony
(continued from Page 1)
researchers, according to Davis.
Snyder is "a stranger to the case and
has a property right in his expertise and
research, and can't be forced to
testify," he said.
The University is representing
pSnyder because the. case is "a
precedent from our point of view," said
Bill McCormick, assistant director of
the University's Highway Safety
Research Institute.
"Requiring a researcher to produce
raw data has very many implications,
especially if it (the research) is con-
fidential," McCormick said. If Snyder
is forced to testify, he explained, "any
expert in any field could be required to,
testify against this will."
According to, Davis, AMC "has no
standing, since they didn't file the sub-
poena. If we lose there is the im-
plication that anybody can be forced to
testify," and this would be "an in-
tolerable result," he said.

Red Cross.
The Red Cross depends on the cam--
pus bloodmobile to provide one-third of
the -blood needed this week at
Washtenaw, Wayne, Oakland,
Macomb, and St. Clair counties, accor-
ding to Fry. If not enough blood is
donated, elective surgery must be
delayed or cancelled, she said.
Fry attributed the dependence on the
campus blood drive to the severely
depressed economic conditions in this
part of the state. "We're feeling a great
loss of donors because of the layoffs of

the automobile industry," she said.
"They were a large source of our sup-
ply."
The layoffs have severely reduced
the number of donors at the auto fac-
tories, she explained, and the campus
drive must supply 300 of the 900 pints of
blood used each day at the 75 hospitals
in the five-county area.
This week's drive has fallen far below
expectations, according to volunteer
Don Fellows. "Donations have been
going down steadily," he said, while the
demand has risen."

op,

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- 4

r r r
Restaurant and Bar

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r _

A

Genera
HOSP~aI

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MAL

SOFT
ON SOAPS?*
Don't miss
the General
Hospital
Happy Hour

Will Luke and Laura find
happiness? Will Heather
beat the rap? Will Lila lose
the Quartermaine millions?
Find out each day at 3 p.m. as
the Stage Door tunes in to the
latest episode of GH murder,
money, marriage and mayhem.
Along with your favorite cast of
characters, we'll have quiet.
comfortable seating. And
Happy Hour Drink prices.

Invitation to:
Engineering (E.E., M.E., I.E.)
Computer Science
Business Administration (M.B.A.)
Students and Faculty
COME
MEET OUR
CORPORATE
VICE PRESIDENT-
FINANCE
A University of Michigan alumnus, now
the chief financial officer of a major
Fortune 300 Corporation, returns to
his alma mater to discuss career
opportunities at Harris Corporation.
Paul S. Brentlinger, M.B.A. graduate of
(. of M and now the Vice President-Finance
for Harris Corporation, will host an Open
House on Thursday. February I f from
6:30-9:00 p.m. at the Sheraton University
Inn. Grand Ill Room. Engineering, Computer
Science and Business Administration
students, and faculty are cordially invited to
attend. Refreshments will be served. Don't
miss this opportunity to personally discuss
careers in the dynamic high technology
electronics environment with one of the
nation's leading financial executives and
several top technical and financial
managers. On campus interviews will be
held at the Business and Engineering
Placement Centers on Friday, February 12.

Paut S. Brentlinger

The General Hospital Happy Hour:'Monday-Friday, 3-6 p.m.,
only at the Stage Door. Hospital Whites Optional.
300 S. Thayer 769-3042 * Inside the Bell Tower Hotel.

L

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Mon-Sat 10-5:30; Thurs, Fri until 8 nickels arcade
SPRING BREAK-SPECIALS

Harris Corporation today:
Harris is a producer of high-tech-
nology communication and information.
processing systems, equipment, and
components. The company's products,
which are used in voice and video
communication, data processing,
data communication, and graphic
communication, are sold in more than
100 nations of the world. In fiscal
1981, Harris had sales of $1.6 billion,
employed 26,000 people and operated
40 plants in the United States,
Canada, Europe, and Asia.

IZOD MEN'S & WOMEN'S
SHIRTS 20% OFF

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