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February 10, 1982 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-10

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 10, 1982-Page 3

LSA committee questions drop/add fee

By KENT REDDING
The University's new $10 late
drop/add fee was debated at yester-
day's LSA Curriculum Committee
meeting, as LSA officials criticized the
plan.
The new policy, which would charge
students $10 for each course they drop
or add after the announced deadline
was not thoroughly considered, said
Robert Wallin, director of LSA Check-
point.
ERNEST Zimmerman, assistant to
* the Vice President for Academic Af-
fairs, told the committee that late
drop/adds were costing the University

money.
The problem is nearly 6,000 students
drop or add courses after the deadline,
forcing the University to keep ad-
ditional workers at CRISP, said Zim-
merman.
Zimmerman said the fee, to be im-
plemented next fall, would be a
deterrent in addition to the 'W' students
now receive on their transcriptsfor late
drop/adds. The fee would also help pay
for the costs of extra CRISP staff
needed after the deadline, he said.
MEMBERS OF the committee
disputed Zimmerman and suggested
the new policy not only wouldn't deter

students, but it may actually increase
costs to the University.
"I doubt that a fee is going to be a
very persuasive deterrent," said
Charles Judge, director of Academic
Services, who addressed the commit-
tee. The 'W' on the transcript is a good
deterrent, said Judge, adding, "They
(students) certainly complain about
it."
Members also charged that the fee
will add to administrative costs as
departments and counselors try to
decide who would be exempt from the
fee.
"THE MORE (time) we spend on this
kind of thing, the less time we have for
important matters such as students'
concerns," said one member.
Zimmerman said he wasn't sure who
would qualify for fee exemptions. The

only exemptions now being considered
are late drop/adds that are the fault of
the, University, he said.
As the policy stands now, students
will have to pay the fee regardless of
any individual reason for missing the
deadline.
.Answering committee inquiries,
Zimmerman said, "This is not a money-
raising scheme. The money will go to
the general revenue fund."
ZIMMERMAN also said there is
evidence indicating that many students
drop/add late for no legitimate reason.
The committee chairman promised
to pursue the matter. "There's an awful,
lot of waffling," said Chairman Jens
Zorn, associate dean for curriculum
affairs. "We have to pin that down."
Wallin called the fee a "Reaganomic
revenue enhancer" that would only

cause problems for LSA. "I don't see
how any problem is going to be solved
by this," he said.
The committee plans to draft a letter
to the committee who originally
proposed the fee, stating their reser-
vatiors. and questions about it.

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News Staff'

~HAPPENINGS-
HIGHLIGHT
Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity is sponsoring a blood drive all week
long. Blood donations can be given at Markley, Couzens, and Bursley
residence halls, and at the Michigan Union during the morning and after-
noon.
FILMS
Meekreh and Lloyd Dorm-Cast a Giant Shadow, 9 p.m., Alice Lloyd Red
Lounge.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music- String Department Recital, Recital Hall, 8 p.m.; Flute/
Clarinet Recital, Jennifer Keeney on flute, Elizabeth Campieau on clarinet,
8 pm., Stearns
Canterbury Loft-"Jelly-Filled . . . A Portrait of a Paranoia," by Loren
Hech, 8 p.m., 332 S. State.
Theatre& Drama-"The Time of Your Life," 8 p.m., Power Center.
SPEAKERS
Ind. & Opers. Eng.- "Optimal Locations on a Line are Interleaved," Eric
Denardo, 4-5 p.m., 229 W. Eng.
Psychiatry- "Bereavement," Paula Calyton, 9:30-11 p.m., CPH Aud.
Psychiatry- "Depression and Professional Women," Paula Clayton, 1:30-
3 p.m., 1057 MHRI.
School of Education- "The Importance of Early Experience and Inter-
vention;" Nicholas Anastasiow, 4 p.m., Whitney Aud.
Afroamerican and African Studies- "Aspects of Caribbean Immigration
to the United States," Roy Bruce-LaPorte, 12p.m., 246 Lorch Hall.
Chemical Eng.- "Running Time-Shared Jobs in MTS," James Wilkes,
7:30-9:30 p.m., 421 W. Eng.
Chemistry- "Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry," Wlater Opdycke, 4
p.m., 1200 Chem; "The Chemistry of some Small-Ring Propellanes," Ed-
ward Ludwig, 4 p.m., 1300 Chem.
AIESEC- "Management in the Coming Years-Women in Business,"
Ronald Mercer, 12:30-2 p.m., 170 Business Administration.
College of Engineering- "Elementary theory of Neutron Acattering, I,"
Gerogr Smmerfield, 4 p.m., Baer Rm., Cooley Bldg.
Classical Studies- "Horace's Soracte Ode," Prof. H.D. Cameron, 4 p.m.,
2009 Angell Hall.
Romance Languages- "MIetafication and the Contemporary Spanish
Novel," Prof. David Herzberger, 4:10 p.m, Rackham West Conference
Room.
CREES- "The Puzzle of Ethnicity: Yugoslav Cases," Mark Baskin, 12
p.m., Commons Room, Lane Hall.
MEETINGS
Science Fiction Club- "Srilyagi Ari Corps," 8:15 p.m., Ground Floor Con-
ference Room, Michigan Union.
Commission for Women--12 p.m., 2549 LSA.
Polish American Student Association- organization meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Room B, Michigan League.
Greenpeace- 8p.m., Pendleton Room, Michigan Union.
Latin American Solidarity Committee- mass meeting, guest Beth Perry,
7:30 p.m., Anderson Rooms B and C, Michigan Union.
LSA-SG--6:15 p.m., third floor, Michigan Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Tau Beta Pi- free tutoring, 7-11 p.m., 307 UGLI; 8-10 p.m., 2232 Bursley.
WCBN- "Radio Free Lawyer: Discussion of Legal Issues," 6 p.m., 88.3
FM,..
Nursing Master Student Organ.- Pre-Valentine Day Party, 12-2 p.m., 400
N. Ingalls, Room 2184.
Transcendental Meditation- An Introduction, 8 p.m., 4313 Michigan
Union.
Hillel- "Our Lives: As Women and as Jews," panel discussions, 8:30
p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Int. Ctr.- "Traveling About within Europe," 12 p.m., 603 E. Madison.
UM Folklore Society- Clog Dance Class and Practice, beginning class
6:30-7 p.m., intermediate-advanced practice, 7-8 p.m., Michigan League
Studio.-
Society of Women Engineers- Pre-Interview Program, Hewlet Packard,
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Naval Surface Weapons Center, 1-4 p.m., 144 W. Eng.
Alpha-Phi Sorority- Sucker Sale, all day, Diag and Fishbowl.
English- Reading of Fiction by Ron Hansen, 4 p.m., Pendelton Room,
Michigan Union.
CEW- Counseling Group, "Onward and Upward," 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Ark-Open Mike Night, 9p.m., 421 Hill.
Housing Special Program- Soul Food Dfiner, Stockwell Diing Room,
4:30-6:30 p.m., "Bichinis Bia Congo," 6:30 p.m., Stockwell Hall Blue Lounge,
Mural Presentation, Jon Onye Lockard, Afro Lounge South Quad, 8 p.m.
Dharma Study Group- sitting meditation 7:30-8: 30 p.m., 206 S. Main #206.
PIRGIM, MSA, LSA-SG, TATU, College Democrats- Non-partisan Voters
Registration Drive, East Quad, South Quad, West Quad, Bursley.
Committee to Support Irish Political Prisoners, FLOC, National Lawyers'
Guild- The Patriot Game, speaker update on Northern Ireland, 7:30 p.m.,
Kuenzel Room Michigan Union.
Student Wood and Craft Shop- ower Tool Safety Class, 6 p.m., 537 SAB,
Thompson Street.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

arve hapiro blasts.
Reagan cuts on 'Today'

PUT !EM AWAY'
(t V' tl Ci'fl HV(N '\/10(1 W
:.r you r ( ties for (f]i
MAy yOu right flnllld yM
An t
JUST FOR A IDAYe.

By SUSAN SHARON
Warning of dire circumstances for
college students if President Reagan's
budget proposals are passed, Univer-
sity President Harold Shapiro appeared
on NBC's Today show yesterday mor-
ning.
During the three-minute interview
with Jane Pauley, Shapiro said that
universities across the nation are

threatened with the loss of one-third of
their financial aid for students.
"A college education will not be
available to (everyone) who is
academically qualified," Shapiro said,
adding "Some students will have to
leave college."
Shapiro gracefully ignored Paulef
each of the two times she referred to
him as "Harvey" Shapiro.

_
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