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February 05, 1982 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-05

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ARTS

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The Michigan Daily,

Friday, February 5, 1982

Page 7

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A selection of weekend entertainment highlights

Carroll's 'Movies' has m

iagic

Clubs/Bars
The Blind Pig (208 S. First; 996-
8555)
Jazz with the Wedidell Harrison
Quintet featuring Pamela Wise
tonight and tomorrow.
Halfway Inn (Church Street entran-
ce to East Quad; 764-8558)
Ann Arbor's own Flexibles are
back for one night only (Saturday).
As well as receiving favorable

Sreviews,the band's single, 'In-
tuition/Birth Effect," has been
selling well in certain areas,
especially the East Coast.
Joe's Star Lounge (109 N. Main;
665-JOES)
Once again Dick Siegel and the
Ministers of Melody will perform
R&B classics, early rockers, and
originals tonight and tomorrow. This
is a "don't miss" show because they
may not be playing anywhere again
until next weekend.
Mr. Flood's Party (120 W. Liberty;
995-2132)
Country tinged blues with Steve
Newhouse and White Line Fever
through tomorrow.
Rick's American Cafe (611 Church;
996-2747)
Tonight and tomorrow Rick's has
the distinct pleasure of hosting I-Tal,
the popular reggae band from
Cleveland (must be some mistake).
Get there early if you plan on getting
in.
Second Chance (516 E. Liberty;
994-5350)
Hey, uh, like rock 'n' roll with, uh,
Tight, you know? Everything from
AC/DC to Zepplin, OK? .
Concerts
Les Harvey Productions
Boogie with B.B. King Sunday

night at the Second Chance. This
show should be a fantastic; Mr.
Blues still has a rich and powerful
voice and plays guitar as well as he
ever did. Call 994-0600 for more in-
formation.
University Musical Society
Concert-goes here will experience
for the fourth time in recent years
what is universally acclaimed as the
best in Flamenco music when Carlos
Montoya performs at Hill
Auditorium February 6th.
On Sunday, the Orpheus Chamber
Orchestra will perform in the
Rackham Auditorium. The program
will consist of "Concerto in C, 'The
Feast of San Lorenzo' "by Vivaldi,
"Sinfonietta" by Britten, "I Crisan-
temi" by Puccini, and "Symphony
No. 49" ("La Passione") by Haydn.
For more information on both
concerts, call 665-3717.
Theater
Comic Opera Guild
La Vie Parisienne, by Jacques Of-
fenbach, runs through tomorrow
night at the Michigan Theater. This
delightful operetta concerns a man's '
innovative attempt to win the affec-
tions of a woman who happens to be
married. Said to have influenced the
creators of those wonderful Rock
Hudson/Doris Day flicks. (769-2852).
Department of Theater and Drama
Frederick Knott's spine-chilling
suspense thriller Dail "M" For
Murder continues through tomorrow
night. Even though Grace Kelly is not
playing Margot, it should be a good
show. 764-0450 for more information.
Performance Network
Italian social satirist Dario Fo ex-
plores the effects of inflation in We
Won't Pay! We Won't Pay! Using
broad humor to raise sharp
questions about society, the play
portrays the actions Italian people
took in 1974 to defend themselves
against inflation. 663-0681 for ticket
information.
Young Peoples Theater
Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain's im-
mortal story of a young boy's adven-
tures in a small town on the banks of
the Mississippi kicks off a series of
weekend performances during
February.
-compiled by Michael Huget

By James Clinton
I WAS AMONG the many who greatly
admired Jim Carroll's first book The
Basketball Diaries. That book
chronicles his experiences as a very
young man in New York, where he
simultaneously lived the life of a star
athlete and heroin addict. In addition to
serving up some wildly humorous
episodes, it explored much of the
terrain in a terse form of prose, just this
side of poetry. All the more impressive
is the fact that Carroll wrote this book
between the ages of thirteen and fif-
teen.
In New York and on the west coast,
Basketball Diaries brought him a wide
cult following and uncommon praise in
the literary community. Last year with
the release of his band's first album,
Catholic Boy, a more widespread
audience for his work emerged. To
capitalize on this, Penguin Books has
re-released his first volume of poetry,
Living at the Movies.
Originally published in 1973, the book

received uncommon praise and was
nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, but, as
is frequently the case, it failed to sell.
Hopefully it will do better now, as it's a
very fine work, particularly for a first
volume.
Carroll has a phenomenal ear and an
uncanny knack for arranging sounds
and images in an unorthodox fashion
that conforms to the natural rhythms of
his poems. His ability to get off lines
that are descriptive and singing is
reminiscent of the early Dylan, fusing
the primitive and the surreal with
astonishing virtuosity: "I'm so glad
and the wind is pushing like pinecones
against the angel's dying sperm."
Echoes of the beat poets are evident;
in particular his tendency to break off
the last line in an ironic and explosive
fashion reminds me of Gregory Corco's
better work, and the neo-diary format
and many thematic concerns resemble
Ginsberg's book, The Fall of America.
This is not to suggest that Living At The
Movies is derivitve, as Carroll had
cultivated such a style much earlier in
Diaries.
The tendency to place him in the

"New York School" of writers is
prevalent, but this owes more to the
territorial aspect of his work and seems
to be a thematic rather than a stylistic
designation. To be sure, there is a con-
fessional urgency inherent in these
poems, an underlying suggestion that
through the exploration and divulging
of one's personal excess, a redemptive
and pure focus will merge and liberate.
This can be attributed to his early
struggle against a deeply ingrained
sense of Catholicism.
The difference between Carroll and
some, of his contemporaries like Lou
Reed or Patti Smith (whom Carroll
greatly influenced) is that their work on
similar subjects is underwritten by a
direct refutation of guilt, whereas
Carroll's experience has its origins in
the confessional booth. This conflict
gives his work a more unifying and
ultimately engaging dimension than the
aforementioned.,
The subject matter here is similar to
the work in Diaries; the decadence of
.city life, the- ambiguous political ap-
proach to the counter culture and his
own struggle with narcotics.
On the latter subject, Carroll writes'
with uncommon strength, only William

Burroughs has . written with more:
illumination regarding heroin addic-
tion. Like Burroughs, Carroll seems to
have emerged from his struggle a bet-
ter man. He has traveled an alien road
and synthesized his experience with a
remarkable sense of insight.
In this work a more matter of fact
complacency emerges on the subject,
"I sit in my chair of nods shivering
from a sickness I took years to per-.
fect". Familiarity with the terrain may
be a prerequisite here, but. there is a
common linkage to all experience that
embraces much of the work, giving it
an overall texture representative of all
struggles.
Jim Carroll has all the signs of a true
poet. His ability to illuminate ordinary
experience with tremendous insight
and clarity is at times magical. He also
has a strong romantic sense of self and
translates his own existence into legend..
with poise and the added sense of ab-
surdity that balances the egocentricity
natural to his work. Finally, his,
capacity to discern beauty where
others see ugliness is his special gift.
That he can then shape such beauty,
thereby containing it, is what maks'
him what he is; a natural poet.

Opera Guild shines

MARTY'S ... GOES DUTCH TREAT WITH THEIR SEVENTH ANNUAL ..

By Robin James
T HE GAY times of Jacques Offen-
bach's Paris were re-enacted Wed-
nesday night when the Comic Opera
Guild presented his operetta, La Vie
Parisienne, at the Michigan Theater.
Offenbach's comedy, set in Paris in
the 1860's, concerns two Parisian men-
about-town in love with the same
womag, Metella. After she rejects theme
for another man, they spend the rest of
the operetta attempting to find ladies of
"fashion." In the end, the two dandies
find true love, and all is well.
The prominent dandy, Raoul de Gar-
defeu (Sam Roelofs) was a convincing
trickster who, though trying to win over
the Baroness, realized love was not to
be fooled. Raoul, along with his friend
Bobinet's first love Metella (Lisa Ray
Turner), were dominating forces on
stage. Turner interpreted her charac-
ter with the appropriate amount of
playfulness and skepticism toward the.
men. Baroness Christine (Marilyn
Kennedy), Raoul's "lady of fashion,"
portrayed her character with ease,
and actually seemed to detest her
"husband," the all-too-American Bar-
ton Gandermack (Wayne Morrow).
Two unforgettable members of the
cast were Frick the bootmaker
(Thomas Petiet), and his lady love, the
glover Gabrielle (Leslie Delk). Petiet
gave Frick's lines some hilarious inter-
pretations. He and Delk cavorted
around the stage-much to the audien-
ce's amusement. Petiet also played
other minor roles with enthusiasm and
humor.
Musical Director Donn McIntosh did
all he could to keep the orchestra and
singers together. The singers sang with
more certainty and clarity than the or-
chestra played, however. All of the

leads in the performance were strong
vocalists, though some were stronger
than others in acting ability.
The sets were realistic and
imaginative. At one point, however, a
dinner table descended from the "sky"
above. Perhaps it could have been
placed on stage in a less obvious
fashion. Lighting was good, although
there was not much variation.
For the few patrons of musical
theater who braved the snow Wed-
nesday evening, the performance was
enjoyable. The actors seemed to be
having a good time performing, no mat-
ter how many people were in the
audience.
The show is being performed
February 5th and 6th at the Michigan
Theater, and then it is going to Ferris
State College March 7th, and finally to
Tecumseh March 13th.

FINAL WINTER
DUTCH AUCTION C
.. . SUITSSPORT COATS.
REGULAR WEDNESDAY S THURSDAYS FRIDAY'S SATURDAYS REGUtAR WEDNESDAY S THURSDAYS FRIDAYS SATURDAYS
PRICE DUTCH TREAL DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT PRICE DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT
:125 105 X7'5 s'65 '45 '75 65 X23 / 45 1$35
'19 17 * 1 135 105 '115 405 $85 75
1225 =2- * 165 -145 -125 1 ' ' 95 $ 85
$255 2 * '180 '155 1155 *$1 *5 $115 $105
1275 $ '200 $175 $175 * * -130 '115
'295 1 7 *4 $ '220 '195 '200 s8 8 1155 '140
1325 30 75 1250 '225 '275 25 $215 '195;'

F
. r.

ff

wed.- 20% Off COATS
Thrs- 30 % Off JACKETSI
Fri.- 40% Off I
Sat.- 50% Off LEATHERS
nl. . SS.. . ROu.. e...... i..cM.. So p Co.
ALSWEATERS wed.- 20% Off
IZOD Thurs.- 30% Off.
DEANS Fri- 40% Off
PENDLETON st.- 50% Off
wed.- 20% Off CASUAL
Thurs.- 30% Off and
Fri.- 40% Off DRESS
SOt- 50% Off SLACKS

HIS LADY SHOP FOR WOMEN
Wednesday Thursday
200/ BLAZERS 30%
OFF SKIRTS OFF
FRIDAY SLACKS Saturday
40% DRESSES 50
OFF OFF

ww.- 20% off RT SHIRTS
Thur.- 30% Off "
Fri.- 40% Off Sewn, fancyI
Sat.- 0 *% Off and Solids
From His Lady Shop For Women
haw u wed.- 20% Off
BLOUSES Thur.- 30% Off I
SHIRTS Fri.- 40% Off r
SWEATERS Sat.- 50% Off

_M ~~E F a
APTARE OX WTRW O R
306-310 S. STATE ST. " ANN ARBOR;..

I

From His Lady Shop For Women
Wed.- 20 % Off I-flau A
Thur.- 30% Off COATS;
Fri.- 40% Off V
sti.- 50% Off JACKETS,

1

Sale Ends On Saturday, February 6th
All Sales Final
Open Thursday 8 Friday Nites'til8:30

AIDme.hn.~e 050,4f 0 nefrom nix 5511 O.a ..,rners-,k NMt
ai sseny and coa. 0ara ob .o11Ten
VISA MASTERCHARGE AMERICAN EXPR{SS
Park ree l Moy-,od. Si Carport We Val40te YOU, Tcet.

._

Daily Classifieds Bring Results

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS'
(Continued from Page 6)

.Available for house sitting April 1. Currently doing so
for professor on sabbatical leave. Please call 971-
6401. 28M0211
The Destruction of the Student Community in Ann
Arbor, by Robert Honigman. Available at Ulrich's.
The hidden U-M student nolicies. cM0417

STEREOS FOR SALE, KEF 101 AND Audio 10
speakers, B&L 1700 turntable, Audionics amd and
nre-amn 'MUaxl tanes .662-7366 . 59020

Wanted applications for Michigan Honey Queen
Pageant at MSU on march 23. Prizes $500 and trip to
Hawaii. Call 668-7968 or 731-8967. 6800206
NEEDED-2-3 piece Irish band for St. Patrick's Day
to play at Irish Pub in Novi Call 764-8979. .%00207
SUBLET
ROOM AVAILABLE in nice house. Close to campus.
Friendly housemates. Own bathroom with shower.
Washer and dryer. Rent $167/month plus gas. Call
anytime, ask for Kate. 668-8894. 1008 Church Street.
17U0210
LARGE, centrally-located Summer sublet for one or
two. Probable fall option. 996-3804. 52U0206
of a 2 bedrm. apartment from May 1-August 31.
Very close to campus, furnished, parking, laundry,
air conditioning, good price. Call Ann. 995-5916.
31U0205

Tired of the dorms? I'm looking for 4-5 people to
share a house on campus for the 82-83 school year.
WRITE TO MIKE, Box 4090, 541 Thompson, Ann Ar-
bor to arrange a meeting. 65Y0205
Hallo, Lynn Salo! Come to the Daily and pick up your
two free tickets to the State Theater. dU0205
LOOKING FOR 3 people to share great house $190
plus utilities, own bedroom, S. Campus, Call 996-8310
or 761-8542. 85YO207
Surprise George Gamota of Hill Street-you are now
the proud owner of two free tickets to the State
Theater. Come to the Daily and get them. dY0205

Housing Division
BLACK HISTORY CELEBRATION - 1982
Theme: "BLACK ROLE MODELS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW"

GIANT FLEA MARKET
Every weekend 150 dealers. Household items, fur-
niture, antiques, bargains, plants. 6 pm-10 pm Fri.,
10 am-6 pin Sat. & Sun. 214 E. Michigan at Park.
Downtown Ypsilanti. cW1212

Neue Liebeslieder Walzes
Brahms
the University of Michigan
Chamber Choir
1981 GRAMMY AWARD NOMINEE

1/31
2/1
2/1-
2/S
2/2
2/3

BLACK HISTORY MONTH KICKOFF
'A Meeting of Minds..."
A panel discussion on tmnority isues
7:30 p.m. Markley Hall, North Pit
OPEN HOUSE
Nikki Giovanni Lounge
Mosher Jordan 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MISS JANE PITMAN
mTovie starring Cicely Tyson
Oxford, Seeley I ounge 8:00 p.m.
"ROOTS: The Saga or an Anmerican Family Series"
film based on best seller by Alex Haiy
South Quad, West Lounge 7:30 p m.
C.U.LS. -Black Film Festival
7:00 p.m. Trotter House
"Carmen Jones". Dorothy Dandrige and Harry BelafonTe
"ROOTS: The Saga of an American Family Series"
film based on the best seller by Alex Haley
South Quad, West Lounige 7:30 p.m.

"ROOTS: ,The Saga of an American Family Series",
film~ based on the b~est seller by Alex Haley
South Quad. West Lounge 7:30 p.m.
"RAISIN IN THE SUN"' movie
Markley Hall. Markley Cafeteria
9:00 and 11:30 p.m.

C.U.LS. - Black Film Festival
7:00 p m. Auditorium,. Angel? Hall
"Emperor Jones" Paul Ro so n
8th Annual Minorty Arts & Cultural Festival '82
Openitig Cernmonies 7:00 p.m. Room 126
Speaker: Lary Simmons, Detroit Urban League
"Miinorities and the 80's"
Jaz' Concert 8:30 p.T. RC Auditorium
Bands:
The Rayse Biggs Quintet
Rendezvs si
ast Quad Residence Hall
"Stir Crazy" starring Richard Pryor
7:30 p.m. Bursley Hall, Minority Cultural Lounge
"ROOTS: The Saga of an American Family Series".
fim based on the best seller by Alex Haley
South Quad, West Lounge 7:30 p.m.
(.L.S. -Black Film FestiJal
7:00 p.m. Auditorium. An~gell Hall
"The Duchmian",. Al Freeman, Jr. and
"Black Filmi Prodciion and Black Images in Film",

2/7
2/8
2/9
2/to

'81h Annual Minority Arts & Cultural Festival '82"
Art Exhibit 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Room 126t
Fraternty and Sorority Exhibit 1:00 -3:00p.m. Room 124
Poetry Reading 3:00 p.m. Benzinger Library Fashion/'
Performing Arts Show 8:00 - 11:00 p.m. RC Auditorium
Benefit Dance 11:00p.m. .-until South Cafeteria
East Quad Residence Hall
Soul Food Dinner and Family Feud
5:00 p.m. Bursley Hall, Cafeteria
"Health Problems for Btark Arnseicana"
HenryLewis. Naturopath Lecture and discussion
6:30 p.m. Alice Lloyd, Red Carpet Lounge
Great B~lack Leaders Pass, Present, and Future
Professor Thomas Holt, C.A.A.S.. lecture and discussion.
8:00 p.m. Strauss Library, West Quad
Soul Food Dinner 4:30 - 6:15 Dining Room and
"Bichinis Bia Congo" (Dances from the Congo)
6:30 - 8:00 p.m. Stockwell Hall Blue Lounge
Mural Presentation
Joni Onyc Lockard.
8:00 p.m. Afro Lounge. South Quad
C.A.A.S. Colloquim
'Aspects of Caribbean Immigration to the United States"
Dr. Roy Bryce-LaPorTe, Researeb Inslittie on Immigration
and Ethnic Studies The Smithsonian Istitute, Washington
Room 246 Lorch Hall 12:00 p.m.

2/1l6
2/17?

"Blak History: Lost, Stolen or Strayed," movie starring
Bill Cosby, Oxford, Seeley Lounge 8:00 p.m.
"Black Cultural Display"
7:00 p.m. Angela Davis Lounge, Markley Hall
C.A.A.S- 9:00 - 10:30 p.m.
Beverly Draper, Channel 2 News Room 102, Lorch Hall
*Soul Food Dinner 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Alice Lloyd, Dining Room.
"U.S. Youth and the Struggle for Southern Africa"
James Steel, lecture and discussion
8:00 p.m. Strauss Library, West Quad
"The Political and Legal Dimension of Recent Cuban and
Haitian Immigration to the U.S.A."
Professor Pauline Tert'elonge.
Political Science and C.A.A.S.
Room 246, Lorch Hall -
"Using the Struggle for Southern Africa"
James Steel, lecture
Schorling Auditorium, School of Education Building
(Y.W.L.L. and C.A.A.S. sponsors)
C.A.A.S. 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Ben Frazier, Channel 4 News, Detroit
Room 102,. Lorch Hall

2/S

C.U.L.S. - Black Film Festival
7:00 p.m. Trotter House
"Stormy Weather", Lena Horne
C.A.A.S. oloquim
"An overview of the American Immtigration Laws."
Professor T. Alexander Aleinikof , Law School. The

2/to

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_, .. , _ r..... I University CAsod Choir

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