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February 04, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-04

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v

ARTS,
Thursday, February 4, 1982-

U -M Department of Theatre and Drama Presents
Frederick KnottI's

MnAl m

RECUMMCCOM,

Page 5

The Michigan Daily

r

Feb. 3-6, 8:00 pm

Mendelssohn Theatre

A selection of campus film highlights

Guess Who's Coming
to Dinner
(Stanley Kramer, 1967)
This, the last time Katherine Hep-
burn and Spencer 'Tracy worked
together, is one of their best-and
most important--movies. The .two
play husband and wife (again). This
time their daughter brings to dinner
her intended husband, Sidney
Poitier. Get it? A typically enchan-
ting, film in which Tracy and Hep-
burn prove that they are top-notch
actors. (F'riday, Feb. 5; Nat. Sci., 7:00)

Superman II
(Richard Lester, 1981)
The fim of the week to miss. Where
Superman gave us a legendary
beginning, and a child's eye view of
heroism, Superman II gives us car-
dboard characters in a plastic plot.
It is true that this film is much closer
to the comic book Superman, but
that only means that it is that much
worse. Still, you've got Margot Kid-
der, Christopher Reeve, and Gene
Hackman acting with more wit,
than you would thing possible. (Feb.
5,6; MLB 4,7:00, 9:15).
Alien
(Ridley Scott, 1979)
A visual tour de force. The film
combines taut direction and impec-
cable production values to provide
two hours of extraordinary fantasy.
The plot is the oldest one in the book;
a nasty monster scares some people.
The movie can not be dismissed on
those grounds, however, because it
is constructed so well. One of the
best gothic horror films, and it's set in
outer space to boot. (Feb. 5; Lorch
Hall, 7:00, 9:15).
Rude Boy
(J. Hazam, D. Mingay,1980)
An incoherent attempt to depict the
life of a 20-year-old youth living
amidst the subculturesyofcontem-
porary England. It's also futile in its

attempt to accurately portray the
class 3nd racial tensions of the coun-
try. But the live footage of the Clash
makes the film a must. (Feb. 5; Aud.
A, 7: 00,10: 00).
The Shining
(Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
Not the perfect adaptation of the
Stephen King novel many would
have liked, this film ponders along
for the first hour before developing
into a fairly scary climax. Jack
Nicholson stars as the ex-alcoholic
winter caretaker of the remote, and
empty, Overlook Hotel. Shelly
Duvall is never convincing as the
mother, a defect which seriously
lessens' the film's impact. (Satur-
day, Feb. 6; MLB 4, 7:00f,9:00).
Casablanca
(Michael Curtiz, 1942)
The film that defined the Hollywood
tradition of the romantic action
movie- is also a tremendous exam-
ple of casting in depth. There isn't
one false performance in this
cinematic marvel. Humphrey
Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude
Rains, and the inimitable Dooley
Wilson are the patrons of the legen-
dary Rick's. Only a doctor's note
will excuse you from seeing this
film. (Feb. 6; Lorch Hall, 7:00,
10:40).
Kiss Me Deadly :
(Robert Aldrich, 1955)
A tpically fast, violent, Aldrich flick
that was the culmination of the film
noir genre. Ralph Meeker is the
private eye out to solve all the
mysteries and find all' the treasure.
This fijm influenced many of the
French new wave directors because
of it's perfect combination of style
and substance. (Sunday, Feb. 7,
Aud. A, 8:45).
Stolen Kisses
(Francois Truffaut, 1968)
Antoine Doinel, the fictional dop-
pleganger of Truffaut, scores again
in the third installment of his life.
Following The 400 Blows and Love
At Twenty, we watch Doinel ramble
through a series of odd-jobs; ending
up engaged to his sweetheart. (Wed-
nesday, Feb. 10; Michigan Theater,
4:00, 7:00, 8:45).
-compiled by Richard Campbell

By Sarah Bassett
D ISABLED PEOPLE are usually
thought of as "special."
They have physical handicaps; their
bodies are not ordinary. So (it is com-
monly assumed), their lives must be as
unusual as they seem to be.
But Alan , J. Brightman, a
photographer from Cambridge, Mass.,
disagrees. His insightful exhibit called
"Ordinary Moments"-at the Schol of
Education through February 6-both
states and challenges prevailing con-
ceptions.
The 34-year-old photographer was
also project director and associate
producer of the award-winnifig
television series "Feeling Free," a PBS
broadcast dealing with the subject of
disabled children. He has co-authored
several books on the subject, and holds
a Ph.D. in education from Harvard
University.
The 45 color photographs are of
people playing sports, sailing boats,
kissing, working, and sharing jokes
together. The people, however, have ar-
tificial limbs or are in wheelchairs.
They all are handicapped.
Brightmen has photographed casual
situations that confront us with people
who are not perceived as ordinary, but
who are nevertheless doing common-
place things. The lives of the disabled,
we find, are filled with the same or-
dinary moments we all experien-
ce-"pointless punctuations in any
day," he calls them. +
Most of the people were
photographed in Boston, where
Brightman heads a nonprofit firm
devoted to improving the quality of life
for disabledmindividuals. The pictures
were originally taken in celebration of
1981, the International Year of Disabled
Persons.
The images force us to review some
common misconceptions about the
disabled.
These men and women seem
capable; the photographs show us that
they experience universal emotions.
They are seen at home, in parks and at
their jobs while laughing, pondering,
concentrating, frowning, and playing.
They do not differ greatly from non-
disabled people in the scope of their
lives or the activities they choose. And
they are neither pitiful nor awesome as
individuals. Instead, they remind us of
ourselves.
Dear Merchant.
Did you know
that Daily
readers spend-
over $125
million on
items you
sell?____
GET YOUR AD!
CALL
764-0554

"So many public images of disability
are designed to prove something or
teach something about what it's like to
be different," Brightman says in his in-
troduction to the exhibit. ". . . (these
photographs) are like pictures one
might take of a friend, just a person
being who he or she likes to be."
Qutoes from the people are spiced
throughot the exhibit to help project
their personalities. One reads: "It's
hard to dance in a wheelchair. Not im-
possible, just hard. . . and with the_
right person, wonderful."
Each quote is a refreshing,
stereotype-shattering glimpse' into
these individuals.
The quotes also add dimension to the
photographs: we not only see the
people, we also learn of their thoughts
and feelings. As a result, the men and
women reach out beyond appearances
and we see them as individuals.
However,-they usually perceive the
non-disabled more incisively and ac-
curately than vice versa. There are
some powerful comments quoted in the
show on this subject.
"'People should only see how they
look when they're looking at me," reads
one. The observation is a reminder of
how ? the handicapped expect to be
stared at, whispered about, and treated
awkwardly by others-daily.
Frequently, Brightman explained,
we divide up the world into "us" and
"them," allowing "us" more freedom.
"We change our roles to suit the oc-
casion. They remain' "the disabled"
everywhere, all the time," he said.
Physical disabilities do not limit
them, Brightman concluded. Rather,
they are not- accepted as "ordinary"
people: "that's the handicap that mat-
ters."
Perceptions and attitudes, then, are
the real subject matter of "Ordinary
Moments," attitudes belonging to
disabled and non-disabled people
alike-the real handicaps.
The exhibit is one step toward inser-
ting truth where myths used to be. It
remains a moving, disturbing, warm
and unique experience.

'Ordinary Moments'
shatters stereotypes.

"A gutsy, emotional movie about what it
really takes to be a hero. One of the
finest films of this or any year."
-Rona Barrett, Today Show, NBC-TV
"A masterpiece. The film's overwhelming
impact will touch and affect you."
-Rex Reed, Syndicated Columnist
STARTS1
TOMORROW
CALL FOR
SHOW TIMES:
CHARIOTS OF FiR
,AtI it[D SARS. PRES I'N A" [NUMA PRODUCT IN
PG PARENTALGUIDANCE SUGGESTED St-J S BENCRO5- IA! CARDS( " NG ELAVLR5
s2M!ItER ' OSEStCEOCE -"° CII RYL CAMPBELL " ALICE.KKIGF -"Guest Stars LINDSAY ANDER50N
C. C i~~t~i!'lNNS CiiIUS'iOrIiR - !'IOELDAVENPIORT -BRItAD DAVIS '
-- u~cro*.*.' PTER f[(jAC" S. 'OH JN'!(jtIL) -AN! HOLM -PATRICK MAGEE
A LADD COMPANY AND WARNER BROS. RELEASE K4'. )' Y LNC 11!!WLI.L.A!'1IMuic nyVA!'!tLIS
.wAn"E""<QSOA~WAPRnFwrCo w*.i scAonraUP*v -1 vv~ur I,,xjiv Cr fDO DI FAYED) Pod1,n ii b\ DAVID) FLI'T'TNAM
" "1 'I .' . S S
**
* z
TIME BANDITS TONIGHT AT
TONIGHT AT 6:45-9:30
715.9:20
..they stole history!.' AMES CAGNEY
JOHN CLEES GOOD TIMES
SEAN CONNERY DAD TIMES
.j=ry NDITS
AVCO EMBASSY P UT
P::CT'rES PICTURE

Tickets at PTP Mich. League, 764-0450
n . AILLG375 N. MAPLE
in MAPLE VILLAGE SHPG CT7
BA RGAIN SHOWS $2.59 before & P.M. Mon.-Fri.; before 3 P.M. Sat.-Sun.
V THE STREET11
U ' ~STAYING ALIVE .500
1130-320 515 7 00
. at a y. 7:15-9:15 0I
1:30 D$JDl 1:30
1 5151 ninn LIVE! 5:30
6INmr&NC77 9InQ730
i 5n concert 9:30

Cr~ehestra dazzles

* By Robert Maki
USTAV MEIER led the University
IjSymphony Orchestra Tuesday in
excellent performances of the "Over-
ture to Fidelio" by Beethoven, the
"Concerto" by Frank{Martin, and the
"Symphony number one in G Minor" by
Tchaikovsky.
Right from the beginning of the
"Overture" the orchestra proved itself
a fine ensemble. The playing of the first
four measures, marked forte, filled the
hall with lush sound. One was almost
taken aback with the fullness of their
sound, especially the strings. It was
quite exciting to hear Such a large
group, professional in size, play so well.
One short cello solo was a little out of
tune, but such tests as double bass piz-
zacato were letter-perfect. The winds
were a trifle unsure at first, but settled
down quickly and, along with the'
strings and solid timpani playing, made
marvelous music.
The "Concerto" for seven wind in-
struments, four percussionists, and
strings by Frank Martin allowed a
display of clearly talented playing. The
oboist, having a solo at the beginning,,
layed brilliantly. Even at the end of the
first movement, 'which calls for long

notes at the extreme high register of the
instrument, was solid. The trumpet
playing as well, as evidenced by the
muted solo toward the beginning of the
second movement, was first rate.. Some
of the string playing, such as at the end
of the second movement when the
double basses couldn't be heard and
this sounded as though the movement
ended differently than originally
scored, and not quite together staccatos
from the violins, was weak. But the soli
for all strings (except basses) in the
second movement was well done, and
the playing of the strings was generally,
quite good.
After a rather long intermission the
orchestra finished the concert with the
"Symphony Number One" by Tchaikov-
sky. Why this piece was played is
anybody's guess. One hopes that Meier
did not have the sole vote in electing
this wretched piece to the program.
Perhaps the orchestra protested in its
own way by letting its playing slip a lit-
tle. The intonation of the violins in high
spots in the first movement was off, and
an exposed double bass part in the
second movement was out of tune, and
the violas, while playing a soli in the
second movement well,.botched one in
the fourth. However, the entire or-
chestra played with the bombast
needed for this piece, thereby giving is
what the compoger intended.

":
0
I
,
"
"
1

INDIVIDlAL THEATRES
of A o at '19 761-97.0
'The Miracle of this movie is,t
it sends us home in a statet
dering on elation."
Cosmopolitan
RICHARD
Whose
life isit
a way0
THURS, FRI-7:00, 9:15

o
that
bor-
(og
(R)

"
"
"
"

O '" With This Entire
1 0 Ad. One Ticket $1.50
Mon, Wed, Thurs .Eve.
Good Thrv2/4/82 (Except "REDS")

I

I

I-

I

" GOLDEN GLOBE WINNER I

W

N=

WARREN BEATTY
DIANE KEATON
RES
0 THURS, FRI-8:30

A4 great torches~tnar of wicyh Buailria ,ran he nrn,,

-11up- -RIP- -,qN
.dommm- . mmm.-

- Pris
SOFIA
PHILHARMONIC
Vladigerov: Bulgarian Rhapsody "Vardar"
Tchaikovskyi Violin Concerto in D major
Mincho Minchev, violinist
Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 in G major
Thursday, Feb. 4 at 8:30
Hill Auditorium

- I

/

- U'

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