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February 04, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-04

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* ~

4

Page 2-Thursday, February 4, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Polish irings add to turmoil

WARSAW, Poland (AP)-About 700
officials-six of them provincial gover-,
nors-have been fired since the Dec. 13
martial law crackdown, the official
polish news agency PAP said yester-
day.
At the same time, the government
newspaper Republic blamed student
activists for last Saturday's riots in
Gdnnsk and said they wanted "a
change in the political system in
. biand."
A Radio Warsaw broadcast
monitored in Vienna said an army
general had been named governor of
Gdansk province following the riots, the
'mbst serious violent challenlge to the
communist government in more than a
'month.
PAP SAID the Polish officials fired
included six provincial governors, 14
deputy governors and 160 mayors or
lgcal leaders.

The agency did not elaborate, but
many officials have been replaced by
military officers under the gover-
nment's campaign to purge and
blacklist people who are suspected of
disloyalty to the Communist Party and
the state.
Meanwhile, officials of the banned
Independent Students' Association in
Warsaw circulated a clandestine "ap-
peal to students of the world" to show
support for Polish students. The
association was declared subversive af-
ter martial law was imposed. .
"THE TRUTH IS, one can disband an
organization, but one cannot destroy
the spirit of, solidarity," the
association's appeal stated. We know
we were and are right."
Government spokesman Jerzy Urban
told a news. conference for foreign
reporters that 3,000 young Gdansk
rioters shouted anti-police slogans and

tried to storm government buildings.
He said police used water hoses and
tear gas against the rioters.
Martial law authorities have since
tightened security in Gdansk, the nor-
thern seaport where the now-suspended
Solidarity independent labor union was
formed. Government press center of-
ficials said Western reporters will be
allowed to visit Gdansk next Tuesday.
AGRICULTURE MINISTER Jerzy
Wojtecki told reporters that Poland
needed 3 million more tons of grain this
year because U.S. economic sanctions
cut off corn shipments. He said the
cutoff would kill the chicken market by
April.
In Moscow, long lines at meat coun-
ters and shortages of eggs, butter and
other staples this winter show that
Soviet consumers are shouldering the
burden of another poor harvest and
Kremlin aid to Poland.

The Kremlin has not officially
acknowledged reports it has sent
thousands of tons of food to Poland to
support that nation's communist
government, which imposed martial
law Dec. 13 after 16 months of strikes
and political unrest.
WESTERN OBSERVERS speculate
the Soviet leadership has been afraid to
admit it is sending food to Poland while
its own citizens scrounge and stand in
lines to buy groceries.
The Kremlin has said it is the main-
stay of "fraternal aid" to Poland since
the imposition of martial law. At the
same time, the Soviets have accused
the United States of trying to starve the
Poles by withholding food credits and
suspending fishing rights.
Archbishop Jozef Glemip, the leader
of Poland's powerful Roman Catholic
Church, is due to arrive at the Vatican
today to meet with Pope John Paul II on
church strategy.-

S... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .*. . .*~.* . . .*.*.m .*.*.*.IN

4
,Health
concerns
prompt
asbestos
testing

(Continued fromPage 1) /
taken no safety .precautions when removing ceiling
tiles at the building's south end. Dust from the tile
make the renovation area look like a "snowstorm"
one day, Pilkinton said.
IN 1955, researchers established a definite link
between asbestos and asbestosis, a disease in which
the lungs are irritated by inhalation of asbestos dust.
After exposure, the disease takes about 20 years to
surface and is almost always fatal, according to
health experts.
Don Weiss, a Los Angeles-based attorney who
specializes in harmful substance litigation, last week
said the likelihood is more than 80 percent that
asbestos was used in the construction of both the
Frieze Building and the Union. Prior to the 1970s,-it
was a very popular building material, he explained.

,; :J}i }y:: : K ' tiitiiY ....: v:u. .v ...:: .. . v. ..... :....... .. . '
_.. .y:>.: a::.t::..' a : ." ":.t. . ..." " W}.:u . ,ayJ, .44.W."': ::y a44.,.":.::"::::".;:" :::o:.'"r
.:...:.i......'. ...............................................................................................................

MARTY'S ... GOES DUTCH TREAT WITH

DUTCH

AUCT-

THEIR SEVENTH ANNUA
FINAL
CLEA
Iow Thr

S

UIT

S

SPORT COATS.

it

REGULAR
PRICE
$125
;195
$225
X255
$275
'295
$325

WEDNESDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
'105
7
'0
7
300

THURSDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
: 85
$155
$185
$205
$225
$245
$275

FPIDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
'65
'135
$165
$180
$200
'220
$250

SATURDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
'45
$105
'145
$155 .
$175
$195
$225

REGULAR
PRICE.
'75
'115
'125
'155
$175
$200
$275

WEDNESDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
6
S'0
$6
'6
8
255

THURSDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
* 55
' 95
:105
$125
'145.*
$170
$235
wed.- 2
Thurs.- 3
Fri.- 4
Sat.- 5

FRIDAY'S
DUTCH TRE
' 45
' 85
= 95
$115
$130
1155
'215

Recent literature describes asbestos as a fluffy,
fibrous material produced from rock and well known
for its ability to resist heat and acids.
OF THE ALMOST 3000 asbestos products manufac-
tured today, approximately two-thirds are used for
construction.
During the construction boom of the 1930s and
1940s, asbestos was commonly used in building
'because of its reputation as an inexpensive, sturdy,
fire-resistant heat insulator.
Asbestos exposure has also been linked to three
other diseases: cancer of the respiratory system,
"asbestos corns" (small skin lesions resembling
blisters), and mesothelioma-a rare cancer of the
chest and abdominal lining which is usually fatal
within one year of the first symptoms.
e
L .Officials
.WI NTE R
RANCE crack down
u Saturday
on drunk
S SATURDAY'S
ETDUTCH TREAT
ATH driving-
S 85 I (Continued from Page1)
*105 cidents, back to the bars or homes
'115 where they became intoxicated. Minick
'140 said that in some cases the county can
*195 prosecute those barowners responsible
for sending drunk drivers on the road.
.SPORTSHIRTS THE COUNTY'S Alcohol Enfor-
Plain ft Fancy cement Program, which is funded by-
f Knits, CutIt the National Highway Safety Com-,
* Sewn, Fancy mission, seems to be a part of a larger;
f and Solids nationalawareness of the problems
related to drunk drivers, according to.
p For Women John Moulden, a spokesman for the
20% off National Highway Safety Ad-
30 % Off ministration in Washington. "There's
40 % Off no doubt about it," Moulden said. "The
50 % Off public has become much more aware of
the drunk driver."
p For Women Much of the public interest has been
ff s 'erps spurred by government agencies, such
Ff C'O"TSas the Highway Safety Administration,
Ff COATS and by grass-roots citizen groups, such
ff JACKETS as Mothers Against Drunk Driving
(MADD) and Students Against Drunk.
r fall and winter stock. Not Driving (SADD).
ems. .These citizen groups, organized into
MERICAN EXPRESS local chapters, lobby with legislative
We Validate Your Ticket officials in an effort to win passage of
tougher laws against drunk drivers.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Auto sales hit 21-year low
DETROIT- Domestic automakers yesterday reported car sales for
January as the worst rate in 21 years.
Total domestic sales of 368,138 were down 18.5 percent on a daily rate basis
from the 469,832 cars sold in 1981 for the worst selling rate since 1961.
Ford Motor Co. posted the best 10-day sales report, with sales of 88,806 off
5.7 percent from 1981.
Also, Ford said yesterday it wants to freeze cost-of-living benefits and
eliminate paid time off in return for promises of greater job securityfor
veteran members of the United Auto Workers unign.
Witnesses give damaging
testimony in Atlanta trial
ATLANTA- Witnesses testified yesterday that they saw Wayne Williams
in the company of the two youths he.is accused of murdering shortly before
they died, and that Williams was holding hands with one of them.
Robert Henry, a surprise witness who came to the prosecution's attention
only two days ago, said he saw Williams holding hands with 27-year-old
Nathaniel Cater on the evening of May 21. That was just hours before
Williams was stopped near a Chattahoochee River bridge where prosecutors
contend Cater's body was dumped. The body was pulled from the river May
24.
A second witness, A.B. Dean, said he saw Williams with 21-yer-old Jim-
my Ray Payne on April 22, 1981, the day Payne disappeared. Dean, an
elderly resident of suburban Douglas County, said he saw Williams again the
next day near the Chattahoochee.
Brezhnev assails U.S. policy
MOSCOW- President Leonid Brezhnev yesterday denounced the Reagan
administration policy linking resumption of arms talks with Soviet actions in
other areas-notably Poland and Afghanistan.
But the Soviet leader also emphasized a need for the two superpowers to
negotiate a reduction in nuclear arms at a time of world conflict he
described as the most serious in 35 years.
U.S. and Soviet diplomats have reported little progress in talks that
opened in November aimed at limiting European deployment of medium-
range nuclear missiles, including Soviet SS series weapons.
Dozier arrives in Washington
WASHINGTON- Brig. Gen. James Dozier returned home yesterday after
42 days as a captive of terrorists, his arrival made more dramatic by a once-
aborted landing of the plane bringing him back.
With Vice President George Bush and other dignitaries looking on, the Air
Force C-141 Starlifter broke out of clouds at 2 3 feet, banked right, then left,
and roared aloft again. On his second approach a few minutes later, the pilo
made a perfect landing.
An Air Force spokesman said the plane-was never in danger and Dozier
made no mention of the incident in his brief remarks.
"It's doggone good to be home," Dozier said.
Meanwhile yesterday, the House of Representatives passed a resolution
praising the Italian government and its anti-terrorist police for the rescue of
Dozier.
\Lawyers argue admission
of Hinckley trial evidence
WASHINGTON- A government lawyer argued. yesterday that
prosecutors should be able to use statements: by accused presidential
assailant John Hinckley to shovihis clear stateof mindiii['the hours following
his arrest.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Farrell told a special appeals court panel
that the material would be used at Hinckley's trial to show his "lucidity,
rationality ... ability to commit the crime for which he is charged."
Vol. XCII, No. 103
Thursday, February 4, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sundy mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters) ; $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor'- Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan aily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552. 76-OAILY. Sports desk. 764.0562: Circulation. 764.0558: Classified Advertising.
764-0557; Display advertising. 764.0554: Billing. 764.0550.

a

I'

wed.- _20% off COATS,
Thur.- 30 % Off JACKETS'
40 % off A THE#
5tt 50 O ff ET "
Entire Stock of Outerwear Including Top Coats

1I

ALL SWEATERS wed.- 20% off
DEANS Thurs. 30 % Off
BYFORD Fri.- 40 % Off
PENDLETON Sat.- 50% Off

IS LADY SHOP FOR WOMEN
Wednsday ,Thursday
2 ' a BLAZERS Q
'QSKIRTS30,
OFF OFF
FRIDAY SLACKS Saturday
DRESSES 5 o
OFF OFF
FoThe Man
APPAREL FOR WOMEN -

{

20%
30%
40%

of
Ofd
Oft
Ofl

{,

From His
SpeialGroups
o Wntux
BLOUSES
SHIRTS
SWEATERS

Lady Shoj
Wed.-
Thurs.-
Fri.-
Sat.-

wed.- 20 %
Thurs- 30%
Fri.- 50 %4
sit.- 50 %

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and
DRESS
SLACKS

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Wed- 20% Of
Thurs, 30 % Of
Fri.- 40 % Of
St.- 50 % Of
All merchandise on sale is from our
all sizes and colors available in oilits
VISA, MASTERCHARGE, A

.l

Sale Ends On Saturday, February 6th
All Sales Final
Open Thursday f Friday Nites 'til8:30

.306-310 S. STATE ST. 0 ANN ARBOR Park Freel n Maynard St. Carport;V

1

I

I:,.

JUST
DOCTO

WHAT THE
R ORDERED

4
4

Editor-in-Chief ...................... DAVID MEYER.
Managing Editor .................PAMELA KRAMER
Executive Editor.............CHARLES HOMSON
Student Affairs Editor ............ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor... ..... ........... MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors ..........ANDREW CHAPMAN
JULIE HINDS
Arts Editors ................... RICHARD CAMPBELL.
MICHAEL HUGET
Sports Editor ................... MARK MHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors ............ GREG DeGULIS.
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer ............. PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
ARTISTS: Norm Christiansen, Robert Lence, Jonathan
Stewart, Richard Walk.
LIBRARIANS: Bonnie Hawkins, Gory Schmidt.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Perry Clark,
David Crawford, Lisa Crurprine. Pam Fickinger, Lou
Fintor, Joyce Frieden, Steve Hook, Kathlyn Hoover,
Harlon Kohn, Mindy Layne, Mike McIntyre, Anne
Mytych, Nancy Newman, Don Oberrotmann, Stacy
Powell, Janet Roe, Soon Ross, Lauren Rousseau,
Susan Sharon, David Spok, Lisa Spector, Fannie
Weinstein. Barry Witt.
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Dan Aronoff, Linda Balkin,
Kent Redding, Nathaniel Worshay.

ARTS STAFF: Tonia Bianich, Jane Carl, James Clinton,
I4ork Dighton, Adam Knee, Gail Negbour, Carol
Ponemon, Ben Ticho.
SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Jesse Brkin, Tom
Bentley, Randy Berger, Mark Borowski, Joe Choppelle,
Laura Clark, Martha Croll, Jim Dworman, Karen Flach,
Larry Freed, Matt Henehan, Chuck Jaffe, John Kerr,
Doug Levy, Jim Lombard, Larry Mishkin, Don Newman,
Andrew Oakes, Ron Pollock, Jeff Quicksilver, Sarah
Sherber, Kenny Shore, James Thompson, Josie
VonVoigtlander. Kent WoHey. Karl Wheatley; Chris
Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager................JOSEPH BRODA
Sales Manager ............. .. KATHRYN HENDRICK
Operations Manager ............. SUSAN RABUSHKA
Display Manager................... ANN SACHAR
Classifieds Manager............. MICHAEL SELTZER
Finance Manager ..........:...... SAM SLAUGHTER
Assistant Display Manager .........,.PAMELA GOULD
Nationals Manager ................. LINDSAY BRAY
Circulation Manager ...'............... KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator ............ E. ANDREW PETERSEN
SALES.REPRESENTATIVES: Wendy Fox, Mark Freeman.
Nancy Joslin, Beth Kovinsky, Coryn Notiss, Felice
Oper, Jodi Pollock, Tim Pryor, Jeff Voigt.
BUSINESS STAFF: Hope Barron, Fran Bell, Molly
Benson, gecki Choitiner, Lauro Farrell, Sandy Frcka,
Meg Gibson, Pam Gillery, Marci Gittlemon, Jamie
Goldsmith, Jan Goldstein, Karen Johnson, Ada
Kusnetz,.Rob Perelman, Gito Pillai, Dan Quandt. Pete
Rowley, Leah Stanley, Hildy Stone, Tracy Summerwill,
Joseph Trulik, Mary Ellen Weinberg.

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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S ?22 W T F S S M T W T' F S S M T W T F S S w T. W T F S
12 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
T 101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10'1112 1314 6 8 9 101112
13 11576 718 19 111 13 14 15 16 17 151 17 18 19 2021
222324 25 26 18 20 21 22 23 24 22 24 25 2--?6
27 30 25 6?7 28 29 30 319

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