100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 29, 1982 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page 2-Frifday, January 29, 1982-Th e Michigan Daily
Future jobs in,
Nat. Resources
may be scarce

ANGELL HALL
Built in 1924, after the University President James B. Angell,
Angell Hall has traditionally been one of the first buildings
used for university classes. The Michigan Daily has also
been a tradition since 1890.
Another tAichigan tradition you can enjoy
Subscribe early for fali-winter term
m mm IEEE ininss mmm ome
SU BSCRIPTION RATES:
$12 Sept. thru April (2 Semesters)
$13 By mail outside Ann Arbor
$6.50 Per Semester
$7.00 By mail outside Ann Arbork
SEND TO: THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Stu dent Publications Building
420 Maynard Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
Phone: 764-0558
(ALL OUT OF TOWN
SUBSCRIPTIONS
MUST BE PREPAID)
Name:
Address:
Phone: Student ID No.:

By ABBY TABB
As federal budget cuts continue to
shrink environmental agencies, career
opportunities for natural resources
students look bleak for the next decade,
according to several professors in the
University's School of Natural Resour-
ces.
The Department of Agriculture, the
Forest Service, the National Park Ser-
vice, and the Department, of Natural
Resources all will feel the crunch of
President Reagan's fiscal policies.
The decline in federal funds "is going
to reduce the opportunity for jobs,"
said Prof. John Bassett of the School of
Natural Resources. The number of
government jobs available began to
decrease four years ago, Bassett said,
and since then the department has ad-
vised students to seek employment in
the private sector.
Land management and energy firms
such as Conoco hire resource policy and
management students to interpret
federal controls. Demand for such per-
sonnel, however, depends on how en-
vironment-conscious each firm is.
Spokesmen for Weyerhauser, a
multinational corporation involved in
forestry and lumber manufacture, said
they see a bright future 'for the in-
dustry. "Those parts of Reagan's
programs that are designed to increase
savings will put this part' of the industry
in better health than without the cuts,"
said Tom Ambrose, director of infor-
mation at Weyerhauser's Seattle office.
There has been no cut in the number
of jobs at Weyerhauser, according to

Ambrose. He said there has actually
been a drop in applications, but predic-
ts a rise when the economy improves.
In the Ann Arbor area, however, em-
ployment prospects for natural resour-
ces graduates are not so bright. The
Great Lakes Basin Commission, a
federally funded agency which will
close this year, in the past hired many
University graduates.
Other than the blow of losing the
Basin Commission, the University's
School of Natural Resources hasn't yet
felt any effects from Reagan's policy,
according to Bassett. Enrollment has
declined steadily since the peak of in-
terest in natural resources-from 1969
to 1973-but there has been no sudden
drop since the new cuts.
Most undergraduates in the school
said they are optimistic. "Jobs will be
there, .hopefully, when Reagan gets
out," said junior Jennifer Simon.
But graduate students currently
looking for jobs are discouraged by
immediate prospects. "I'm scared,"
said Barb Kieber. "But I hope that the
situation will improve."
Barb Nelson, a graduate who has
worked seasonally with the park ser-
vice, said full-time employment is
nearly impossible to find.
Both Marquis and Basset recommen-
ded additional degrees in business or
law. An MBA is "the clearest route to
the private sector (in forestry),"
Basset said.
The University's graduate program
in forestry is currently in the process of
See JOBS, Page 7

IN BRIEF
Compilied from Associated Press and
United Press International reportsk
Colombian hijackers flee
after releasing hostages
CALI, Colombia- Seven heavily armed leftist guerrillas let 74 hostages
leave a hijacked Colombian airliner yesterday, then boarded a small private
jet and took off for an unknown destination.
Some of the hostages were put into the executive-type jet, according to
Colombian army and civil aviation officials, and it was possible some
remained aboard when the getaway plane took off from Cali airport.
An army source said earlier the guerrillas agreed to free all their captives
except two in return for the small jet and safe passage out of the country.
, The army also gave the guerrillas flight maps for all of Central America
and the Caribbean, and there was speculation the hijackers might head to
Cuba,about 800 miles northeast of Cali, or about 90 minutes flying time.
U.S. official may join Haig
in Middle East peace talks
CAIRO, Egypt- Secretary of State Alexander Haig, plunging deeply into
the intricate details of the Middle East peace process, brought on stage
yesterday a U.S. official touted as an "expediter" for the snarled Palestinian
autonomy talks between Egypt and Israel.
In back-to-back trips to Jerusalem and Cairo-his second Middle East
shuttle in two weeks-Haig planted some specific ideas he hopes will narrow
the "many differences" in the, positions of the two countries and revivs
deadlocked autonomy negotiations on, the future tof the 1.3 million
Palestinians in the Israeli-occupied West Bank of the'Jordan River and Gaza
Strip.
Haig made clear here and in Jerusalem that only a few formalities stand
in the way of-the appointnient of Richard Fairbanks, a lawyer and campaign
supporter of President Reagan,, as his special assistant to press for progress
in the autonomy talks.
Tax planned to computerize
air traffic control system,
WASHINGTON- The Reagan administration said yesterday it will seek
sharp increases in aviation taxes to pay for a $1-billion-a-year modernization
of the air traffic control system-a plan that envisions shifting many duties
from humans to computers.
The plan includes raising the tax on airline tickets from 5 percent to 8 per-
cent. Taxes on regular and jet fuels also would be boosted.
Congressional sources estimated the cost of the modernization at between
$8.3 billion and $10 billion. FAA Administrator J. Lynn Helms said "just un-
der $1.5 billion" a year is projected to be spent (uring the peak development
years of 1985 through 1987.
The modernization program, unveiled by Helms in a two-hour briefing for
industry representatives, calls for the purchase of new computers within the
next few years, new computer programs by 1988 and a variety of technology
by the mid-1990s to allow the FAA to handle an increlsing number of air-
craft, reduce manpower, and close scores of facilities.
Senate approves penalty
for-crimes against elderly
LANSING- People convicted of injuring a senior citizen or physically
handicapped person while committing a crime face a mandatory two-year
prison term under a bill passed by the Senate yesterday.
The measure was sent to the House on a 23-5 vote, even though the head of
the Senate Judiciary Committee expressed doubts about its con-
stitutionality.
The few opponents of the'measure complained it was ineffective and un-
constitutional to single out a specific group for special protection.
Under the bill, those convicted of causing any kind of injury to a person
over age 60 or to a "visibly physically handicapped" individual would be hit
with an additional two year prison term on top of their'sentence for the crime
itself.

6
I,
E
t

I

be MicbWan Bat-IV

I
I

Vol. XCII, No. 98
Friday, January 29, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mmor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The-Michigan Uaily is a member of the Associated Pressand subscribes to United Press International
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles imes Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552: 76-DAILY, Sports desk. 764-0562: Circulation. 764-0558: Classified Advertising,
764-0557: Display advertising. 764-0554. Billing. 764-0550.

.T__

:,

Editor-in-chief..................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor..............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor................LORENiO ENET
News Editor...................... DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors ..........-CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor.................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors ............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Arts Editors ................... RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Chief Photographer.............PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell. Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brion Mosck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Jonathan Stewart. Richard
Walk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, James Clinton Mark.Dighton,
Adam Knee, Gail Negbour, Carol Pnemon, Ben Ticho.
NEWS STAFF:. John Adam, Beth Allen. Andrew Chap-
man, Perry Clark, David Crawford, Lisa Crumrine,
Ann Marie Fazio, Patn Fickinger, Lou Fintor. Joyce
Frieden, Mark Gindin, Julie Hinds, Steve Hook,
Kathlyn Hoover, HorIn Kahn, Pamela Kromer, Mindy
Layne, Mike McIntyre., Jennifer Miller, Anne Mytych,
Nancy Newman, Dan Oberrotmon, Stacy Powell,
Janet Rae, Kent Redding, Sean Ross, Lauren
Rousseau, Susan Sharon, David Spok, Lisa SpectoV,
Fannie Weinstein. Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker. Jesse Barkin. Tam Ben-
tley. Randy Berger, Mark Borowski. Joe Chapelle.
Laura Clark, Mortho Crall, -Jim Dworman, Karen Floch,
Larry Freed Matt Henehan, Chuck 'Joffe. John Kerr.
Doug Levy, Jim Lombard. Larry Mishkin, Don
Newman. Andrew Ookes. Ron Pollock. Jeff
Quicksilver, Sarah Sherber. Kenny Shore. James
Thompson, Josie VonVoigtlonder, Kent Walley. Karl
Wheatley. Chris Wilson. Bob Woinowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager BARB FORSLUND
Operations manager *SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager a. .MARY ANN MISI:WICZ
Classifieds Manager DEtIISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager ICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Display Manager NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator E ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF Liz Altman Hope Barron. Alan Blum
Daniel Bowen Lindsay Bray. Joseph 9rodo Glen Con
tor Alexander DePillis. Susan Epps Wendy Fox
Sebastian Frcka. Mark Freeman. Morci Gittelman
Pamela Gould Kathryn Hendrick Anthony Interrante
Indre Liutkus Beth Kovinsky. Coryn Notiss Felice
Oper. Jodi Pollock' Ann Sochar. Michael Sovitt
Michael Seltzer Karen Silverstein. Sam Slaughter
Nancy Thompson Jeffrey Voight

I

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SMTWT FS S M'T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
SEPE M BER OCTOBER NOVEMBER1 DECEMBER
12 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4'5
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 1011121314 6 8 9101112
13 1 15 1 171819 11 -131415 1617 1,51 1718 19 2021
20 222324 25 26 18 20 21 22 23 24 22 24 25i6'4- 2-28
25 29 ?2 7 28 9 30 99_04
JUAEA__CA982
JARY FEBRUJARY 1 MARCH APRIL

I _I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan