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January 28, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-28

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Page 2-Thursday, January 28, 1982-The Michigan Daily

4

Boston divers hunt for lost men

BOSTON - A passenger on the DC-10
jetliper that, slid into Boston Harbor
said esterday he was ignored when he
tried to tell officials that he saw
souieone disappear under the icy
wthey kept on saying everyone was
all right, but I couldn't get it out of my
mindI what I saw,'" Donald Welsh said a
day after World Airways officials con-
firmed that two men were missing and
feared drowned in the aftermath of the
accident Saturday night.
AIR WORLD, officials had insisted
since the accident that there were 208
passengers and crew aboard and that

all were accounted for. But on
Tuesday, Edward Ringo, senior vice
president of the air carrier, said Walter
Metcalf, 69, and his son Leo, 40, both of
Dedham, Mass. were missing. ,
Federal officials sealed off the area
around the wreck of the DC-10 yester-
day as divers searched the ice-dotted
waters of Boston Harbor for the Met-
calfs.
Ringo and officials with the
Massachusetts Port Authority, which
operates the airport, said they
discovered carry-on luggage belonging
to the elder Metcalf after relatives ap-
proached state police Tuesday.

FAMILY MEMBERS, who tried for
two days to learn their relatives'
whereabouts, complained that World
Airways would not give them infor-
mation, nor would port officials help.
Welsh, 25, a student at Tufts Univer-
sity dental school in Boston, said he was
seated in the front section of the plane
when it rolled off the runway at Logan
Internatinal Airport upon landing and
went into the frigid water.
The cockpit section of the plane
sheared off, flooding his cabin with sea
water. Welsh said he and several other
passengers helped rescue the flight
crew from the water.

HE SAID HE recalled seeing the
Metcalfs sititng in front row seats,
which disappeared in the accident.
"After we took those four people out
of the water, one guy said,'Look over
there!' I saw somebody floundering
about 25 feet off to the left of the plane.
We tore off some cushions and threw
them to him, but soon after the person
disappeared under the water."
Welsh said he told a firefighter and a
police officer what he witnessed but
said, "theywere all runningaround
pretty frantic" rescuing passengers.

School lab chemicals
WASHINGTON (AP) Some of the yesterday.
chemicals used in high school The staff, which said this finding was
laboratories may cause cancer or birth "very preliminary," was ordered by
defects, the staff of the Consumer the commissioners to tell lab instruc-
Product Safety Commission reported tors about the latest evaluations of
possibly tokic chemicals in time for the
TONIGHT Tnext school year.
SEC CHANCE THE STAFF, in its first report on this
presents subject, said it surveyed schools to see
U- which chemicals they keep on hand and
compared this to lists of substances
he DTTILIES tlt have been linked to cancer or birth
516 E. Liberty 9- defects.

may cause
Commission staffer Abbie Gerber
said most of this information came
from second-hand or third-hand sour'
ces and that CPSC has tested few of
these chemicals.
However, the stock chemicals repor-
tedly in at least some schools include
benzene, benzidene, and formaldehyde
- suspected causes of cancer which the
commission already has acted against
when they are used in consumer
. products..
THE SURVEY found that among 312

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chemicals found in school labs, 27 were
recognized or suspected carcinogens,
- cancer-causing substances - and 11
were teratogens, substances that can
cause birth defects.
The staff also said that chemical
storage and disposal practices appear
to vary widely. Approximately half of
the respondents indicated that
laboratories are not equipped with
eyewashes, fire extinguishers, and fire
blankets. Fifteen of the 22 respondents
indicated that a wall chart and safety
manual "would be useful."
The CPSC staff was concerned
maidly about chronic health hazards
but it also found reports of 61 injuries
linked to school labs over a three-year
period. Chemical burns accounted for
39 of these and there were 12 cases of
dermatitis, a skin condition, and one
death due to carbon monoxide.
"Y" SUMMER CAMPS
The Ann Arbor Y is now accepting
applications for staff positions at
the following camps:
CAMP AL-GON-QUIAN: a, resident
camp for boys and girls locatd on Burt Loke in
northern Mich. Camp dates are June 21 to
August 7. Senior staff positions, ages iB and
above ore available in the following areas:
horseback riding, sailing, canoeing, arts and
crafts, trips director, archery, nature, woodwork-
ing. riflery, land sports, swimming, water skiing,
and comp nurse. Salary plus room and board."
CAMP BIRKETT:; A day camp for boys and
girls-located on Silver Lake nor Pinckney.. Camp
dates are June 21-August 20. Senior staff posi-
tions, ages 18 and above are available in the
following areas: Archery, swimming, sailing,
canoeing. arts" and crafts, nature, and general
counselor.
Applications and additional infor-
mation regarding positions at
both camps may be obtained by
contacting the Ann Arbor Y. 350
South Fifth Ave., Ann Arbor,
Mich. 48104 or calling (313) 443-
0534.
An Equal Opportunity Employer

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Auto talks hit-citical stage
DETROIT-Contract talks between the United Auto Workers and General
Motors reached the critical stage yesterday amid reports the union wants to
reopen negotiations whenever car sales improve dramatically.
Bargaining entered the final stages with less than 48 hours remaining
before the union's deadline at midnight tonight. Talks were expected late in-
to the evening and possibly all night following a late night session-Tuesday.
"We're prepared to stay all night or as long as necessary," said a GM
spokesman.
The UAW wants the new contract to contain a clause calling for renewed
negotiations should car sales im rove dramatically. No sales boom is expec-
te for at least the next six montIs, but union officials reasoned the so-called
"reopener" clause would reassure their members.
State moves to close
chemical disposal plant
LANSING- The head of the state's air pollution control office said yester-
day he will recommend permanent closure of a Shelby Township chemical
incinerator where two men died in a toxic chemical accident earlier this
month.
Robert Miller of the Department of Naturpl Resources said he will advise
the state Air Pollution Control commission next month to deny a permanent
operating permit to Liquid Disposal Inc. and to take steps to revoke its tem-
porary licenses.
Two workers died and nine other people were injured Jan. 13 when
chemical residue in equipment reacted with a new shipment of waste to form
a toxic gas.
Study finds Laetrile useless
BOSTON- The first study of Laetrile by recognized cancer scientists has
shown the controversial extract of apricot pits is useless for treatment of.
cancer, researchers said yesterday.
A research team headed by the Mayo Clinic reported only one out of 175 in-
curable patients given Laetrile and placed on the diet commonly prescribed
with the drug began to show progress, but he later worsened and died.
Most of the others died in an average of five months, said Dr. Charles
Moertel, who headed the study. The surviving 25 are close-to death.
Loneliness linked to;illness
SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C- People with few friends and limited social
contacts may be more. vulnerable to'heart disease and other illnesses, a
California scientist said yesterday.
Dr. S. Leonard Syme of the University of California said in a report
presented to an American Heart Association meeting that four major studies
now support the theory that social isolation has a role in disease.
"My hypothesis is that this social support business somehow affects the
body's vulnerability, affects the defense system as to whether or not you
become vulnerable to the effect of these heart disease risk factors," Syme
said.
Syme emphasized, however, that more research is needed before social
isolation can be added to the commonly accepted list of factors that.increase
a person's risk of developing heart disease.
Guerrillas attack air base
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador-- Guerrillas attacked El Salvador's
biggest air force base yesterday damaging four U.S.-made helicopters and
six warplanes with a barrage of armor-piercing rockets and machine-gun
fire, witnesses said.
"Doors were torn away, landing gear was damaged. I would not say they
were destroyed, but it'll be some time before they fly again," said an
American of the Ilopango Air Force base.
The American, who asked to remain anonymous, said he saw four U.S.-
supplied "Huey" helicopters and sixi -nidentified jets damaged on the apron
of the airport on the eastern edge of the capital, San Salvador.
A U.S. Embassy spokesmen said none of the U.S. military advisers
teaching the Salvadoran air force how to fly and repair the Hueys was at the
base at the time of the two-hour pre-dawn attack.

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E- Systems continues
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Vol. XCII, No. 97
Thursday, January 28, 1982
The Michigan Daily is. edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Loily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552; 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562; Circulation, 76;0558; Classified Advertising,
764-0557: Display advertising. 764-0554: Billing, 764-0550.

Editor-in-chief...................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor................JULIE ENGEgRECHT
University Editor................LORENZO BENET
News Editor ................. .DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors..........CHARLES THOMSON I
KEVIN TOTTIS1
Sports Editor..................MARK MIHANOViC
Associate Sports Editors ...........GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Arts Editors ................... RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Chief Photographer ...............PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kimn ,Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Jonathan Stewart, Richard
Wolk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, James Clinton, Mark Dighton,
Adam Knee, Gail Negbour, Carol Pneman, Ben Ticho.-
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Andrew Chap-
man, Perri Clark, David Crawford, Lisa Crumrine,
Ann Marie Fazio, Pam Fickinger, Lou Fintor; Joyce
Frieden, Mark Gindin, Julie Hinds, Steve Hook,:
Kathlyn Hoover. Harlan Kahn, Pamela Kramer, Mindy
Layne, Mike Mcintyre, Jennifer Miller, Anne Mytych,
Nancy Newman, Dan Oberrotmon, Stacy Powell,
Janet Roe, Kent Redding, Sean Ross, Lauren
Rousseau, Susan Sharon, David Spok, Lisa Spector,
Fannie Weinstein, Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Jesse Barkin, Tam Ben-
fley, Randy Berger, Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle,
Louro Clark, Martha Croll, Jim Dworman, Karen Floch;
Larry Freed. Matt Henehan, Chuck Joffe, John Kerr.
Doug Levy, Jim Lombard. Larry Mishkin, Dan
Newman. Andrew Oakes, Ron Pollack, Jeff
Quicksilver, Saroh Sherber, Kenny Shore, James
Thompson, Josie VonVoigtlonder. Kent Walley, Karl
Wheatley, Chris Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF

Business Manager ...
Sales Manager........
Operations manager.
Display Manager.
Clossifieds Manager....
Finance Manager.
Assistant Display Manager.
Nationals tAanoger ...
Circulation Manager ....
Sales Coordinotor....

RANDI CIGELNIK
BARB FORSLUND
...SUSANNE KELLY
MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
DENISE SULIVAN
MICHAEL YORICK
-NANCY JOSLIN
SUSAN RABUSHKA
E KIM WOODS
E. ANDREW PETERSEN

BUSINESS STAFF' Liz Altman. Hope Barron. Ajon Blum.
Daniel Bowen, Lindsay Bray. Joseph Brodo. Glen Can-
tor. Alexander DePillis. Susan Epps. Wendy Fox.
Sebastian Frcko. Mork Freeman. Marci Gittelmon.
Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hendrick. Anthony Interrante.
Indre Liutkus. Beth Kovinsky, Caryn Notiss. Felice
Oper. Jodi Pollock. Ann Sachor. Michael Sovitt.
Michael Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter,
Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voight

I

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SM T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
SLPE M BER OCTOBER NOVEM BER DECEM BER
- 1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
10 J11 12 4 6 7 8 9 10 .8 10 11 12J13 14 6 8 9+J 10J11 12
131 15161718 19 11 13 14 15 16 17 151 1718 19 2021
2O 22 23 24 25 26 18 20 21 22 23 24 22 24 25 964248
27 29 30 2' 6?7 28 29 30 311
____ '198Q2'
A V rnnreAOM 01

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