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January 24, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE

PUZZLE

ARTS

By Don Rubin

"The Katzenjammer Kids,"
by Rudolph Dirks, was the
first successful comic strip to
make regular and systematic
use of voice balloons for
dialogue.
The following balloons are
from a variety of famous
comics that have been
stipped of their familiar
illustrations. We'd like you to
identify as many as possible.
Last week's solution:
This is Ceratitis capitata.
,There were two in the puzzle.
) 1981 United Feature Syndicate. Inc
The following people answered
last week's puzzle correctly:
Linda Felber
Daniel Wishart
Stephen Cohen
Sue Deziel
Su Weidenthal
Gary Antonick
Mike Rafeld
Fed up with these crazy puzzles?
Would you like to get even with Don
Rubin and win $10 to boot? Then
send your original ideas for The
Puzzle to, The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, 48109.
All entries will become the property,
of United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
.(You only win the big bucks if we
use your puzzle idea.)
Send your completed puzzle to the
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Ar-
Ibor, MI 48109 by Wednesday of next
week. One person will 'be selected at
random from the correct entries to win
a free Michigan Daily T-shirt.

Strip Tease

TIe Michigan Daily Sunday January 24, 1982 Page 5
Diana: Tuneful
endlessly lovely.

0OYB. 9., YOUQ
REALLY TREAT
YOOR WOMEN
jiKE OR T!
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BIN A-BASHIN TH'
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14
IAMBUR6 ER
To W 5516 17 1

By Bob Harris
WHEN DIANA Ross popped onto
the stage at the Joe Louis Arena
Friday night, she began to make more
than just the usual kind of music. For
the heart, she sang with as much sin-
cerity and warmth as any entertainer
conceivably could muster. For the soul,
she sang almost as much of peace and.
compassion as she did of romantic love.
And for the eye, she presented
multifarious aspects of elegance,
grace, and sheer sexiness, all dressed
in her inimitable style.
The lady, who is drawing nigh to
having spent forty glorious years on the
planet, seems to have developed a
remarkably amicable relationship with
Father Time. She remains absolutely
free to play the little girl, skipping ef-
fortlessly, beguilingly about the stage,
her face a stunning showcase of
carefree, naivete. Then she can as
easily turn around and all but become
Billie Holiday, her voice a melange of
painful experience and a dark, almost
impenetrably mysterious eroticism.
The concertgoers at 'Friday's early
show, who left nary a seat unoccupied,
were treated to a broad sampling of
tunes from every period in Ross'
career. There was a breathless medley
of Supremes hits, followed by tunes
from Ross' first solo albums, material
from her films, and topped off by heavy
attention to her most recent successes:
"Endless Love" (with an offstage
Lionel Ritchie sound-alike providing
the harmony), "Why Do Fools Fall In
Love? "-this sounding a little funkier,
at least, than the sterile disc ver-

sion-and her latest chartbuster-to-be,
"Mirror, Mirror."
Joe Louis couldn't' possibly be a
singer's idea of an ideal place to per-
form; with audience on every side, the
artist has to be constantly turning to
keep any one side from feeling
deprived. Ross was able to keep all her
fans happy Friday night, and showed no
preference for Coleman Young, who
occupied a prime seat in what might
have been considered the front of the
house.
The "show biz" aspects of the concert
were nicely handled as well; the
lighting was quite subtle when it needed
to be, particularly the delicate lavender',
pinspot that gave us a silhouetted Diana
during her "Lady Sings The Blues"
material.
Glorious too was her billowing gown,
a shimmering imitator of the Milky
Way, which gave way about halfway
through the concert to display a snug
jumpsuit that enticingly demonstrated
how very gentlemanly Father Time'has
been.
Perhaps thanks are due Omni, which
produced the concert, for what on its
face seemed to be the one horrendous
decision made in- preparation for the
Ross event. Something called Micki
Free (I hesitate to use the personal
pronoun), was permitted 30 minutes of
vulgarity before the featured attraction
rescued the audience. This strutting,
screaming monstrosity of 'a rock-and-
roller left an audience infuriated and
hearing-impaired, a real shame in light
of the delights to follow. Thank you,
Omni, for pointing up by way of con-
trast the unerringly classy, magical
qualities of the angel who concluded the
set.

1)
2)
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7)
8)

10)
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18)

Coal miners' deaths:

Conigresskeyto budget amendment

s ur safety
FRANKFORT, Ky. (UPI) - Coal is
king in Kentucky. But lately coal has'
been a killer. A rash of accidents in the.
past few weeks have claimed at least 35 r
miners in Appalachia-19 in Kentucky-
and the deaths prompted Gov. John t
Brown to call a safety summit next
week in Frankfort.
e- er ' ~po
fre
SOP9
d r5'.tL..-)

inquiry
Miners keep dying, but officials note.
most deaths happen one or two at a
time. Such fatalities are often traced to
miner carelessness or illegal
operations.
GOV. BROWN said a group represen-
ting all phases of the industty-
opera tors, the UMW, state and federal
safety and health agencies and the
governor himself -will meet next week.
The exact date hasn't been set because
Stanley is investigating the Floyd Coun-
ty explosion.
The Comic Opera Guild
presents
MICHIGAN THEATRE
v Ticketson sale:
Mchgan TheatreBox Office:2-6 pm. Mon.-Sat.
also at Hudson's Briarwood and Wherehouse Records

WASHINGTON (AP) - Backers of a
balanced-budget amendment to the
Constitution say they are near victory
in their campaign for a constitutional
convention, but are pinning their real
hopes on Congress.
Their chief lobbyist says it may take
prodding from voters to get Congress to
act.
"THERE IS NO question, politically,
you aren't going to have a convention,"

George Snyder, president of the
National Taxpayers Union, conceded in
an interview.
But he predicted that, "As soon as we
get another state-or it could happen
any time now-the United States
Senate will pass the resolution and send
it to the House of Representatives."
Snyder says he thinks Rep. Peter
Rodino (D-N.J.), chairman of the
House Judiciary Com'mittee, who op-

poses the amendment, will block House
action.
"BUT THE END of the scenario will
be by the elections of 1982 every can-
didate running for Congress will have to
take a position on this very vital issue,"
Snyder said.
The Constitution requires Congress to
call.a constitutional convention on the
demand of 34 of the state legislatures.
On Jan. 18, Alaska became the 31st

state to approve a resolution calling for
a balanced budget convention.
"We are not giving odds on it, but I
think we have a good chance of getting
additional states this year," said David
Keating, Washington spokesman for
the Taxpayers Union.
Snyder, a former majority leader of
the Maryland Senate, said the three
most likely states to be next in line are
Washington, Missouri and Kentucky.

Lawyers panel recommends gun control

From AP and UPI
CHICAGO - Controlling handguns is
the key to reducing crime in the United
States, the head of an American Bar
Association task force said yesterday.
"We do, not think that without effec-
tive gun control there can be any
solution to the crime problem in the
United States," said former Miami
'prosecutor Richard Gerstein.

THE ABA TASK force noted that FBI
statistics show that handguns were
used in about 50 percent of all murders
in the United States in 1980.
The task force said a person should be
allowed to keep a handgun at home or in
the office, but advocated stiff penalties
for possession of a handgun in public
and the use of a firearm during the
commission of a crime. It also recom-

mended a ban on possession of any
firearms for convicted felons and some
others.
"We recognize there will always be
vehement opposition to gun control,"
said Gerstein, who chaired the task for-
ce. "But the uniform feeling was that
no one's Second Amendment right to
bear arms would be violated if a person
is still allowed to possess a handgun in
his business or home."
The task force report, containing
. recommendations on gun control,
preventive detention, juvenile justice,
excessive criminal appeals and other

areas, was debated at a public hearing
yesterday. It was made public Dec. 28.
The report is not yet official ABA
policy. The policy-making branch of
the 285,000-member group is expected
to consider adoption of the recommen-
dations in August.
On Dec. 29, U.S. District Judge Ber-
nard Decker upheld a gun control or-
dinance enacted in the suburban
Chicago community of Morton Grove.
The measure, said to be the most
stringent in the nation, bans the sale
and possession of handguns, even those
acquired before the law was passed.

t :
WINTER SEASON 82
GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE
OSCAR
PETE.RSON
solo piano
Saturday, January 30
Hill Auditorium -8 P.M.
Tickets: $9.50, 8.50, 7.50
reserved, on sale now
Tickets on sale at the Michigan Union Box Of-
fice and CTC outlets. For more information
call 763-6922.

VILLAGE 4 375 N. MAPLE
.769-1300
BARGAIN SHOWS $2.508afore6PM Mon-Fri. Before 3 PM Sat-Sun
CAN THE STREET
THE REAL TRICK IS
STAYING ALIVE.
VIG12
sawwan
...Tire Rea! Story.
t
--TAVCO EMBASSY
PICTURES Release I 1

i "'

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