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January 22, 1982 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-22

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ARTS
The Michigan Daily Friday, January 22, 1982 Page 5

W

Clubs/Bars
Second Chance (516 E. Liberty; 994-
5360)
Mariner, the local band that didn't
open for the Stones not long ago,
returns with top 40 rock through
Sunday night.
Rick's American Cafe (611 Church;
996-2747)
The popular local group Sail Catz

brings its special blend of rock and
blues to the stage on Friday and
Saturday. New Wavers Gary Pryka
and the Scales perform on Sunday
night.
Joe's Star Lounge (109 N. Main;
665-5637)
The BlueFront Persuaders per-
form rhythm and blues at Joe's
through tomorrow evening.
Concerts
The Ark (1421 Hill; 761-1451)
Canadian folk-singer Stan Rogers
concludes his Ann Arbor stay with a
9:00 performance of ballads and
sing-alongs. On Saturday mime ar-
tist 0. J. Anderson displays his skill
and unique humor, as he did recen-
tly at the Fifth Ann Arbor Folk
Festival.
Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra
The Ann Arbor Chamber Or-
chestra, under the direction of Carl
Daehler, presents a selection of
classical music on Saturday at 8:30
p.m., in the Michigan Theatre. Tibor
Szasz solos in performances of
Mozart's "Piano Concerto No. 9"
and Enesco's "Symphonie de

Chambre, Op. 33." Other works on
the program include Mouret's "Or-
chestra Suite No. 1" and Mozart's
"Symphony No. 40 in G minor."
Call 996-0066 for more information.
Dance
The University Musical Society
The Oakland Ballet Company will
appear at 8 p.m., Jan. 25-27 in the
Power Center for the Performing
Arts.'
The program for Monday evening
features a tribute to famed Russian
ballet producer Sergei Diaghilev.
Tuesday's performance includes
choreographed renditions of
Maurice Ravel's "Bolero," as well
as selections by American composer
Aaron Copland. The Company will
conclude their Ann Arbor visit on
Wednesday with choreography by
artistic director Ronn Guidi.
For more information, call 665-
3717.
Exhibits
Alice Simsar Gallery (301 N. Main;
665-4883)
"Arcanum I-XIII," a collection of
thirteen prints by Robert Rauschen-
berg features the artist's modernist
use of various media, including
silkscreen, silk collage, water color
and stitching. The suite of works was
completed in New York in 1981.
University Museum of Art
Current works by University of
Michigan School of Art faculty who
received research grants from the
University's Horace H. Rackham
School of Graduate Studies will be on
view through February 28th. The
collection, including works of diver-
se personal style and media-pain-
tings, sculptures, photographs,
metalwork, ceramics, watercolors,
collages, prints and paper-
work-reflect the strength and
diversity of recent faculty accom-
plishments.

Fonda shines in'Golden Pond'

By James Clinton
FOR QUITE some time Jane Fonda
has sought a suitable property to
develop as a script for her father.
Evidently, her discrimination and
persistence have been rewarded, for On
Golden Pond, the fourth production by
her film company, is both a beautiful
film and the perfect vehicle to
showcase Henry Fonda's considerable
talent.
Based upon the play by Ernest
Thompson, it provides (rarity of
rarities) dialogue worth mouthing, and
a compact dramatic structure from
which to build. While the concerns of
the script are readily identifiable and
somewhat simplistic, they are
developed with an openness and in-
telligence rarely even hinted at in most
films today.
The structure is relatively simple: an
elderly couple are living out themtwilight
of their lives on beautiful Golden Pond.
Their idyllic, if somewhat contained,
existence is interrupted by the arrival
of their daughter, her new husband, and
his son. The daughter, not content to let
sleeping dogs lie, is quick to bring
unresolved conflicts from decades past
to the forefront. Naturally, difficulties
ensue and the focus of the rest of the
film resides in the evaluation and
resolution of these matters.
To his credit, director Mark Rydell
makes a concerted effort to adhere to
the barren structure of the play and

refuses to take on audience insurance
by incorporating visual gimmickry,
sex, or gratuitous violence. In
refraining from such tampering, he on-
ce again demonstrates a talent for let-
ting good material stand on its own, as
he did so admirably in his sensitively
rendered version of The Fox based on
the Lawrence book.
This film contains several fine per-
formances, but it is, first and foremost,
Henry Fonda's picture. This is the
finest role he's had since The Grapes of
Wrath and easily the performance of
his career. One of the last purveyors of
the natural school of acting (the others,
notably Tracy, Bogart, and Cooper, are
all dead), he brings everything at his
disposal to this role.
He is disciplined, yet oddly spon-
taneous. His characteristic under-
statedness is evident, but enriched by a
brooding melancholia, more associated
with the method school. He can be ten-
der and crusty in a single series of
facial movements. Above all, he gives
an economical performance; there is
not a wasted moment. When he adjusts
his glasses and then looks away, there
is a peculiar grace implying that this is
a man who has come to terms with his
own mortality and the impermanence
of everything around him.
This is a very different Henry Fonda
performance, as there is more of his
personal signature on this work. He
possesses a special grace in the bony
angularity of his movements that result
in a brilliant composite depiction of old

age. It's a brave, ambitious perfor-
mance wherein he strips away protec-
tive layers and gives himself totally to
the camera.
As his wife, Katherine Hepburn com-
plements him magnificantly. She com-
pensates for the loss of certain skills
(notably her magnificent voice, which
is a ravaged vestige of its former self)
by bringing to her role considerable
warmth, wisdom and intelligence. Her
power of concentration remains intact
and never for a moment does she cheat
by slipping out of her character and into
the famed Hepburn persona.
The chemistry between Hepburn and
Fonda is reminiscent of her work with
the late Spencer Tracy. The reverence
and emotion she- brings to their scenes

seem to propel Fonda to an un-
precedented level. This work con-,
stitutes something quite remarkable.
Rydell ;must be given much of the,
credit. By carefully arranging the#
various components to augment rather
than deter the interaction between they
two, he prevents cinematic distrac-
tions. Everything from the music to the
purposefully innocuous camera work IS'

at 1 5 i d 375 N. MAP 3E :
5769-1300
BARGAIN SHOWS 2,50 Before 6PM Mon-Fri. Before 3PM Sat-Sun -
AVO.MBSS373
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9:1P CTURES RELEASEse

Funny, funny George

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) -Funnyman
George Carlin has returned to the
recording studio to turn out his' seventh.
comedy record, hoping it will turn gold
as have four of his previous albums.
Titled "A Place to Put My Stuff," the
album is a departure for Carlin.
His first six records were composed
entirely of selections from various per-
sonal appearances before live and
'responsive audiences.
"A Place To Put My Stuff" includes
material recorded in a studio - sket-
ches with other performers, music, one-
*.liners and sound effects, all new
techniques for the stand-up monologist.
It's been five years since Carlin's last
album, a time for regrouping,
straightening out his personal life and
reassessing his career.
Not the least of the comic's accom-
plishments in that span of years was
kicking a heavy cocaine habit which he
believes nearly destroyed him per-
sonally and professionally.
Carlin has been compared with Len-
ny Bruce and Mort Sahl, mostly

because his humor is anti-establish-
ment and scatological. But he goes for
laughs more often than the heavy social
commentary of Bruce and Sahl.
The only point Carlin wants to make
is that he is funny. He has three distinct
performance profiles, shrewdly adap-
ting his material to fit the tastes and
expectations of audiences at concerts,
on recordings and in television ap-
pearances.
He has appeared on Johnny Carson's
show more than 100 times in the past 14
years. Recently he has limited almost
all his appearances on the show to
guest-host status when Carson is on
vacation.
Like most comedians, Carlin is a
thoughtfully intense man, about as fun-
ny off-stage as an embalmer. Quiet
desperation is the mark of most suc-
cessful comics who, when 'working,
need a laugh every 10 seconds to keep
from dying.
Carlin will be performing at the
Royal Oak Music Theater on February
12th.

Something's Happening at the U-Club!
Enjoy your favorite games
in the comfortable atmosphere
of the University Club
every Monday night 8-12:30
THE UNIVERSITY CLUB
"IT'S HERE FOR YOU! "

MICHIGAN UNION

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NOMINATED FOR a GOLDEN 0108EAWAROS k
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LORD GRADE Presents
An ITC Films/IPC Films Production A bI.ARK RYDELL Film
KATHARINE HEPBURN HENRY FONDA
_ JANE FONDA:
S 5W44IN(i t "ON GOLDEN POND" r,,
DOUG McKEON DABNEY COLEWL\ tVILLIAM LANTEAU DAVE GRt'SIN : .
BRUCE GILBERT BILLY WILLIA1ISe.s.c. ERNEST THOMPSON .NARK RYDELL
-; - P('= PARENTAL GUIDANCE SUGGESTED ft
... .. . ,11 SOME MATERIAL MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR CN0.DREN ..

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