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January 20, 1982 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-20

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1-
k
i
y
SPORTS t

T4e Michigan Daily.

Wednesday, January 20, 1982

Page 7

Diliienfle

7

Gymnast Beckwith makes hard work pay off

By JESSE BARKIN
"Kathy!"
"Kathy Beckwith!"
YELLING FROM across the gym at
the Coliseum where the women's gym-
nastic team practices five days a week,
coach Sheri Hyatt tried to get thi atten-
tion of the Wolverines' top all-arounder,
who was working out on the balance
beam. But there was no response from
the sophomore gymnast.
Hyatt tried again, "Kathy, you're
wanted for an interview!" No luck. It
wasn't until Beckwith had completed
her routine with a front flip dismount
that she was able to hear her coach.
Though it was only a Monday practice,
just two days after she had captured the
all-around title against Illinois and five
days before her next meet, Beckwith
was concentrating as if it were the
Olympics.
"Her concentration is tremendous,"
Hyatt said, "She works hard. She
comes in (to practice) and knows what
she needs to do, and does it. That's
what makes her so good."
SO GOOD, IN fact, that she is quickly
becoming the best women's gymnast in
Michigan history. Last year she set an
all-time high mark in the all-around

(39.95) and was the first Wolverine ever
to qualify for nationals.
"She's definitely the best by the rules
we have now," Hyatt said. "It's hard to
determine, though, because the mode of
scoring is different than it used to be."
Raised in Richmond Hill, Ontario,
Beckwith has only been competing in
the United States since last year, and
had to work very hard to prove herself
when she came to Miehigan.
"I ONIX SAW films of her," Hyatt
said, "so I was skeptical of her ability.
When she came, she was overweight
and I was even more skeptical. But her
hard work and determination paid off."
Paid off may be an understatement
judging by the sophomore's perfor-
mances. In the Illinois meet, Beckwith
took first in each event and notched her
season high in the all-around (35.75). At
this point in the season, she is ahead of
last year's pace.-
"I want to hit a 36 all-around,"' the
quiet gymnast confessed. "Last year I
came .05 away and last week I was only
.25 away. And since this is early in the
season, I think hopefully that I will get
it."
BUT THESE results are not easy to
come by. Besides practicing constan-

tly, Beckwith must contend with an af-
fliction which strikes may athletes -
the jitters.
"I seem to be more nervous each
meet," Beckwith said. I figured that
with all these competitions (one every
week) I would get less nervous, but it
seems that with every meet I get more
nervous."
When she begins her routine, though,
it sems as if her calming techniques
always work..
"HER MAIN point is consistency,"
Hyatt said, "She hits well .all the time
and that is very hard to do. Very rarely
does she make a mistake at a meet."
Last year at nationals, Beckwith
placed 41st out of about 160 com-

petitors. "This year I hope to do a lot
better," she said. "Last year I was
really nervous. I didn't have the team
behind me. But this year we've got a
good chance of going."
The team is important to Beckwith.
"Coming from a club (in Ontario) it's
different," she said. "Everyone on
your team is competing against each
other, but here (Michigan) you are
competing as a team. It makes it more
fun."
Just then Hyatt sarcastically yelled
from across the gym,'"Beckwith! What
are you doing, dictating a novel?" It
wasn't a serious call for her to get back
to work, but Beckwith realized she
should get back. After all, hard work is
what has made her what she is.

LS&A SCHOLARSHIP
LSA Scholarship applications for Spring-Sum-
mer 1982 and Fall-Winter 1982-83 will be avail-
able in 1121 Angell Hall beginning January 18,
1982.
To qualify for scholarship consideration, a student must be an
LSA undergraduate and have completed one full term in
LSA. Sophomores must have a U of M grade point of 3.7"or
better and Juniors and Seniors must have a GPA of at least
3.6. The awards are based on financial need and on academic
merit. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED TO
1221 ANGELL HALL BY FEBRUARY 12.
MICHIGAN
-ION
15 Off A l
Michigan Memorabilia
January 11 through January 29
Union Stop-First Floor-Michigan Union

4

BASKETBALL
RESIDENCE HALL
CLASS A
Schemps 31, Michigan House 26: Despite an early nine point lead, Michigan
House fell apart due to substitutions and the Schemps went ahead at half-
time 24-23. In the second half, Michigan House employed a zone defense
which forced the Schemps to shoot from the outside. However, Michigan
House was not able to muster any offense due to captain Dave Smith's exit
from thecontest with a sprained ankle. The Schemps used the stall well and
led by Joe Kopeyer's 15 points and Mark Mazur's steals earned victory num-
ber one.
Blagdon 74, Mojo Raiders 34: Even without center Sam Gunj3lagdon troun-
ced the Mojo Raiders. Taking advantage of easy fast break baskets and its
leaping ability, Blagdon jumped out to-an 18 point lead at halftime. Doug
Venable led the squad with 18 points and commented. "Their 2-1-2 zone
didn't stop us ... we must have shot 75 percent from the field." Brad Yaker
and Jimmy Latham were also hot from.the outside, hitting 17 and 14 points
respectively. Latham commented, "Yeah, we play well as a team .. .we
have it." Scott Kalt shared the optimism, boasting, "We are the team to
beat!"
FRATERNITY
KPhi Delta Theta 38, Lambda Chi Alpha 29: The Phi Delts took a 6-0 lead and
never looked back as they shot well and dominated the boards. A tightly
packed 2-3 zone effectively rebounded Lambda Chi's missed shots. Doug
Stuart's ten points paced the Phi Delt's whose balanced attack will 'make
ahem-a contender this season. A series of Phi Delt turnovers late in the con-
test put Lambda Chi within five points, but the Phi Delts withstood the
charge and notched the victory.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 51, Chi Psi 20: Sigma Alpha Epsilon hit its first four
shots to take an immediate 8-0 lead. The important factor in the first half
was SAE's strong defense, as SAE held Chi Psi to just nine points in the first
two quarters. Although the man-to-man defense was spectacular, SAE star-
ted 'the second half in a 1-3-1 zone. "We tried it just for practice," said cap-
tain Jeff Harris. The 1-3-1 zone did not hold too well and the SAEs quickly
switched back to the man-to-man.-.
Paul Freyermuth led the seven-man SAE squad with 16 points. Jeff Harris
had nine points and the rest of the team each scored eight. "We played really
well as a team," said Harris. "There was no single star... we jelled, even
without practice."
INDEPENDENT
Big Dogs 58, Heidelbergers 31: The Big Dogs' initial ten unanswered points
and full-court press stunned its opponent. Steve Knudsen led the Big Dogs in
scoring and Brian Kwait led the team in steals. Yet it was their height ad-
vantage and pressure defense that yielded the win.
Beaver Patrol 48, Rage in the Cage 23: A change in defense was the key to
the Beaver Patrol's victory. After being down by two, 16-14, at the end of a
slow first half, the Beaver Patrol switched from an inefficient zone defense
to a hustling man to man, and ran the Rage wild. The Patrol's hot shooting
formed into a balanced offense and a tight game became a rout.
The IM Digest relates briefly the activities of the Michigan intramural
program during the previous week. This week's information was
compiled by Daily sportswriter Chuck Whitman.

,

-~NEI

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rida.
_~

Is

1 !

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
FEA TURING
STEVE NARDELLA
Cover Charge $2.00-8:30 P.M.
DRINK SPECIALS
NEW! Happy Hour Snack Menu 4-7 P.M.
The University Club
Michigan Union
IT'S HERE FOR YOU!

ti
',

iI.

Sports Information Photo
SOPHOMORE KATHY BECKWITH puts the finishing touches on her floor
exercise routine as she prepares for the women's gymnastics meet against
Western Michigan and Kent State Saturday. '

BILLBOARD
Entries for the all-campus' and
fraternity water polo competition,
along with the women's innertube
water polo signup will be due in the In-
tramural Sports Building at 4:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, January 26.
This winter's intramural ice hockey
officials. clinic will be held tonight and
Thursday night at 10:00 p.m. at Yost Ice
Arena. In addition, there will be a
meeting for all intramural hockey
managers tomorrow night at 7:00 p.m.
in the IM Building wrestling room.
SCORES
NBA
Atlanta 112, Portland 101
Boston 111, New York 107
College Basketball
Villanova 48, Notre Dame 46
Manhattan 74, Yale 65
Fairfield $1, Army 51
Clark 81, Connecticut College 76
Clenville state 71,.w. Va. wesleyan 63
Hamilton 80, Hobart 45
Lenoir-Rhyne 85, Barber Scotia 62
-Thomas More 71. Clinch Valley 589

(''

Saudi rabian Students
SAUDI AMERICAN BANK
is offering outstanding career opportunities for qualified Saudi Arabian stu-
dents to become members of the management team of the dynamic, new and
expanding Saudi American Bank in.Saudi Arabia.
Several new branches are scheduled to open throughout Saudi Arabia in
the next few years to augment already existing branches in Riyadh, Jeddah and
Al Khobar.
Plan to attend a general orientation/briefing meeting Wednesday, Janu-
ary 20th, at 8:00 p.m. in the Lounge Area of the International.Center, to hear
first hand the latest news of the growth and progress of the Kingdom and
the part Saudi American Bank is playing in these fast-paced and accelerating
activities.
Mr. Frank E. Lund, Director, University Relations, will be on campus
during the week of January 20th to conduct this lmeeting and to interview
interested Saudi students individually Thursday, January 21st.
Excellent salary, benefits, training programs, and career opportunities are
available.
Through special arrangements and cooperation with responsible government
officials in the offices of the Civil Service Bureau and the Ministry of Higher
Education, Riyadh, qualified students may receive letters of release from their
various ministerial obligations through the auspices of Saudi American Bank
to accept a career assignment.

1982 HOPWOOD
UNDERCLASSMEN
AWARDS
Academy of American Poets, Bain-Swiggett,
& MichaelR. Gutterrnan Poetry Awards
JeffrejL. Weisberg Freshman Poetry Award
Roy W Cowden Memorial Fellowship
Reading by
STANLEY KUNITZ
P'Xx, Assy Y~~~oPw

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