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January 19, 1982 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Pick a
Winner.A
in
Israel
A great opportunity
to get acquainted with
Kibbutz while learning the
Hebrew language. Earn from 6 to #
8 college credits at Haifay
University. Several other
university-related programs
available. Contact:
KIBB 114 Fifth Avenue
New York, N.Y. 10011
(212) 255-1338

Page 2-Tuesday, January 19, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Service stations gain
as temperatures drop

(Continued from Page 1)
Herdenescher said, but Discount
Towing still reported three hour delays.
"WE HAVEN'T stopped since
yesterday. We're 20 cars behind right
now," serviceman James Patterson of
Discount said. Frozen spark plugs
run-down batteries were the most
common problems, according to Pat-
terson, who said most of the station's
calls came from motorists stranded at
their homes.
Most services had between two and
five trucks on the road and charged an
average of $20 for a tow and $15 for a
jump start.
Cab companies reported waits bet-
ween 15 minutes and one hour. As with
the service stations, most of the calls
came from drivers who couldn't get
their cars out of their driveways, said
Don Harrison, owner of Veterans Cabs.
THE ARCTIC weather also boosted
sales for auto supply dealers. Sales
were described as "phenomenal" by

Rick Cohen, president of Great Lakes
Hardware and Auto, on North Maple
Road in Ann Arbor.
"Extreme temperature affects cars
and when that happens they come to
their local automotive parts dealer," he
said. Defrosting chemicals, anti-
freeze, de-icer and jumper cables were,
the top sellers according to Cohen.
The extreme cold also hurts sales,
according to John Sutter, assistant
manager of Big-A Auto Parts, on North
Ashley Street. "The cold weather is
helping sales but killing it in other
ways," Sutter said.
"IT SLOWS DOWN the do-it-yourself
market...Nobody is going to crawl un-
der their car in their driveway and put
in an exhaust system," he said.
Restaurants reported that they were
suffering only a slight drop in business.
"I think it has affected business
somewhat. People tend to sit longer,"
said Darla Cochran, supervisor of the
Stagedoor Restaurant.

Arctic air causes
problems for tenants

ANNUAL

.

SA LE
~'~~ NOW IN PROGRESS
\ f
*3SAVE TO5O
ALL REMAINING STOCK
of Fall and Winter Merchandise
ON WOMEN'S CLASSIC
I" "*SUITS " BLAZERS " SLACKS
* SKIRTS " ROBES * SWEATERS
* SHOES * BLOUSES * SHIRTS
ON MEN'S CLASSIC
\ i SUITS * SPORTCOATS
* SLACKS * SWEATERS
"OSHIRTS * JACKETS
" COATS

SAVE
UP 30
TO OFF

WHILE PRESENT QUANTITIES LAST
EmeythingFor TeMn
PARK FREE IN
APPAREL FOR WOMEN CARPONARE
WILL VALIDATE
306-310 S. STATE ST. * ANN ARBOR YOURTICKET.

(Continued from Page 1)
January 11.
For tenants experiencing weather-
related housing problems, Kostin
recommends first explaining the
problem to the landlord and, if the
situation is not resolved quickly, con-
tacting the city building inspector's of-
fice to make sure the building meets the
requirements of the city code.
"We'll investigate every complaint
we get," said William Yadlosky, super-
visor of the city's Housing Bureau.
ACCORDING TO Yadlosky, if a
housing unit does not meet the city code
and if the situation is not corrected, an
inspector can declare the dwelling
uninhabitable or,force the landlord to
provide supplemental heating with
devices such as electric heaters.
Yadlosky explained that the Ann Ar-
..
Campus assault
A man was injured by a knife-
wielding attacker-while--walking near
the School of Education Building at
10:50 p.m. Friday night, police said
yesterday. The attacker ran up to the
victim from behind, pushed him to the
ground, and cut him once on the thigh.
The attacker then fled.
The victim went to Martha Cook
residence hall for assistance. Police
has no suspects.
Apartments burglarized
Thieves entered a residence in the
2200 block of Fuller betwen midnight
and 8 a.m. on Jan. 16. A cassette player
worth $100 and an amplifier valued at
$85 were taken. Police found no signs of
forced entry.
An apartment in the 1900 block of
Plymouth Rd. was burglarized between
7:00 p.m. and 7:40 p.m. on Jan. 15,
police said yesterday. Two television
sets and some coins, valued at $447,
were taken. Entry was gained by for-
cing open a window.
A similar robbery occurred between
8:10 a.m. and 8:55 p.m. in the 1700 block
of Broadview on Jan. 16, police said.
A window was forced open, and a color
television set, some coins, and jewelry
were taken. The stolen items were
valued at $440.00
SHORT OR LONG,
Hairsty les for
Men and Women
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State ........668-9329
East U. at South U......662-0354
Arborland ..............971-9975
Maple Village ...........761-2733

bor Housing Code specifies that each
dwelling must be able to maintain a
temperature of at least 70 degrees
Fahrenheit three feet above the floor
when the outside temperature is 5
degrees.
"But what do you do when it's minus
eighteen (degrees)?" said Mary
Holland, a housing advisor in the Off-
Campus Housing and Mediation Ser-
vices office.
Holland said that Mediation Services
provides counselors who will try to
mediate difficulties between landlords
and their student dwellers.
"We try to make sure the other side is
aware there is a problem," Holland
said, adding that students are invited to
call the office if they have problems
with their landlords.

MON.-WED. &SAT.
9.6.30
THURS. FRI.
9-430

IN-BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
UAW ponders Ford offer
DETROIT- United Auto Workers negotiators yesterday were mulling
over a response to a Ford Motor Co. proposal that reportedly offers workers
job security based on seniority in exchange for cuts in labor costs.
Meanwhile, UAW President Douglas Fraser led his bargaining team in
discussions of economic issues with General Motors Corp. as the second
week of early contract talks with the auto industry began.
The UAW has set a Saturday deadline for completing its talks at Ford and
GM.
Reports said the Ford offer made last week calls for job guarantees based
on the number of years a worker has been with the company. The proposal
set no specific minimum of amount of service, however.
Job security is one of the UAW's biggest goals in the current talks.
Reagan urges school tax law
WASHINGTON- President Reagan asked Congress yesterday to bar him
from granting tax-exempt status to schools and colleges that discriminate
against blacks.
While the legislation is pending, officials said, the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice generally won't enforce Reagan's decision, announced Jan. 8, to permit
schools that practice racial discrimination to qualify for exemption from
federal income taxes as charitable institutions.
However, because Reagan technically isn't backing off his original
decision, two schools whose court cases prompted that action will receive
the tax-exempt status they sought, at least temporarily. If the bill passes as
the administration proposed it, the two schools would lose their newly gran-
ted exemptions, and the revocations would be retroactive, the officials said.
The measure would recognize the right of any religious school to give
preference or priority to members of a particular religious organization or
belief. But it would bar a tax exemption to any such school if its "policy,
program, preference or priority is based upon race or a belief that requires
discrimination on the basis of race."
Brickley joins governor race
LANSING- Lt. Gov. James Brickley is expected to announce that he will
run for governor today, leaving only a decision by tax limitation author
Richard Headlee to complete the GOP gubernatorial picture.
Brickley as called a news conference for 9 a.m. to "announce his political
plans for 19i," and aides have conceded that no real surprise should be ex-
pected.
The entry by Brickley into the fray has been viewed as a certainty since
Gov. William Milliken last month announced that he will not seek re-
election.
Milliken is strongly supporting Brickley, who has served under him now
for seven years.
The lieutenant governor has received some statewide attention with a
petition drive calling for the appointment rather than election for appellate
courts and state education boards. But the campaign has hardly fired the
popular imagination.
Potomac search continues
WASHINGTON- Salvage crews hoisted the tail of an Air Florida jetliner
from the frigid grime of the Potomac River yesterday, but the achievement
turned sour when the crumpled section failed to yield two flight recorders
which could unravel the causes of last week's fatal crash.
Investigators were initially exultant when, after battling the frozen river
for five days, divers managed to tie straps under the Boeing 737's tail and lift
it from a crane on the bridge overhead.
As the 15-foot section was pulled up, it broke away from parts of the
jetliner's fuselage.
Searching through an area the size of a football field and operating nearly
blindfolded with fisibility of 6 to 8 inches, divers earlier yesterday pulled the
47th body from the river.
The grim task was hampered by extreme cold and vicious winds. Fifty-one
bodies have been retrieved, including four motorists killed when the plane
raked across the bridge and struck several cars.
Vol. XCII, No. 89
Tuesday, January 19, 1982
The Michigan Daily is. edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid-at Ann Arbor,. Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan"oily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Pres International,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.

News room: (313) 764-0552;76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562; Circulation, 764-0558: Clossified Advertising,
764-0557; Display advertising. 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

0

U

Gunman robs party store
The Ann Arbor Party Center at 1612
Jackson Avenue was robbed on Jan. 16
at 5:35 p.m., police said. A customer
entered the store, placed some
groceries on the counter, then produced
a handgun and demanded money. A
small amount of money was taken from
the cash register and placed in a bag for
the bandit. He then fired a shot into the
counter and fled. No one was injured.
State rep. hits pedestrian
State Rep. Perry Bullard, (D-Ann Ar-
bor), struck a university student while
driving near campus Sunday night,
police said yesterday. Bullard was nor-
thbound on State St. and making a right
turn onto Huron St. when he hit Julie
Selbst, 20, of 315 N. State St., Ann Ar-
bor. Police said Selbst was crossing
with the walk light, and that Bullard
had a green light, but failed to yield to
her. Bullard said he did not see Selbst
in time to stop, according to police
reports. , No violation was issued to
Bullard. Selbst received minor in-
juries, and went to University Hospital
for treatment, police said.
East Quad resident hit
An East Quad resident received minor
injuries when she was struck by a car
early Sunday morning, police said
yesterday. Maya Bernstein, 18, of 206
Strauss House, apparently ran from
behind a parked car into Church St. at
2:58 a.m. and was hit by a vehicle
heading south. The driver of the
vehicle, Paul Nieckhoff, 21, of 1600 Ed-
sall, Trenton, Mich., tried to stop, but
was unable to do so, police said, No
violation was issued to Nieckhoff.

0
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Editor-in-chief...................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor..............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor................LORENZO BENET
News Editor.................. .DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors..........CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor.................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors............ GREG DeGIJLIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Arts Editors...................RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Chief Photographer...............PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Jonathon Stewart, Richard
Wolk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, James Clinton, Mark Dighton,
Adam Knee, Gail Negbour, Carol Pnemon, Ben Ticho.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Andrew Chap.
man, Perry Clark, David Crawford, Lisa Crumrine,
Ann Marie Fazio, Pamt Fickinger, Lou Fintor, Joyce
Frieden,Mark Gindin, Julie Hinds, Steve Hook,
Kathlyn Hoover, Harlan Kohn, Pamelo Kromer, Mindy
Layne, Mike McIntyre, Jennifer Miller, Anne Mytych,
Nancy Newman, Don Oberrotman, Stacy Powell,
Janet Roe, Kent Redding, Sean Ross, Lauren
Rousseau, Susan Sharon, David Spok, Lisa Spector,
Fannie Weinstein, Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Jesse Barkin, Tam Ben-
tley, Randy Berger, Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle,
Laura ClarkMartha Crall, Jim DwormonKaren Floch,
Larry Freed. Matt Henehon, Chuck Joffe, John Kerr,
Doug .Levy, Jim Lombard, Larry Mishkin, Don
Newman, Andrew Oakes, Ron Pollack, Jeff
Quicksilver, Sarah Sherber, Kenny Shore, James
Thompson, Josie VonVoigtlander, Kent Walley, Karl
Wheatley, Chris Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager..............RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager....... ......... BARB fORSLUND
Operations manager............SUSANNE KELLY
DisplyManae ..........MARYANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager............ DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager..............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Display Manager ....... NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator ...........E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman. Hope Barron. Alan Blum.
Daniel Bowen. Lindsay Bray. Joseph Brodo. Glen Con-
tor. 'Alexander DePillis. Susan Epps, Wendy fox.
Sebastian Frcko. Mark Freeman. Morci Gittelmon.
Pamela Gould, Kathryn Hendrick. Anthony Interrante.
Indre Liutkus, Beth Kovinsky. Caryn Notiss, Felice
Oper. Jodi Pollock. Ann Sachar. Michael Sovitt.
Michael Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter.
Noncy Thompson. Jeffrey Voight.

Right now, you're probably in a
career frenzy. Who wouldn't be
with so many options, so many
people giving you well-
intentioned advice. Do you feel
like you're running around in cir-
cles, with time gaining fast? Slow
down, take a deep breath, and
consider the options logically.
NL Industries is a very logical
option. We're a diversified For-
tune 200 company with major
divisions in oilfield equipment,
petroleum services, chemicals,
and metals. The work we do is
absorbing and very important in
today's economy. We're involved
in areas of rapid growth and
development with unlimited
opportunities for talented
professionals.
Now doesn't that include just
ahout evervthina on your list?

The night before our interview,
January 26 from 7-9 PM, we will
be hosting a company presenta-
tion in the West Engineeudng
Building, Room #244. Please plan
to attend! Refreshments will be
served.
We will also be interviewing
upcoming graduates with
MBA DEGREES
and we would like to visit with
you in person
Friday
January 29
We will be hosting this presenta-
tion the night before our inter-
views, January 28 in the Business
Administration Building, Room
#141 at 7PM.
Register at your campus career
placement office, or send us your

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F.S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
a-- -6-.1 23 1 3 4 5-6 7 1 2 3 4 5
10t11 12 4 6 78 9 10 8 10 11712 13 14 6 8 9 '0 11'2
131 15 16 17 18 19 11 13 14 15 16 17 15 17 1819 20 21
20 22 23 24 25 26 1842021 22 23 24 22 24 25 6 -e-R -
____ r ARHAP1982
JANUARY I FEBRUARY 1 MARCH 1 APRIL

0

I

IenceinaningIu e wjiecii~irois, rinengneeing

Lim,

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