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December 05, 1980 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-12-05

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Page 14-Friday, December 5, 1980-The Michigan Daily
MICHIGAN THEATRE
presents the
VAUDEVILLE '80 CHRISTMAS SHOW
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1I980-7:30 pm

Poland may seek Soviet

The Films
"Thr1e Man Who Came to
Dinner "(1942)
"The Nutcracker" (1965)

aid, party
From AP and UPI
WARSAW, Poland - A Communist Party Central
Committee member raised for the first time yester-
day the possibility of a request for Soviet assistance
in the Polish crisis, and Western nations warned the
Soviet Union against military intervention.
Josef Klasa, head of Central Committee's press
department, told a news conference the Polish
leadership would ask for Soviet and Warsaw Pact
help if authority "slipped into the hands of anti-
socialist elements" or if "socialism became en-
dangered." But he said it would be imprudent to try
to solve the, country's problems "with the help of
military forces," and he believed Poland would
resolve the crisis by itself.
HE DISCUSSED the question of assistance from
other communist countries only after persistent
questions by reporters about the possibility of Soviet
military intervention.
Klasa said, "I think such endangering would occur
only when .authority would slip from the hands of
democracy into the hands of anti-socialist elements.
Then the Polish Communists would have the right
and duty to ask for assistance from the communists
of other countries."

leader says
In Moscow there were accusations that the West
was attempting to increase tension in Poland. There
have been mounting fears in some Western capitals
that the Soviets might intervene because of
widespread worker discontent and pressures on the
Polish Communist Party leadership for liberal
reforms.
POLAND'S CONTROLLED newspapers prominen-
tly displayed a speech by a new Politburo member
rejecting the use of force against militant members
of the new independent unions, and a deputy premier
told a French newspaper that threats of Soviet inter-
vention were exaggerated.
A day after President Carter spoke of an "un-
precedented buildup" of Soviet forces along the
Polish border, the Carter administration cautioned
Moscow that Americans were united in their concern
over the possibility of a Soviet intervention.
Carter and President-elect Ronald Reagan yester-
day sent the Soviet Union a clear, unified signal,
warning that any attempt to exploit the change in
American administrations by moving against Poland
would be "a grave miscalculation."

S

now available

11

U I

Checking

NOVEMBER 29: A TRAGIC DAY
IN HISTORY FOR THE
PALESTINIANS.
The Arabs have rejected a British report call-

interest
may hurt

a

ing for dividing Palestine into two

states, one

NOVEMBER 29, 1937

Jewish and one Arab.

Arab revolts against the

NOVEMBER 29, 1947

British continue, killing many Jews and Arab
moderates.
The U.N. Security Council votes to divide Pales-
tine into two states, one Jewish and one Arab,
but the Arabs reject partition and launch a war
to claim all of Palestine. Jordan and Egypt annex
much of proposed Palestinian homeland.
After President Sadat's visit to Israel and in spite
of President Carter's entreaties, the PLO refuses
to change its National Covenant calling for the
destruction of Israel; therefore, the Palestinians
remain outside the peace process.
The P.L.O. leadership recently reaffirms its intent
to destroy Israel, its support for the Soviet Union
and places the U.S. "at the top of the enemies

NOVEMBER 29, 1977

patrons
(Continued from Page )
required for free checking services and
penalties for withdrawals below the
minimum.
Ann Arbor Bank and Trust, Huro
Valley National Bank,. and National
Bankmand Trust will require $1,000
minimum balances for free checking
-with interest, compared to an average
$200 minimum for regular accounts.
"Basically, the reason they're so high
(minimum balances) is to discourage
people who don't have a lot in their ac-
count from using checking with in-
terest. If there were no minimums and
penalties, the bank couldn't afford t
give interest," said Aileen Murray,
Huron Valley National Bank's new ac-
counts secretary.
THE NEW interest option is a
provision of the Depository Institutions
Deregulation and Monetary Control Act
passed last March. It was designed to
encourage people to maintain a higher
balance in checking accounts, which
would serve to increase banks' money
supplies.
Students and others who typically
keep a relatively low balance in thei
checking accounts are better off with
regular no-interest acccounts, Murray
said.
Depositors should realize that the
per-check and penalty charges on ac-
counts with less than the minimum
required for free checking would cancel
out gains from the interest, and may
even lead to losses, she said.
CHARLES LAHEY, an Ann Arbor
Bank and Trust executive, said the in
terest checking accounts would be best
for "those students who have $1,000 to
deposit." But, he added, "experience
has shown that the average student just
doesn't keep that much in his account."
Local credit unions have 'been
allowed to offer interest on checking
accounts for the past five years. In-
terest rates at the credit unions are
lower than those of commercial banks'
but restrictions are fewer.
The Ann Arbor Co-op Credit Union
open to all University students, offers a
checking service with interest called a
"Share Draft Account" that has no
minimum balance and no service
charge.
"Students shouldn't be penalized for
withdrawing their own money," said
Leo Murray, manager of the credit
union. "We have been offering a free
account with interest for years. Now
the banks have seen the light."
"If you don't have the dough you
could end up being worse in the new ac-
counts than in regular checking," said
Robert Hofmann, manager of the
University of Michigan Employee's
Credit Union.
'U' drafts
housing plan'
for foreign
students
tcontinued from Page

NOVEMBER 29, 1980

of our people." (Damascus)

Intransigence still

keeps the Palestinians out of the peace process.
THE TRUE TRAGEDY OF THE PALESTINIANS:
43 YEARS OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR A
PALESTINIAN HOMELAND LOST THROUGH
ARAB REFUSALS TO COMPROMISE

YOUTH INSTITUTE FOR PEACE IN
THE MIDDLE EAST
6399 WILSHIRE BLVD., SUITE 1007
LOS ANGELES, CA 90048
[ Send me more information on the
tragedy of the Palestinians.

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