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December 05, 1980 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
OF JERUSALEM
1981/82 PROGRAMS FOR AMERICAN STUDENTS

h

Page 12-Friday, December 5, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Improvi- gi

Ex-M'sar Hubbard
scoring in the pros

0 ONE YEAR PROGRAM-for
college sophomores and
juniors.
0 REGULAR STUDIES-for
college transfer students
toward B.A. and B.Sc. degrees.

Q GRADUATE
STUDIES-Master's,
Doctoral and Visiting
Graduate programs.
O SUMMER COURSES-
given in English.

PLEASE CHECK DESIRED PROGRAM
For Application and Information, write:
Office of Academic Affairs
American Friends of the Het rew University
1140 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036 (212) 840-5820

Name.
Addres

S

By BOB WOJNOWSKI
When Phil Hubbard was announced
as the Detroit Pistons' third first-round
draft pick in the 1979 college basketball
draft, the gallery gathered in the
Silverdome booed. When Phil Hubbard
returns to Ann Arbor to attend a
Michigan basketball game, as he often
does, he receives something far less
than a hero's welcome. In fact, his
presence is rarely acknowledged. His
career statistics at Michigan are im-
pressive (fifth all-time leading scorer),
but the manner in which he left is what
sours the ardent fans..

For Further Information On Campus, Contact:
PROF. JUHUDA REINGARZ
Dept. of History-Haven Hail
764.8547

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He came out of Canton, Ohio as one of
the most highly publicized recruits in
Michigan basketball history, and his
first two years as. a Wolverine did
nothing to dispel the lofty expectations,
But then there was the knee injury prior
to his junior year. And the somewhat
subpar '78-79 season. And the signing
with the Pistons after he had said he
was coming back to Michigan for his
final year of eligibility. And the boos.
"IT WAS TOUGH," Hubbard says
now of his first season as a Piston. "But
I don't regret leaving (Michigan), I
regret we had such a terrible season
last year.
"Playing in the NBA was just
something I always wanted to do and I
thought it (signing with the Pistons)
was as good a chance as any."
In looking for reasons to explain
Hubbard's change of mind and his
signing with the Pistons, the most
common hypothesis is that the spot
where Hubbard was picked (midway
through the first round), meant big
money, and an offer than could not be
refused.
"BEING PICKED in the first round
and all definitely helped (to make the
decision). I just decided to take my
chances."
The aidjustment from college to the
pros was an especially tough one for
Hubbard. He was joining a rebuilding
team and there was a midseason

coaching change to compound matters.
He was also playing on a knee which
some doubted was completely sound.
But Hubbard does not use injury as an
excuse for his poor (nine points and five
rebounds average per game) season.
The problem in adjusting was simple,
"You can't adjust if you're not
playing," he deadpans.
AFTER A SLOW start this year,
Hubbard has been coming on strong of

hard. We've got a new coach and a new
system and we've had a lot of, injuries,
but we've been playing hard all season
long," said Hubbard.
Despite the rigors of a pro basketball
season, Hubbard finds time to maintain
close ties with the Michigan basketball
team.
"I FOLLOW THE team. I tried to get
to the Windsor game last Monday but
couldn't make it," he explains. "I'm
friends with most of them and I still
keep in touch with alot of my old team-
mates."
Hubbard also feels that hard-working
rookie head coach Bill Frieder will do a
"fantastic job."
And the team as a whole? Hubbard.
stops just short of being non-committal.
"I think they'll do pretty good," he of-
fers.
Despite two NCAA tournament ap-
pearances and a berth on the 1976 U.S.
Olympic team, Hubbard recalls no vic-
tory which stands out as memorable.
"THEY WERE all big victories. I
think the ones in the NCAA's might
have been the biggest, but no particular
victory stands out.
"They were all fun though. In fact, I
enjoyed most of my career."
But most is not all. Hubbard is reluc
tant to call his Michigan career a
whole-hearted success. But his recent
play as a Piston seems to indicate that
better times are just ahead.

late, as have the Pistons as a whole. He
has averaged better than 20 points per
game over the last five games and
sparkled in an 18 point, 15 rebound per-
formance against Atlanta. The new-
found success, according to Hubbard,
has been a culmination of hardwork
which Piston coach Scotty Robertson
has resolutely stressed.
"The whole team's been playing real

Waters choppy as tankers open
season amid much uncertainty

By CHUCK HARTWIG
A feeling of uncertainty surrounds
the men's swimming team as it
prepares to open its season this Satur-
day against Eastern Michigan at Matt
Mann Pool.
"We're in almost a rebuilding year,"
says Coach Bill Farley. "Right now
we're an average swimming team."
Farley thinks that the team will have a
tough time matching its performance of
last season when the Wolverines
finished second in the Big Ten and 15th
in the country.,

The uncertainty on the team stems
from several factors. First of all, the
team has had many injuries in its early
practices, and several swimmers, in-
cluding All-American freestyler Fer-
rfando Canales, are not working out at
full strength yet.
Still another uncertainty is created
by the eligibility question involving
diver Kevin Machemer, dnother All-
American. He is locked in a rules
dispute involving scholarship eligibility
of transfer students. Machemer -is
currently able to compete. However,
the situation could change pending a

_ l

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HOME OF "CHEAP BIGFOOT"

When. you u'e catching
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Tired of PAYING More
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decision from the Big Ten, which has
been deliberating for months on, a -
ruling.
To further complicate matters, the
team is a very young one which must
count on strong performances from
many untested freshmen if it hopes to,
have any chance at challenging last
year's record. Coach Farley sums up
the situation well when he says, "We're
in a very tenuous position right now."
Farley is quick to add, however, that
the season could still be a very good one
for the team if everything falls into'
place. The team hopes to be able to
make a training trip to Puerto Rico
over winter vacation in order to concen-
trate on intense training for the Big Ten
season which opens on January 15th.
Farley believes the trip is a key to
the team's chances for success this
year. "We're in a position where we
have one chance for a good season, and
that is by hard work," said Farley.
The most important swimmers on
this year's team are Canales, Bob
Murray, and Tom Ernsting. Canales is '
expected to have another outstanding'r;
year, although he is still recovering
from an injury. Murray was also an All-
american pick last year, and Farley
thinks he will be awesome this year,
while Ernsting is expected to really
blossom into a nationally prominent
swimmer this season.
The divers, who Farley considers to
be "the strongest part of our team," are
led by the embroiled All-american
Machemer. Mark McMann and. Jon
Beachwill alsobecounted on heavily.
Farley hopes to use Saturday's
opener as an opportunity to get some
experience under pressure for some of
his younger swimmers, and as a
measuring stick of the progress of the
veterans. The meet will be held at 1:00 1
p.m. on Saturday at Matt Mann pool.
Farley feels that with a strong perfor-
mance in this meet, and continued
steady work, the team does have a
chance to end up better than last year,
with a strong national ranking.

BASKETBALL-TENNIS-
RUNNING

2 blocks off State

406. E. Liberty

OPEN TONIGHT FOR MIDNIGHT MADNESS

i

I

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF JOB OPENINGS FOR 1981-82
INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS
Monday, Dec. 1-Wednesday, Dec. 10, 1980
MOSHER/JORDAN-December 1, Monday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Jordan Lounge
COUZENS-December 1, Monday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-Living Room
EAST QUAD-December 2, Tuesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Room 126
MARKLEY-December 2, Tuesday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-North Pit
ALICE LLOYD-December 2, Tuesday, 9:00-10:00 P.M.-Blue Carpet Lounge
WEST QUAD
BARBOUR & NEWBERRY-December 3, Wednesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Dining Room 1,
West Quad
SOUTH QUAD-December 3, Wednesday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-West Lounge
OXFORD-December 3, Wednesday, 9:00-10:00 P.M.-Geddes Conference Room
(Max Kade)
BURSLEY-December 4, Thursday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-East Lounge
STOCK WELL-December 4, Thursday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-Main Lounge
MINORITY PEER ADVISORS:
BURSLEY-December 8, Monday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Minority Lounge
COUZENS-December 9, Tuesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Minority Lounge
~iU ~iL An% - .A.rmn.u..,I .-, 7lav.:.A. PM.-Afrn Lunae

A

Have a ball! Come experience the,
most unique and exciting attraction
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for the game: Universal Studios Tour.
If you've never been to the world's
biggest and busiest movie studio
before, it's an incredible experience.
Because there's something new to
discover every day on our 420 movie
acres.
We'll take you behind the scenes

hours of'dazzling movie and TV
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films. And in our exciting
Entertainment Center, we'll treat you
to four live shows: Our latest thriller,
Castle Dracula; the Stunt Show; the
Animal Actors Stage; and the Screen
Test Theatre..

"Y. /

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