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December 04, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-12-04

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, December 4, 1980-Page 3
PROPOSED HOUSING PROJECT MAY DAMAGE FOREST
Environmental threat worries citizens

Guest's ring stolen
in Campus Inn
robbery

For the second time in two weeks,
a jewelry theft has been reported by
a guest at Campus Inn, police said
yesterday.
A hotel guest told police a diamond
ring, worth approximately $100, was
taken from a locked room sometime
between Sunday and Tuesday.
Police said there was no sign of for-
ced entry.
On Nov. 21, a burglar found an
unlocked room and allegedly stole
$17,000 worth of jewelry and cash,
including an $8,000 watch and a
$4,500 diamond ring.
Front desk manager Howard
Furry said such burglary incidents
are very rare at the Huron Street
hotel.} It is unprecedented for two
thefts to occur in such a short period,
he said.
Students injured
in auto accident on
snow-slicked roads
The snow-slickedroads Tuesday
night led to an auto accident in
which two University students were
injured, police said yesterday.
LSA junior Richard Zanecki was
driving Mark Ziersk and Julie Fer-
nane south on Huron Parkway when
they were rear-ended by a skidding
car. Police said the car, driven by
Colin Bethke of Ann Arbor, was
unable tstop in time to avoid
Zanecki's vehicle.
Fernane, an LSA junior, was in
good condition yesterday at Univer-
sity Hospital. University art student
Zierski was treated for a minor head
cut and released, Tuesday night,
Zanecki said.

By PAM KRAMER
The future of 27 acres of forest and
fields near North Campus is eliciting
some unprecedented environmental
questions from a citizens' group, a
developer, and the city planning com-
mission.
The commission must decide whether
to honor the Citizens Concerned About
the Black Pond Development's petition
for formal participation in planning a
proposed residential development.
THE PETITION, submitted under
section five of the Michigan Environ-
mental Protection Act, is the first of its
kind ever presented in the city.
The MEPA, written by University
Law Prof. Joseph Sax, was enacted 10
years ago to insure that natural resour-
ces are protected from impairment or
destruction where there are
economically "feasible and prudent"
Ge o logi~sts
attempt to
forecast
quakes,
(Continued from Page 1)
over due for some "large earthquakes
in the excess of 8.0 (on the Richter'
Scale) in the next 20 to 30 years."
Malcolm Johnston, a former
University professor currently working
for the National Center for Earthquake
Research in Mineral Park, Calif., said
his organization is searching for any
clue as to what causes quakes that
"might offer any hope at all, from the
physical, to whathmight be called the
absurd."
Johnston said that while no quake-
predicting techniques have been per-
fected yet, he is reasonably optimistic
that scentists someday will be able to
warn persons before impending ear-
thquakes.
Scientists are studying hundreds of
quake-related occurrences.

alternatives.
"I SUSPECT he (Dahlmann) looks at
this (the revised plan) as sufficient in
meeting the law's requirements,"
Thomas Smedes, a member of the
citizens' group, said.
Smedes-said the group would have a
more difficult time proving that natural
resources are in danger, if, as Dahlman'
proposed in his second plan, there is no
development in the forested area.
Some areas of MEPA, including the
term "natural resources" have not yet
been defined fully by the courts. Trees
have been defined as natural resources,
but the group says many other things
which they consider natural resources
have not been defined by the courts as
such.

UNDER MEPA, the group is certain
their case against the second develop-
ment plan would be weakened and
would most likely fight it through
zoning ordinances since Dahlmann
must file for rezoning, Smedes said.
"In the long run I don't think there is
much of a gain" for the environment, if
the second plan is approved, Smedes
said.
HE SAID only the developer would
gain because the revised plan is both
less expensive because fewer trees
would be removed, and more
marketable because it offers future
residents more privacy.
The citizen's group said the residen-
tial development plan, if approved,
would destroy most of a hardwood

forest that covers one half of a 27-acre
area between Pontiac Trail and the
Leslie Golf Course. The group's mem-
bers want a formal role in the planning
process to ensure that their concerns
and suggestions are considered, said
University Law Prof. Steven Pepe, a
representative of the citizen's group.
TYPICALLY, individual residents
and groups concerned about proposed
developments voice their concerns
during public hearing sessions before

the planning commission and city
council approve or deny a plan.
The planning commission tabled ac-
tion on the petition last. week after a
meeting between developer Dennis
Dahlmann and representatives of the
Black Pond citizen's group.
At the meeting, Dahlmann presented
a possible alternate site plan which
would reduce the number of residential
units from 238 to 228. He said the
revised plan would leave the wooded
area undeveloped. y

The recruiter for Sony Language
Laboratory will interview interested
applicants on December 5th for
positions in teaching oral English in
Japan.
Make appointmentsat Career Planning and Placement Office.
(3rd floor, SAB: Phone: 764-7460)
SO NY

William Shakespeare's
ROMEO.{
JULIET
1980-81 GUEST ARTIST SERIES
at the POWER CENTER
TONIGHT-SATURDAY AT 8:00 pm
SUNDAY AT 2:00 pm
Tickets at PTP-M-F-10-1 and 2-5 VISA/MAS'rER CHARGE by Phone-764.0450
Power Center Box Office opens at 6:00 (763-3333)

"Welcome to the Grand Opening
of Osterman Jewelers.
Is a long way from
the Uof M Class.
of 1951,..but I've
learned a lot in ther.
meantime."
"Since I left Ann Arbor I've learned a little about life and a lot
about the jewelry business. (My family's been in it for over a half
a century.) In life, yOu get what you pay for. At Osterman's you'll
get even more. The trusted names in fine watches and gifts.
Inspired original designs in diamonds. (We import our own, so
you save on that step.) And most important, you get our people.
They're experts. But they're never too busy to be people. Yes.
I'm glad to be back and I think you'll see it reflected in our
beautiful new Osterman store. Welcome."

-HAPPENINGS-
FILMS
Cinema Guild-In Cold Blood, 7, 9:30p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Mediatrics-Coal Miner's Daughter, 7,9:30 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
PIRGIM-Guess Who's Coming to Breakfast; Bottle Babies, 7:30 p.m.,
Union Conf. Room.
A-V Services-Teenage Turn-On: Drinking and Drugs, 12:10 p.m., SPH'll
Aud.
Colorado Slide Shows-Annika, 8, 9p.m., 119 E. Liberety.
Classic Film Theatre-Rebel Without A Cause, 4, 7, 9 p.m., Michigan
Theatre.
PERFORMANCES
" Department of Theatre and Drama-"Romeo and Juliet," 8 p.m., Power
Center.
Three Plays by Eugene Ionesco, "The Lesson," "The Lender," and "The
Bald Soprano,"8 p.m., Alice Lloyd Hall.
Quiet Revolutions Theatre Company-"No More Masks," 8 p.m., Canter-
bury Loft.
UAC-"HelloDolly !" 8 p.., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Piano recital-Catherine Wilson, MM, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Violin Recital-Karen Damerau, BM, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
SPEAKERS
Journalism-Leonard Silk, "The Economic Scene," and Mark Silk,
"Business Reporting: Biased or On Target?" 3 p.m., Journalism Lounge.
Spartacus Youth League-"The Fight for Socialism," 7:30 p.m., Conf.
Rm. No. 5, Michigan Union.
Chemistry-Allyson White, "The Glassy State of PMMA," 4 p.m., Room
1200, Chem. Bldg.
Computer Information Systems Club-Management Consultng Seminar, 4
p.m., Hale Aud.
Japanese Studies-Robert Innes, "High Energy Prices and Japan's In-
dustrial Sructure in the '80s," noon, Lane Hall Commons.
Public Health-Ken Frisoff, "A National Health Service," 9p.m., Rm. 126,
East Quad.
Organization-Behavior and Industrial Relations Club-Joe White, "Civil
Service Reform," noon, Rm. 176, Bus. Ad.
Engineering-Nirmal Chaterjee, Computer Control of Process Plants, 11
a.m., 2084 East Engineering.
Biology-Susan Lindquist, "Heat Shock Proteins in Drosophila," noon,
1139 Nat. Sci.
Biology-Jeffrey McKelvey, "Cell-Free Studies on the liosynthesis and
Processing of Neurophysin and Brain Opiocortin Precursors," 3:45 p.m.,
1057 MHRI.
Psychology-Janusca Reykowski, "Social Categorization and
Psychological Distance: A Theoretical Controversy," 4 p.m., 6006 ISR
Founders' Rm.
MEETINGS
Coalition for a teach-in and demonstration on inauguration day-8 p.m.,
East Quad Greene Lounge.
LSA Academic Judiciary-Certification hearing for LSA Student Gover-
nment elections, 7 p.m., Anderson Room, Michigan Union.
Medical Center-Bible Study, 12:30 p.m., F2230 Mott Library.
Campus Weight Watchers-5:30 p.m., League Project Room.
PIRGIM-Consumer Task Force, 6:30 p.m., Michigan Union.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship-7 p.m., Union and League.
MSA-Task Force meeting, 7:30 p.m., 3909 Michigan Union.
Al Anon-8:30 p.m., N2815 U. Hospital (2nd level, NPI).
MISCELLANEOUS
Poetry reading-Kees Snoek, Pedro Gomez, 7:30 p.m., Guild House.
WUOM/Union-NPR's "A Question of Place" series, replay "Claude Levi-

.:. 4:
4 :

-Bill Osterman
Sale ends Dec. 24

DIAMOND
ENGAGEMENT
RING
in rich gold f
$250
Matching band $75
GENUINE
SAPPHIRE
AND
12-DIAMOND
COCKTAIL
RING
r4kt. gold setting
was $675, $309

iiak EL--

-- .. -- 1

u

14KT.
GOLD CHAIN
15" Serpentine
was $40.00
a - a a

LADIES SEIKO WATCH
was $175,
17 jewels, fashion link bracelet. $1 ff
From the Designer Series.

'I

.c
;t

DIAMOND
STUD
EARRINGS
Set in 14kt white or
yellow gold from
.02 TW carats
25% OFF
Prices starting at
$37.95

//

GENUINE
STONE RINGS
Ladies 14kt. gold,
ruby, sapphire, or
emerald with diamonds.
1 Diamond
was $175, $105
2 Diamondss
was $195, 117
3 Diamonds
was $225, $135

1979 Collectors Edition
HUMMELWERK
CHRISTMAS
ORNAMENTS
Reg. $10
'" $1.00

\ \ MAN'S
BRUSHED
GOLD
DIAMOND
INJC

FREE CROSS PEN!
Now through Dec. 25, 1980, if you apply and
qualify for an Osterman Charge Card and make a
purchase with your card, you will receive a special
Osterman Cross pen absolutely free.
Come in and take the first Osterman Charge

1'

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