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December 02, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Court to decide on funding for
schools with sex-biased hiring
(Coninued from Page 1)

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, December 2, 1980-Page 9
Christopher conveys U.S.
response to hostage terms

discrimination is entitled to a jury trial.
* AGREED TO decide whether a
federal worker who charges the
government with on-the-job age
discrimination is entitled to a jury
trial.
* Turned away the appeal of a
Washington D.C., man who sought to
be paid for the emotional duress and
loss of companionship he suffered
when his pet dog was injured in a car
accident.
* Cleared the way for the im-
prisonment of a man who says going
behind bars may cause his mental
ruin because he was a Nazi death
camp prisoner as a boy.
* Left intact a decision by New
York's highest court that forbids-
police in most instances to chase a
person who runs away when asked a

question.
In the Seattle University case,
government lawyers representing
the Department of Education are
asking the high court to rule that
Title IX of the Education Amen-
dments of 1972 extends protection
against sexual bias to teachers and
other school employees.
Title IX states that "no person, on
the basis of sex, shall be excluded
from participation in, be denied the
benefits of or be subjected to
discrimination under any education
program or activity receiving
federal assistance."
Some federal courts have ruled
that Title IX protects only "par-
ticipants in and beneficiaries of
federally assisted education
programs," most often students.

SEATTLE University, a private
school, was warned in June 1975 that
it had become the target of an in-
vestigation by the old Department of
Health, Education and Welfare.
HEW had received a complaint
from some faculty members in the
university's nursing school over
alleged sexual bias in the school's
pay scale. The complaint said such
discrimination violated Title IX.
The University sued HEW,
seeking to halt its investigation on
grounds that it was not authorized to
issue employment regulations under
Title IX.
A federal trial judge agreed with
the university, and the Ninth U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the
judge's ruling.

(Continued from Page i1)
executive branch can do, and what they
are constitutionally prevented from
doing.
Earlier yesterday, a ranking White
House official said the outcome of the
hostage situation remains impossible to
predict and the domestic political
situation in Iran is the crucial factor.
"The question continues to reside in
the political situation domestically in
Iran," the official said. "And I don't
know if there is any way to predict if,
how, when they will be able to resolve
it."
President-elect Ronald Reagan was
asked yesterday, meanwhile, about
reports that an Iranian official
suggested Iran might wait until Reagan
was inaugurated before releasing the
hostages. "Well, he's pretty foolish,"
Reagan said.
The White House official, who asked
not to be identified by name, said the
United States is trying to provide
clarification on points raised by Iran
about the U.S. response to Iran's four
conditions for the release of the

hostages.
He said Iran has enough individuals
who are familiar with the American
political situation "to obtain an in-
dependent assessment of what it is and
what is not possible under American
laws and the Constitution."
The United States has indicated to
Iran that it may not be fully able to
comply with all of Iran's demands
because of legal complications.
"Clearly political power in that coun-
try is divided amongst individuals and
factions and we've seen all along that
they have to reach a preconsensus to
deal with almost anything," the White
House official said.
"We have a fair and very reasonable
position," he said.
"You can't sit around here and guess
about these matters of their internal
political situation," he said. "We have
to proceed in a fair and reasonable
manner consistent with our laws and
our interests in the area and see what
comes of it."

INSTANT
CASHI
WE'RE PAYING
$1 -$2 PER DISC
FOR YOUR ALBUMS
IN GOOD SHAPE.
iRECOFDS
OPEN MON.-SAT. 10-6
209 S. STATE
769-7075

F' .

Officials
see chance
'of another
war in the
Mideast

(Continued from Page 1)
defend our country against whatever
attack or whichever enemy."
Jordan, whose King Hussein is con-
sidered among the most trusted Arab
allies of the United States, said it would
turn Jordan into a "flaming inferno to
burn every aggressor." Jordan
strengthened its forces on the border to
counter the Syrian deploymnet.
AT RAMTHA, the Jordanian border
crossing post, a young Jordanian
colonel told AP yesterday, "the
situation is very dangerous and
anything might happen any minute."
He said thousands of troops were
massed on both sides of the border and
"fighting may break out by accident in
a situation like this."

Saudi Prince Abdullah Bin Abdul-
Aziz, deputy prime minister and head
of the national guard, ended talks with
President Hafez Assad of Syria and
flew home. He had been expected by
Jordanian officials to visit Amman.
Shortly after Abdullah's departure
from Damascus, Vasily V. Kuznetsov,
Soviet first vice president, arrived to a
red-carpet welcome in the Syrian
capital to exchange ratification
documents of a new Soviet-Syrian
treaty of friendship and cooperation.
Kuznetsov was expected to discuss
the Syrian Jordan situation in addition
to participating in a ceremony ratifying
the treaty signed Oct. 8 in Moscow by
Assad and Soviet President Leonid I.
Brezhnev.

R iver 'fiows through changes

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF JOB OPENINGS FOR 1981-82
INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS
Monday, Dec. 1-Wednesday, Dec. 10, 1980
MOSHER/JORDAN-December 1, Monday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Jordan Lopnge
COUZENS-December 1, Monday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-Living Room
EAST QUAD-December 2, Tuesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Room 126
MARKLEY-December 2, Tuesday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-North Pit
ALICE LLOYD-December 2, Tuesday, 9:00-10:00 P.M.-Blue Carpet Lounge
WEST QUAD
BARBOUR & NEWBERRY-December 3, Wednesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Dining Room I,
West Quad
SOUTH QUAD-December 3, Wednesday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-West Lounge
OXFORD-December 3, Wednesday, 9:00-10:00 P.M.--Geddes Conference Room
(Max Kade),.
BURSLEY-December 4, Thursday, 7:00-8:00P.M.-East Lounge
STOCKWELL-December 4, Thursday, 8:00-9:00P.M.-Main Lounge
MINORITY PEER ADVISORS:
BURSLEY-December 8, Monday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Minority Lounge
COUZENS-December 9, Tuesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Minority Lounge
SOUTH QUAD-December 10, Wednesday\7:00-8:00 P.M.-Afro Lounge
NOTE: Other residence hals will not be holding informational meetings but will be accepting applications for
available positions: The above informational sessions for prospective staff applicants have been scheduled to dis-
cuss the dimensions and expectations of the various staff positions, how to apply in the building and/or
houses, who to contact, criteria to be used in the selection procedure and the number of positions that are
likely to be vacant.
DECEMBER 1, 1980: STAFF APPLICATION AVAILABLE IN HOUSING OFFICE, 1500 S.A.B.
DECEMBER 17, 1980: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION FORMS FOR REAPPLYING STAFF DUE IN
HOUSING OFFICE,1500 S.A.B.
JANUARY 12, 1980: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION FORMS FOR NEW APPLICANTS DUE IN
HOUSING OFFICE, 1500 S.A.B.
=NM

(Continued from Page Seven)
may pay attentive tribute to rock music
made before the 1970s, but they don't
get to the heart of almost anything hap-
pening circa 1980.
Nobody sings songs this way
anymore and for good reason. Goggle-
'eyed Buddy Hollyisms can't hope to
make it in a world that can create an
album like Second Edition, a world in
which innocence can sound like
somebody's idea of a cruel joke. The
punks have rightly ravaged once and
for all the idea that a shit-eating grin
and a clean nose can reserve for one a
mate and a place' lin heaven. 'Good
works and a head nobly bowed to fate
won't do it anymore (if they ever really
would); much of the most vital music of
the past few years has shown our world
a place where you better keep an ear
cocked to what they say about you
behind your back from the word go,
where even all the fight you have may
not be enough.
BUT SPRINGSTEEN will have none
of that. The River is great fun, but it's
cheap fun, because Sprigigsteen never
.n- L_ - -.

struggles terribly hard to make contact
with the world in which he lives. Both of
t'his feet are planted in a fantasy region
just the other side of Dear Hunter-land.
His noble-savage-with-a-guitar image
has cost him a terrible sum-the in-
nocence he wants can only be found in
the grooves of records made many
years ago; and so he lives, it would
seem, only within them and the
lifestyles they illustrate.
Ironically, that working class world
he means to lionize comes off about as
,potent as a water pistol. Whereas the
Iron City Houserockers (true blue
collar gladiators) might bust a bottle of
beer over your head in a rage, and
whereas the Rastas might organize
politically, the downtrodden class of
people sketched on The River just ac-
cept their fate and drive off into the
night. A midnight ride-how poetic. But
it denies such people their true rage, it
manipulates the facts of working class
bitterness for the sake of a
melodramatic gesture. As Peter Town-
shend said in better days, "it don't

really happen that way at all."
(Besides, the Iron City Houserockers
havethe last word as far as I'm concer-
ned on driving into the night: "I got a
gashog in the garage, I can't afford to
drive/I'd like to take the taxi, but I
can't afford the ride.")
When Darkness On The Edge Of
Town came out, it was almost too much
to digest. Yeah, there were the same
sort of people on Darkness as there are
on The River, yet they were people who
would never accept their fate. There
was a lot of hope on Darkness, but
crimping its edges on every side was
fear, a kind of fear that could only make
those it touched run a little faster.
Compared to all that, the four sides of
The River are a cakewalk, a stylish
backslide from that fear. I have always
been a great believer in the sort of
respect and admiration Springsteen
has shown for his fans, but listening to
The River makes me challenge it: it
seems so easy to be friendly when
you're not revealing anything of your-
self.

S
' t

C _
.,':/
c: fi J

. vkvoo

\1 J

we can keep you warm!*

i

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The Professor says,
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