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November 21, 1980 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 14-Friday, November 21, 1980-The Michigan Daily

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Prof s:.
Economic
outlook
improved

(Continued from Page 1)
rates increase, if there is another federal credit crunch like
that of last March, or if consumer optimism wanes, the
economy could go into another downswing.'
According to the study, the 1981 outlook is "more
suggestive of 1979, the last economic expansion year before a
recession, than of the typical first year of expansion,"
Hymans said.
THE INFLATION RATE, as measured by the consumption
deflator, while expected to drop from 10.5 to 9.7 percent, will
remain at a relatively high level.
One of the reasons for the maintenance of high prices will
be the continued high costs of energy, Hymans said. Oil

prices are;expected to increase further as current inven-
tories of crude oil decline and the decontrol of domestic crude
is completed.
This would cause gas prices at the pumps to increase about
ten to twelve cents per gallon above current levels, he added.
Combined with oil prices, farm prices are expected to boost
the overall price level in the coming year. A worldwide shor-
tage of sugar and sweeteners, U.S. cutbacks in meat and
poultry production, and the drought last summer will all
combine to push food prices up in the coming year, Hymans
said.

Administrator says
city in good shape

SA

.~ .................
...................................
..* . ~ . . *..... ~ *.* ,*,..........................................................
I

(Continued from Page 1)
according to Sprenkel, was city
council's action to reduce the total
tax levy from 18.8 mills to 16.7 mills,
which lessened the impact of in-
flation on property values.
City council's decision to increase
user fees in the majority of city
programs - including recreation,
landfill, building, airport, and plan-
ning services - will be beneficial in
the long-run, Sprenkel said. The
higher fees more accurately reflect
the actual cost of servicing the
specific users of each program, he
added.
Sprenkel cited several local
development projects that he-said
will help expand and diversify the
city's tax base. Examples include a
new Detroit Edison headquarters
facility and the $980,000 State Street
area revitalization project.
A THREE-FLOOR addition to the
Fourth and William parking struc-
ture, recently approved by council,
will help meet parking requirements
in the central business district, he
said.
Although there is currently a shor-
tage of office and business space in
the downtown area, Sprenkel said
the city is "taking a positive stance
to alleviate this deficiency."
Sprenkel also praised the city for

its progress in energy conservation.
"The city is currently involved in 13
energy projects," he noted.
But, Sprenkel added, this year has
not been all rosy for the city. The
severe thunder storm of July 16,
which caused $7 million in damages,
was one major crisis that called
upon the complete resources of the
city government, Sprenkel said.
Citing more bad news, he said that
municipal purchasing costs have
skyrocketed, especially for
petroleum products. "While the
average cost of products and living
had increased something like 92 per-
cent over a given period of time, cost
of materials purchased by local
governments had increased ap-
proximately 112-115 per cent," he
said.
The administrator said he is con-
cerned about the future, especially
in lieu .of police, fire, and other
collective bargaining contracts to be
negotiated in the next months.
"I do not look forward with any
great anticipation to the
negotiations . : . I suspect the
negotiations will be hard and time-
consuming because of in-
flation . . . and (financial) con-
straints placed upon the City of Ann
Arbor," he commented.

a

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4 I

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},
..

'Heaven

's

Gate' closes

4

HOLLYWOOD (UPI)-Not since
"Cleopatra," complicated by the
Elizabeth Taylor-Richard Burton
romance, has so costly and highly
publicized a movie caused greater
It's
PEEIRL
R'LLEY.
at
1140 South University
668-8411

anguish than "Heaven's Gate," a $40
million one-day flop:
United Artists pulled its lavish
western out of theaters after a single
day's exhibition in New York when
critics characterized it as a total
disaster.
THE FILM, which stars Kris Kristof-
ferson, Christopher Walken, and
Isabelle Huppert, ran 3 hours and 3
minutes with a 15-minute intermission.
Critic reaction was so negative that
an invitational press screening in Los
Angeles last night was canceled.
New York Times critic Vincent Can-
by wrote: "Nothing in the movie works
properly . . it's a jerry-built ship that
slides straight to the bottom at its
christening."

I

NO PAYMENTS
'til FEBRUARY
ON APPROVED
HIGHLAND REVOLVING
CHARGE ACCOUNTS

SAVE! HUNDREDS OF AUDIO COMPONENTS ARE
SPECIALLY LOW PRICED 10 AM TO 9 PM

NO
wonder
the pay
lousy,the
benefits
are
so great.

4

I

THESE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY "SATURDAY ONLY" BARGAINS:

PIONEER 20-WATT
AM/FM RECEIVER
Power output 20 watts per ch.
min. RMS at 8 ohm load from
20 to 20,000 hertz with no more
than 0.5% THD. SX-580. Limit 1.
s/ I
HER /

METAL TAPE COMPATIBLE

jMETAL TAPE COMPATIBLEI

I

RECORDS CASSETTES
SANYO RECORDER WITH
AM/FM RADIO BUILT-IN
Portable cassette recorder with
built-in condenser mics. Auto.
stop. Sleep timer. Model M9902.
Regular$99.88. Save $24.51!
$7548

u
KOSS HV-i STEREO
HEADPHONE BUY
A lightweight, high velocity
stereophone that delivers full-
range sound. Comfortable, fits
close to head. Regular $39.88.
*2693

I

SHARP METAL TAPE
CASSETTE DECK
Uses standard or metal tapes.
LED peak level display. With
Dolby noise reduction. Auto-
matic shut-off. RT-10. Reg. $108
a87

SANYO METAL TAPE
CASSETTE DECK
3-head stereo cassette deck.
2-motor solenoid-controlled
transport. Dolby noise reduc-
tion. RD5372. Regular $319.
p268g

-AA
E - - - '

/

As a volunteer, you'll get
to help America stand a little taller.
And you'll stand a little taller
yourself. America needs your help
or we wouldn't be asking. Your
community needs your help. People
eighteen or eighty: we don't care as
long as you do.
VISTA iscomng a live again.
Come alive with us. VISTA. Call
toll free: 800-424-8580. Or write

BSR MULTI-PLAY
BELT-DRIVE TURNTABLE
Fully automatic with S-shaped
Tone Arm. Bi-directional vis-
cous damped cue/pause control.
Tinted cover. 255SX. Reg. $59.
*46

PIONEER FULLY
AUTOMATIC TURNTABLE
Accurate quartz direct-drive
turntable with anti-feedback
cabinet. Includes base and
dust cover. PL-400. Reg. $158.
p1g26

a

SAVE! ADVENT
TWO-WAY SPEAKERS
Two-way acoustic speaker sys-
tem has 8-inch woofers and can
handle up to 50 watts. Regular
$79.88 each. Save!
6 4 EA.

COMPLETE STEREO
MUSIC SYSTEM
AM/FM stereo. receiver, front-
load cassette player, record
changer, LED tuning indicator,
2 speakers. 8040/415. Reg. $129.
$4

3 TDK ADC-90
CASSETTE TAPES
Pack of 3 90-minute blank
cassette tapes. Comes with
Cassette-O-Matic tape holder.
ADC90PK3. Regular $10.98.
T7 PKF 3

i

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