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November 20, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-20

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 20, 1980-Page 9
Regents to examine
.i holdings

(Continued from Page 1)
vehement student protests than any
other campus issue in the late '70s.
THE WASHTENAW County Coalition
Against Apartheid has protested the
Regents'investments in South Africa on
and off for the past ten years. At the
Regents' March 1979 meeting more
than 200 angry members of the Univer-
sity community staged a protest that
forced the Regents to halt their meeting
and reconvene behind closed doors.
The group has since spoken at every
Regents meeting at which the invest-
ments are discussed and often stages
rallies and sponsors. educational

speakers on campus.
Today, WCCAA member Phil Harper
will be addressing the Regents at their
public comments session. Other mem-
bers of the coalition will also be atten-
ding the meeting today, said WCCAA
member Jenny Patchen, "reminding
the Regents that we're around and a lot
of people are still concerned."
The Regents could review the
University's South African investments
at their meeting today, but discussion
of the University budget is expected to
last all day, and it is unlikely that the
Regents will discuss the Owens-Corning
issue until tomorrow.,

SGNDAY FUNNIES
Q: Why Should You Go See The
Sunday Funnies?
A: Because They're A Madcap, Zany
And Wacky Comedy Troupe Who
Like To Use Cliche'd Adjectives To
Modify their Nouns.
Q: Why Don't They Modify Their Ads?
A: See The Sunday Funnies.
Thurs., Fri., Nov. 20, 21-8 P.M.
Michigan Union Ballroom
$2.00 At The Door
:--- $1.50 At Ticket Central

Former nightclub bouncer
acquitted of assault charge

(Continued from Page 3)
over the place."
"HAISENLEDER IS a person of real
good character," his attorney said. He
said the former bouncer studied in a
monastery to become a priest before at-
tending Eastern Michigan University.
Haisenleder is currently working on
his Ph.D. at Wayne State University,
and plans to "devote his life to cancer
research," Collins said.
While the fight began when DeJonge
was accused of throwing beer mugs,
Collins said no one is sure whether the

accusation was justified. He added that
DeJonge took a polygraph test, which
indicated that he had not thrown the
mugs.
"DeJonge was a nice kid-just
drunk," Collins said.
Another Second Chance bouncer,
Edward Abbott, faces the same
charges as Haisenleder because of a
fight with a patron who allegedly tried
to intercede on DeJonge's behalf. His
trial is scheduled for January.

Daily Photo by DEBBIE LEWIS
ABOUT 50 PROTESTERS march on the Diag yesterday to demonstrate
their opposition to the recent acquittal of four Ku Klux Klansmen and two
Nazi Party members charged with the murder of communist demonstrators
in Greensboro, N.C.
4ni-Klan rally
held on Diag

«4Guilini, of course, is
one of the most highly
regarded, even beloved
conductors on the scene
today. !
Baltimore Sun
Carlo Maria Guilini, Conductor
Los Apeles
PIilTIarrpo1c
Haydn: Symphony No.G94in G major
Copland: Quiet City
Verdi: Overture to "La Forza del destino"
Brahms: Symphony No. 2
Surday Nov 23at 8:30
HMllAuditoriun)
Tickets available at $12.50, $10.50, $9.00, $7.00, $5.00
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Ml 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 (313) 665-3717
Tickets also available at Hill Auditorium
le hours before performance time.
jtIVERSITYcNUSICAL OCIETY
In Its 102nd Year

Ni

By JEFF VCIIGT
About 50 demonstrators, chanting
"jail the killer Klansmen ssembled
in"the Diag yesterday afternoon to
protest Monday's acquittal of defen-
dants tried for the murder of five com-
munists in North Carolina.
The all-white jury found the four Ku
Klux Klansmen and two Nazis innocent
an'the slayings of the communists, who
were gunned down at a "Death to the
Klan" rally last year. The trial was the
longest in North Carolina's history.
"THE ACQUITTAL _ represented a
'license to kill on the part of the KKK,"'
'said Jeff Wallace, a spokesperson for
the Spartacus Youth League, one of the
groups sponsoring the rally.

"No reliance can be placed on the
cops or the courts to deal the the Klan,"
said Matt Prince, who also referred to
the Greensboro verdict as "a travesty
of justice."
University Associate Psychology
Prof. Ray Ezekial, while telling spec-
tators that he "disagrees with most of
the, things (the Spartacus Youth
League) is involved in," strongly con-
demned the recent verdict, adding that
he knew one of the victims.
Th'e demonstrators also printed up a
handful of extra picket signs with anti-
Klan and anti-Nazi slogans and urged
spectators to "pick up a sign and join
the protest."

I-
U

U

POETRY READING,
with
Jacquelin Moore
& Ed Burrows
Reading from their works
Thursday, Nov. 20
7:30 pmY
Admission: free
REFRESHMENTS

NOON LUNCHEON
Homemade Soup & Sandwich 754
Friday, Nov. 21
BRETT EYMAN,
Movement Historian:
"REAGAN, REICH AND
THE NUCLEAR FAMILY"
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(662-5189)

Would
you
help
this kid*?

When the dam broke at Buffalo Creek, West Virginia, a lot of
people weren't as lucky as this little guy.
Jamie and the rest of the Mosley family made it up the hill
just in the nick of time. Seconds later, a wall of water swept all
their earthly possessions away.
Here you see Jamie in the Red Cross shelter, thinking it
all over.
One look at that face, and we're awfully glad we were there
to help.
Every year, you know, Red Cross touches the lives of mil-
lions upon millions of Americans. Rich. Poor. Average. Black.
White. Christian and Jew. With support. With comfort. With
a helping hand when they need it.
So when you open your heart, with your time or your money,
you can be certain it's in the right place.
A Public Service of This Newspaper & The Advertising Council A

MUSIC, DANCE, & SONG
1st Night of Chanukah
I6mda Chassidk fIvd
1980
n
r
TUrDE.27:_P

I

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