100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 1980 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

4

Page 2-Saturday, November 15, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Belgian youths take
bus; poice rescue

IN BRIEF

16 chil
From AP and U
BRUSSELS, Belgiui
shoplifter and two mina
bus at gunpoint yesterd
16 children and their tea(
100 miles to Brussels-, wl
outwitted and overpower
All of the hostages we
said. The hijackers, w
demanding radio time
what police said was a
social justice" to the na
immediately identified.
THE THREE young
deered the bus in the
town of Vielsalm before
ded a group of children
point before police we
teacher climbed aboard
his pupils' fears, authorii
/ Police, who trailed th(
mile trip to Brussels,
along the way collectin
were expecting to be I
eventually 16 students a
18 were aboard.
Trailing far behind
kidnapping spread wer(
and a bus carrying t
parents of Vielsalm, a
people in the Ardennes
German border.
IN BRUSSELS th
beside the Belgian b
ter where the youths
time to express their vi(
tly a protest about uneq
of wealth.
Prime Minister Wil
Cabinet met in emerge
Justice Minister Philip
Internal Affairs Minist
led negotiations at
station.
Two shots were fired
no one was reported hit
course of negotiations
released one young girl
was ill.
STATE PROSECU
Poelman said the yout
with a sawed-off rifle a

dren,teacher
P1 the perpetrators said included an ex-
m -- An ex- plosive." He could not immediately
ors hijacked a confirm whether the box did hold ex-
ay, kidnapped plosives and said later "the whole thing
cher and drove was very amateurish."
here they were After some eight hours aboard the
ed by police. bright orange bus, apparently a deal
rel safe, police was made for them to leave. The gun-
Nho had been toting kidnappers, the students, the
to broadcast male teacher, and the bus driver
n appeal "for walked single file into the radio
ation, were not building and went up to the fourth floor,
authorities said. There, police dressed
men comman- in blue workmen's coveralls, waited.
small eastern Then, witnesses said, things hap-
9 a.m. and her- pened very fast:
aboard at gun- THE LIGHTS switched off and in the
are alerted. A sudden darkness a voice shouted "Get
I, too, to calm out! Run!"
ties said. Children and adults raced as far as
e bus on the 80- they could through the long corridors as
said it stopped far as the third floor.
g children who Police tackled the kidnappers, ap-
picked up, and parently knocking two to the floor, then
ged about 12 to the third.
ONE WITNESS said a single shot was
as word of the heard, but that no one was injured. He
e pickup trucks did not know who fired. "Everyone got
the frightened away safe and sound" an official said.
town of 2,500 The police took all three young men
near the West into custody and identified them as
Michel Stree, 20, Mark Frank, 18, and
e bus parked his brother - believed to be 16 - whom
roadcast cen- they did not name, all from Vielsalm.
demanded air The youths had demanded a chance
ews - apparen- to speak on the French-language
lual distribution station, police said.
One of the three, dressed in black and
fried Martens' appearing to be very young, said, "We
ncy session and are here because some people earn
pe Moureau and a mere 8,000 francs (266) per month
er Guy Mathot whereas ministers (government of-
the broadcast ficials) earn 80,000 francs $2,666."
After the release parents claimed
from the bus but their children quickly and took them
t and during the away, leaving books, half-eaten lunches
the kidnappers and homework aboard the bus.
who apparently Fourteen-year-old Philippe Cornelis,
waiting for his parents, told reporters,
TOR. Francis "I never felt in danger.. . They were
ths were armed rather nice with us. I think they did it
nd a box "which for the publicity."

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Eastern Air Lines lowers
recent fare increase

1I

ONE OF THE three Belgian youths who hijacked a school bus in'Brussels is
led away by police after an eight-hour siege yesterday.,
Iran bombs Iraqi
ol supply targets

From UPI and AP
BAGHDAD - Iran reported a savage
battle yesterday for control of a city
near the oil center of Ahvaz and said its
jet fighters streaked across the border
to bomb oil and supply targets inside
Iraq. Tehran Radio said the focus of the
54-day-old war shifted from the Gulf
port of Abadan on the southern front
inland to Susangerd further north.
Iranian jets raided six Iraqi cities
yesterday and Iraq claimed it shot
down eight of the planes, Iran said its
soldiers "punctured" the month-long
siege of the key Iranian oil refining city
of Abadan.
TEHRAN RADIO said a "fierce bat-
tle" was raging for the city, 30 miles
northwest of the Iranin oil capital of

Ir btp #trUttE,

CHAPEL (Catholic)I
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
~'Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30
a.m. (after 10:30 upstairs and down-
stairs) 12:00 noon, 5:00 p.m. (upstairs
and downstairs).
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter terms).
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m
on Friday only; any other time by
appointment.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday:
Sunday Worship-9:15 and 10:30
a.m. Bible Class-9:15 a.m.
Wednesday:
Handbell Choir-7:30 p.m.
Chapel Choir-8:30 p.m.
Midweek Service-10:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus Ministry Program
Campus Minister-Carl Badger
Worship Services-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
Oratorio; Handel's SAUL-4:00 p.m.
Tuesday-Bible Introduction, 6:30
p.m. Bible Study, 8:00 p.m.
* * *,
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
301 North Ingalls
(two block north of Rackham Graduate
School)
&68-6113
Sunday Service-2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Pastor, Jitsuo Morikawa
10:00 a.m. Morning Wor-
ship-"Christian Parenting."
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School (for all
ages).
"American Baptist Campus
Foundation"
All students and faculty are invited
to attend worship service at 10 a.m. in
the sanctuary and Sunday School
Classes at 11 a.m. in the Guild House.
Theology Discussion Group every
Thursday at 6 p.m.-4
(Complimentary brunch on second
Sunday of each month.)
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10-00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
Sunday Nov. 16-6:00 Holy Com-
,munion followed by meal.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South-Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Sunday:
Christian Education-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
"Time of Meeting"-6:00 p.m.-
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
8015. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday:.
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Tuesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Wednesday-Choir Practice-7:00
p.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S.State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Nov. 16-"The Rainbow
Sign" by Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors: Rose McLean
and Carol Bennington

Ahvaz, with Iraqi troops advancing on
the city from several directions under
cover of heavy artillery fire.
The Iranian news agency Pars said
Iranian planes and helicopters attacked
the Iraqi advance and destroyed "at
least 50 Iraqi tanks and personnel
carriers."
Another Pars dispatch said Ahvaz,
the oil-rich province of Khuzestan, also
was under heavy Iraqi artillery fire.
IT SAID Iranian planes also raided
targets on both sides of the border with
Iraq, including oil storage facilities at
the Iraqi port of Fao and a supply
column near Ahvaz. That attack, the
Iranians claimed, was "vast and suc-
cessful."
Tehran radio also reported fighting
continued further north, on the western
front, where Iranian forces upper hand
on the Gilan Fharb front and had forced
back Iraqi troops in the Sumar region.
Iraq, for its part, reported no new
battlefront news since late Thursday,
when it said it destroyed "two Iranian
navy targets" at the neck of the Shatt
al-Arab waterway.
In another sign that the war was
beginning to hurt Iran on the domestic
front, Tehran Radio reported Prime
Minister Mohammad Ai Rajai met
with Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to
discuss food rationing and meastures
against black marketeering.
Peace Corps
ends Brazil
operations
BRASILIA, Brazil (AP)-The Peace
Corps is quietly closing down
operations in Brazil, rejected by a
government master plan that prefers
high level technical assistance to the
social rehabilitation programs offered
by the American volunteer agency.
All but one of the 24 remaining Peace
Corps volunteers in this South
American nation are scheduled to leave
at the end of their work contracts thi
year and the last worker is to depart
early in 1981.
The Brazilian Foreign Ministry says
that in consultation with the Ministry of
Planning, it has chosen not to approve
new contracts for Peace Corps
programs "because this is not the type
of technical assistance we think is most
important to the nation at this time."
Government officials say there
should be no political connotation at-
tached to the decision, noting that
volunteer programs from France and
West Germany also may be affected by
government priorities.
But U.S. sources say they must con-
clude that either there is a political
reason for rejecting the free help or else
that Brazil-the world's eighth largest
industrial power-thinks there is a
stigma attached to having a program
usually identified with underdevelop-
ment.
"Brazil is having a lot of trouble get-
ting financing from some banks and in-
ternational agencies," said one infor-
med American source, who asked not to
be named. "So, if they're angry, the
Peace Corps happened to be a con-
venient hand to slap."
I
NVo
C>

NEW YORK - Eastern Air Lines yesterday announced a reduction in its
recent fare increases on the California-New York route, after kicking off a
wave of airline ticket price hikes.
American Airlines and United Airlines have said they will match
Eastern's fares. Trans World Airlines, the other large carrier on the route,
has not announced a decision on its fares.
, The least expensive round-trip ticket between Los Angeles and New
York will be $455 on midweek night flights, starting Jan. 1, up from the
current $268 and the low of $198 that prevailed earlier this year when Eastern
started a pricg war on the route. Purchasers will have to buy tickets at least
30 days in advance and stay a week before returning.
'Super gonorrhea' cases
increase in L.A. area
ATLANTA - A major outbreak of penicillin-resistant gonorrhea in the
Los Angeles metropolitan area was reported yesterday by the nationAl Cen-
ter for Disease Control. The agency also announced an increase in cases of
the disease in 6ther major cities.
The CDC said the 149 cases of the so-called "super gonorrhea," which
occurred in Los Angeles County, Calif., between August and mid-October,
was a "sharp increase" compared to the 11 cases reported in the area during.
the past four years. Cases of the strain have also occurred in most states of
the country, with the most recent increases in the Tacoma, Wash. area and
in New York City..
The resistant strain was believed imported into this country by military
personnel returning from the Far East, where "super gonorrhea" is now
epidemic. The CDC said the Los Angeles outbreak was unlike others because
only six per cent of the cases could be traced to infection acquired outside the
U.S.
Ruptured Toyota tanks led to
36 deaths, report says
WASHINGTON - Thirty-six people have burned to death in fires that
erupted when fuel tanks ruptured in Toyota Corollas and Caronas manufac-
tured between 1966 and 1979, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety
reported yesterday.
The agency said there is enough evidence - compiled from police repor-
ts, newspaper clippings, and government files - to warrant a full-scale
government investigation.
A spokesman for the government's National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration said the agency already is analyzing engineering on Toyotas
made between 1969 and 1973. He said the results will determine if an in-
vestigation should be made - a step that could lead to a recall.
A spokesperson for Toyota Motors Sales USA, Inc., in Torrance, Calif.,
said the safety aencv absolved the cars of problems last year.
State agency chair says
lawmakers 'grossly underpaid'
WASHINGTON - The chair of the State Officers Compensation Com-
mission said yesterday lawmakers are "generally underpaid" but other
commissioners are worried about the symbolic impact of raises in the face
of a recession, tight budget, and tax revolt.
But the top 'members'of the Senate and House staffs defended their
bosses' high-ranking salaries and recommended an increase of about 8.4 per
cent.
The seven-member commission, appointed by Gov. William Milliken, is
charged with setting pay for the governor, lieutenant governor, Michigan
Supreme Court justices, and legislators. Its decision, which must be reached
by next month, can be overturned by a two-thirds vote of the legislature,
although such an action is virtually unheard of.
Iran parliament breaks, but
hostage issue still unresolved
WASHINGTON - Iran's parliament began a week-long religious break
yesterday, without considering U.S. proposals on freeing the 52 American
hostages, dimming hopes for any homecoming this year.
But the State Department refused to be discouraged by the continuing
silence. "I'm certainly not ready to use words like setback or disappoin-
tment," said a spokesman. "We are, as of this moment, still awaiting the J
Iranian response or reaction."
California mafia men indicted
Five reputed mafia figures were found guilty yesterday of racketeering
conspiracy, but were acquitted on charges of murder of informer Frank
"Bomp" Bompensiero.
Two of the men were found guilty of extorting money from a por-
nography operation, which was set up by the FBI as a ruse to lure the mob
into exposing its alleged plan to shake down pornographers in the Los
Angeles area.
The jurors implicitly decided that the men were members of the Los
Angeles family of La Cosa Nostra - the first time the federal government
hassever made such an allegation in a federal indictment.
Volume XCI, No. 63
Saturday, November 15, 1980

The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); 13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY: Sports desk: 764-0562: Circulation: 764-0558: Classified advertising:
764-0557; Display advertising: 764-0554: Billing;:764-0550; Composing room: 764-0556.

I

i:,, 1. ,
4

WESLEY FOUNDATION
at the University of Michigan
(313)668-6881
602 E. Huron at State
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

A fellowship, study, and social issues
ministry for the university community.
TOM SCHOMAKER, Chaplain/Di-
rector.
ANNWILKINSON, Office Manager
This week's program:
Sunday: 5:30 Worship
6:00 Shared Meal followed by
Fellowship.
Wednesday-7:30 p.m. Bible Study.
Thursday-7:00 p.m. Peacemakers

4

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

"BUT MOSES STOOD UP AND HELPED THEM" -
Exodus 2:17. Helped those who were being cheated out of
their own rights. Moses was born with a "death penalty"
on his head because of his sex and race: sex, male; race:
Hebrew. Both were determined by his Creator. He had no
choice in the matters at the time of birth, but when he was
grown God gave him the opportunity to choose: "BY
FAITH MOSES, WHEN HE WAS COME TO YEARS,
REFUSED TO BE CALLED THE SON OF PHAROAH'S
DAUGHTER: CHOOSING RATHER TO SUFFER
AFFLICTION WITH THE PEOPLE OF GOD, THAN TO
ENJOY THE PLEASURES OF SIN FOR A SEASON:,
ESTEEMING THE REPROACH OF CHRIST GREATER
RICHES THAN THE TREASURES OF EGYPT: FOR HE
HAD RESPECT UNTO THE RECOMPENSE OF THE

Pharoah wanted his death penalty law to strike down
while a babe, this child was adopted into the royal family,
protected and provided for by the King's power and
provisions, and with his own mother to nurse and raise
him, and teach him about the God of Abraham, Isaac, and
Jacob, and God's exceeding and great promises to them
and their offspring! "EYE HATH NOT SEEN, EAR HATH
NOT HEARD, NEITHER HATH IT ENTERED THE MIND OF
MAN THE THINGS GOD HATH PREPARED FOR THOSE
WHO LOVE HIM!" - 1st Corinthians 2:9.
In this great business God had human help. "FAITH"
produced it! "BY FAITH Moses, when he was born, was
hid three months of his parents - and they were not
afraid fo the King's commandment." - Hebrews 11:23.

4

Editor-in-Chief..................... MARK PARRENT
Managing Editor................... MITCH CANTOR
City Editor... . ............ PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editors. .............. TOMAS MIRGA
BETH ROSENBERG
Features Editor...........,......ADRIENNE LYONS
Opinion Page Editors..............JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
Arts Editors...... .... .......... MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Sports Editor....................ALAN FANGER
NEWS STAFF WRITERS: Arlyn Afremow. Beth Allen.

Business Manager..........ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Soles Manager............ ....KRISTINA PETERSON
Operations Manager............KATHLEEN. CULVER
Co-Display Manager............ .DONNA DRESIN
Co-Display Manager............ROBERT THOMPSON
Classified Manager. ............. SUSAN KLING
Finance Manager. GREGG HADDAD
Nationals Manager. ...... LISA JORDAN
Circulation Manager..........TERRY DEAN REDDING
Sales Coordinator............E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Cathy Boer. Glenn Becker. Joe
Broda. Rondi Cigelnik. Maureen DeLove. Barb

1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan