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November 09, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

Blue blanks Badgers, 24-0

(Continued from Page 1)
But the partisans screamed only
louder, ignoring the pleas of the
Wisconsin players. With all their
timeouts gone, the Badgers were next
assessed a penalty, giving the
Wolverines a first down on the two-yard
line. After yet a second penalty,
Woolfolk zipped untouched around right
end to make the score 17-0 with just
over four minutes remaining in the
period.
"Usually after the first time, players
can settle down their own crowds, but it
didn't work that way," Wangler said.
"We automatic a lot, but you can't run a
play if you can't hear the automatics.
"I told him (the official) my team
couldn't hear. One time he told me to
run it (the play), but I called a signal
and the crowd got louder. I pleaded
with him, and he assessed a penalty."
Schembechler was amazed by the
crowd behavior in that situation. "I've
never heard a crowd that didn't
realize what they were doing to-their
team," he said, shaking his head. "I
can't believe they don't know the
rules."
"JUST THINK what they did to that
team. They gave us a first down and
took away every.timeout they had in the
second half. I sure hope the Michigan
people are smarter than that."
Wisconsin (1-5, 2-7) had dominated
most of the first half, but was unable to
light up the scoreboard. After stopping
the Wolverines' opening drive in three
plays, the Badgers assumed possession
at their own 42 following a 32-yard into-
the-wind punt by Don Bracken.
They quickly hit at the middle of the
Michigan defense for large chunks of
yardage. Tailback John Williams, who
led all runners with a total of 93 yards,
banged left for seven and 14 markers,
respectively, for a first down at the
Michigan 37-yard line. Gerald Green
spotted Williams a short rest by poun-

ding up the middle for a five-yard gain.
Then it was Williams again, up the
middle for two yards and wide right for
six more and another first down at the
Wolverine 24.
BUT THE DRIVE stalled there,
bringing out long field goal specialist
Wendell Gladdem, whose 41-yard at-
tempt sailed wide to the left.
The Badgers picked up a first down
on their next possession, but a patented
Mel Owens blindside blitz caught
freshman quarterback Jess Cole for a
five-yard loss to kill that drive.
Four plays later, though, it was
Wisconsin's ball again, and Williams
runs of four and, eight yards moved the
ball to Michigan's 41. The first quarter
ended at 0-0, an offsides penalty on
Badger left guard Bob Winkler pushing
the ball back to the 46. The Wisconsin
attack stalled there, and David Green-
wood punted 22 yards and out-of-bounds
on the Michigan 17.
BUT THE Wolverines still couldn't
register a first down. Edwards ran
straight ahead for a gain of four and
Ricks slashed right for five, but on
third-and-one, -Ricks was stopped just
short of the first down marker. Bracken
came on and drilled a 66-yard punt to
the Wisconsin 8-yard line, which Tim
Stracka returned to Badger 21.
On the next series, Wisconsin fans
expressed displeasure as coach Dave
McClain conservatively kept the ball on
the ground for three plays and punted
back to the Wolverines. But Wangler
threw incomplete twice on Michigan's
set of downs, and Bracken punted
again.
On first down from his own 25,
Williams high-stepped up the middle
for ten yards. Green followed by bur-
sting up the middle into the Michigan
secondary, where cornerback Brian
Carpenter, the last man for him to beat,
brought him down on the Michigan 42 to
save a touchdown after a gain of 23.

Three plays later, however, Greenwood
was forced to punt.
ON MICHIGAN'S first play, Edwards
busted through the line for 14 yards,
and incredibly, the Wolverines' initial
first down of the game with 7:31
remaining in the half. The Blue offense
was unable to move further, and
Bracken booted a 53-yarder to the
Wisconsin 26-yard line. Tim Stracka
fielded the kick, but was upended by
Michigan's Tom Dixon and coughed the
ball up, Rich Strienger recovering for
the Wolverines on the 24.
Michigan moved to the six, but
Wangler overthrew an open Anthony
Carter on third down. Ali Haji-Sheikh
connected on a 23-yard chip shot with
2:33 left in the opening half to put
Michigan on top, 3-0.
The Michigan defense, which recor-
ded its second straight shutout,
tightened up and forced the Badgers to
kick it away for the fifth time in the half
with 1:10 left. Greenwood's shank punt
of 16 yards gave Wangler & Co. the ball
at the Wisconsin 42.
THE SENIOR quarterback took im-
mediate advantage of the opportunity
by connecting with Alan Mitchell for 24

yards. He folowed by hitting Edwards
in the right flat for nine more and, two
plays later, found Carter in the back of
the end zone for a four-yarder to give
Michigan its halftime margin.
That catch was Carter's lone recep-
tion of the day, and the sophomore sen-
sation (who also fumbled a punt in the
first period) completed his worst day of
the '80 campaign on the bench with a
sprained ankle.
Wangler wasn't discouraged by the
play of his favorite receiver, nor by that
of the offense as a whole. "It was more
or less a zone coverage, and they just
covered the areas where Anthony
usually goes," explained Wangler, who
finished the day 8 for 14 for 82 yards.
"We made a few mistakes, but you
have to credit a lot of that to Wisconsin.
They have an excellent defense. Per-
sonally, I threw a few bad passes. into
the wind."
With the game in hand, Michigan con-
trolled the final quarter, as Wisconsin
never advanced past the Wolverine 40.
Michigan's final drive (a 19-play, 80-
yarder) took up a full nine minutes,
with a one-yard Edwards plunge ser-
ving as the capper.

Ar Pnoto
[CHIGAN TAILBACK Lawrence Ricks is upended by a host of Wisconsin
cklers in the second half of yesterday's Big Ten contest in Madison. The
olverine ground game averaged less than four yards per carry and was out-
med by the feeble Badger offense, but a solid defensive effort held Wisconsin
bay throughout the afternoon as the Maize and Blue registered their second
utout in as many weeks, 24-0.

OTTER SHOW IN STANDS:
W'fans badger team's success

.u.

create their own excitement, because
Wisconsin has provided its fans with
few thrills on the gridiron in recent
years. In the last decade, Wisconsin
football teams have managed more
than a five-win season just once.
"We can't stop them," said Brian
Goluach, a university police officer, in
reference to the rowdiness. "We just
try to keep them under control."
Goluach said his main job is to
prevent body passing and to stop people
from throwing bottles over the top of
the stadium. He added that in the past,
people have been seriously injured by
bottles that were thrown from there.
The Animal Section appeared fairly
calms during the first half, and rooted
on their Badgers while the game
remained scoreless. But when
Michigan put ten quick -points on the
scoreboard, they seemed to lose in-
terest in the contest.
That's when the rowdies went into
their act..
Cup wars were very popular. And the
cups weren't always empty-many
were filled with beer, water, ice, or
other assorted liquids.
Stroking was another popular event.

A large mass of students swayed for-
ward, then backward, pretending to be
the rowing team, and thus created an
interesting visual effect.
In an act of collective pun production,
they reached into their pockets prior to
the start of an important play, hauled
out their keys, and tingled them,
signifying a "key" play.
Most of their actions were harmless,
but on one occasion yesterday their
behavior was actually harmful to the
Wisconsin team.
Cn a fourth and one at the Badger
three, quarterback John Wangler tur-
ned to the referee, claiming that the
wild screams emanating from the
Animal Section impaired the ability of
the offensive unit to hear his signals.
The official, in accordance with con-
ference rules, charged Wisconsin with
three successive timeouts when the
crowd would not quiet down on the
same number of attempts to get the
play off. The noise level continued to in-
crease until he finally penalized the
Badger defense for delay of game. It
gave the Wolverines a first down at the
one, and enabled them to score easily
on the following play.

=1 Grandstand
KV ew By Stan Bradbury
View
The times may change .. .
..but Badger failure endures
MADISON
The Michigan-Wisconsin rivalry just won't be the same with Ronald
Reagan as president. By next fall, Jimmy Carter will be out of office, and
that could spell the end of an era. During Carter's four years of tenure,
Michigan has beaten Wisconsin four times by a combined score of 176-0.
Yes, that's right. Wisconsin has failed to score on the Wolverines in four
years. The headlines could read: The Wisconsin Crisis-Badgers Held
Scoreless, Day 1461.
What's worse is that you have to go all the way back to the days when John
F. Kennedy was in the Oval Office to find the last time Wisconsin has beaten
Michigan-1963.
That means Wisconsin is a big 0-for-Johnson-Nixon-Ford and Carter, 14
games in all. In a way, the Badger football program, when considering
Michigan, has an empty feeling for 17 years of its history. It is missing the
Beatles, the American ground troop involvement in Viet Nam, and the entire
decade of the 70's, among other things.
Most of the players out there on the field at Camp Randall Stadium yester-
day were three or four years old when Wisconsin last sent Michigan down to
defeat on the gridiron. At that time they were more concerned that Mommy,
not the team plane, didn't leave them behind.
But more important for Michigan is the present and not the past, as the
Wolverines' play yesterday continued to impress a lot of people. On defense,
the Wolverines have now recorded ten straight scoreless quarters which
date back to the second period of the Illinois game.
The Michigan offense also managed to put up 24 points against a tough.
Badger defense, which is one of the tops in the conference. Only UCLA and
Brigham Young have scored more points on Wisconsin and no other Big Ten
team, including Purdue and Ohio State, has done better.
Anywhere but New Jersey
All this may have coach Bo Schembechler whistling Dixie, or maybe even
'California, Here I Come.' If Michigan fails to grab the roses, there are plen-
ty of other bowls which are interested in the Wolverines.
One of the most interested bowls was the two-year-old Garden State Bowl,
which plays out of the Meadowlands in New Jersey. The Garden State Bowl
was willing to give Michigan BIG bucks until they got the BIG no from
Athletic Director Don Canham last week.
"We wouldn't be interested in the Garden State Bowl," said Canham. "It's
too early (December 22) and we're not that interested in playing in New Jer-
sey.
"We want to play after Christmas because we have exams. That kicks out
a helluva lot of bowl games for us," Canham said.
Still hotly pursuing Michigan and all the fans, recognition, and money that
go with it are the Fiesta, Bluebonnet, and Liberty Bowls, just to name a few.
Canham said, "We really won't know a lot about the bowl picture until af-
ter the Purdue game. Then, at about 6 p.m., we'll see what happens. Right
now, it's just too early to tell."
The bowl picture is much clearer for Wisconsin. Sporting a 2-7 record, the
Badgers will only be in one bowl this season-the Toilet Bowl, when they
play at Northwestern next weekend.
Badger fans cannot be pleased with the progress which coach Dave Mc-
Clain has made at Wisconsin. Since McClain took over in 1978, things have
gone from mediocre to worse, with this season approaching the pits.
Wisconsin has been shut out four times this season and the Badgers now
claim last in the conference in total offense.
"We have to keep hanging together and working. I can understand the
fans," said McClain. "It's been a long dry spell here at Wisconsin."
So lengthy, in fact, most fans can't help but forget before the drought
began.

4

I

4

4

q

Bumbling Badgers

MICH.
First downs ....................... 18
Rushing (att/yds).................56/178
Passing (comp/att/int) ............ 8/14/0
Passing yards ..................... 82
Fumbles (no/lost) ................. 2/0
Punts (no/avg) .................... 7/45.0
SCORING

WIS.,
11
44/180
4/11/0
43
1/1
8/31.0

WISCONSIN
Williams ........................

16

93 5.8

MICHIGAN ................. 0 10 7 7-24
Wisconsin ................. 0 0 0 0-0
SCORING PLAYS
M-Haji-Sheikh, 23-yd. FG
M-Carter 4 pass from wangler (Haji-Sheikh kick)
M-Wooifolk 1 run (Haji-Sheikh kick)
M-Edwards 1 run (Haji-Sheikh kick)
RUSHING
MICHIGN

Green ........................... 7
Mohapp ......................... 8
King.......................... 4
Cole .................. 8
McFadden..................... 1
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att comp
Wangler.................. 14 8
WISCONSIN
Cole ....................... 11 4.....
Cole ....................... 11 4
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN

35
31
17
2
2
int
0
0
yds
39
13
15
11
4
28
13
2

5.0
3.9
4.3
0.3
2.0
yds
82
43
TD
0
0,
0
0
0
0
0

I

WITH PASSING whiz Mark Herrmann directing the offense, Purdue doesn't
feel the urge to run the ball too often. Occasionally, however, the Boiler-
makers stick to the ground. Here Jim Smith, aided by fullback John Macon
(37), slips past Iowa defensive end Andre Tippett during'second-quarter ac-
tion yesterday. Purude thrashed the visiting Hawkeyes, 58-13, to remain tied
with Michigan and Ohio State for first place in theBig Ten.

Edwards ........................
Ricks ...........................
Woolfoiok........................
Carter...... ...............
S. Smith ........................
K. Smith.....................
Ingram....................
Wangler .........................

att
23
15
10
1
1
1
1
4

yds
83
49
32
6
5
3
3
.3

avg
3.6
3.3
3.2
6.0
5.0
3.0
3.0
-0.7

Mitchell .........................
Edwards ........................
Brockington .....................
Betts ............................
Carter......................
WISCONSIN
Stracka ........................
McFadden ......................
Williams ........................

no.
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1

A

BIG TEN ROUNDUP:

4 Smith TDs
came throu
By RON POLLACK Leister com
scialtothe DaIly yards to Dar
EAST LANSING-When Northwestern ded the gam
encountered Michigan State yesterday, it was the third qua
expected that the two teams' performance would Smith, fiti
be indicative of their respective 0-9 and 1-7 the schools
records. fourth quar
Instead, the crowd of 60,157 Spartan partisans plays for no1
witnessed' a stellar performance by senior After his i
tailback Steve Smith as MSU routed North- head coach
western, 42-10. contest was
SMITH, WHO HAD carried the ball only 94 "There wasc
times for 386 yards in the previous eight games, we all felt. I

give M
ugh the air, as quarterback John
npleted scoring strikes of 27 and 32
ryl Turner and Otis Grant. Smith en-
me's scoring with a nine-yard run in
arter.
tingly enough, had a chance to break
scoring record miidway through the
ter but was stopped on consecutive
gain at the Wildcat one.
first Big Ten victory, Michigan State
i[uddy Waters admitted that this
one that his team needed to win.
certainly an amount of pressure that
t meant we would be in the basement

SU 1st Big Ten win

Big Ten
Standings

State.
Herrmann played only the first three quarters
as Purdue built a commanding 51-7 lead. One of
his touchdown passes, a 43-yarderlate in the
second quarter, was to tight end Dave Young,
whose eight catches for 143 yards pushed his
career total to a conference record 163 recep-
tions.
The Boilermakers, 6-0 in the Big Ten and 7-2
overall, held a 23-7 halftime advantage and then
put the game away with four touchdowns in the
last six minutes of the third quarter. Herrmann
completed 5 of 7 passes for 90 yards on the first
drive to set up a 1-yard score by tailback Jimmy

MINNESOTA, PLAYING without injured run-
ning back Marion Barber, rallied behind White,
a senior fullback, who scored on runs of 36 and 28
yards.
White gave the Gophers a 7-0 lead in the first
quarter when he broke a tackle and raced down
the left sidelines for a touchdown.
Minnesota increased its lead to 14-0 midway
through the second quarter on a 61-yard bomb
from quarterback Tim Salem to flanker Chester
Cooper.
Ohio State 49, Illinois 42
COLUMBUS (AP)-Seventh-ranked Ohio

Conference
W L

Ohio State......
MICHIGAN .....
Purdue ..........
Minnesota .......
Iowa ............
Illinois.......
Indiana.......
Michigan State ..
Wisconsin.....
North wesitern ...

6
6
6
4
3
3
2
1
1)

0
0
0
3
3
4
4
5
5

Overall
W L'
8 1 '0
7 2 0
7 2 0
5 4 0.
3 6 {0
3 6 1
5 4 =0
2 70
0 810

I

i

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