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November 07, 1980 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-07

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 7, 1980-Page 3
RESEARCHER LECTURES ON DANISH STUDY
Mental illness, heredity lnked

I

The Graduate School of Business Administration
at the
University of Southern Californis
will be on campus
November 10, 9:00-3:00
Graduate programs available include:
MBA, MBT, MACC, MSOB, MSMSC, JD/MBA, JD /MBT
For schedule information, please contact
CAREER PLANNING and PLACEMENT

By MARK SCHUMACK
The correlation between mental
illness and heredity has been reinforced
by recent studies in Denmark, Harvard
Medical School Psychiatry Prof.
Seymour Kety explained yesterday.
The reknowned researcher showed
an audience of 300 gathered in the
Rackham Amphitheater evidence that
schizophrenic adopted adults were
more likely to have biological relatives
who are mentally ill, than were adopted
adults who did not have schizophrenia.
KETY SAID adopted persons were
used as the subjects in the study to
separate environmental and hereditary
factors. Previous studies involving
mentally ill twins had not determined
whether the mental illness was a result
of inherited genes or the kind of en-
vironment the twins grew up in.
The Denmark results lend credibility
to the theory that some types of mental
illness are hereditary, said Kety, since
the adopted children grew up apart
from their natural parents. The study
was done in Denmark because the

Danish government keeps extensive
records of both natural and adopted
parents of adopted children.
Kety, who is a former director of the
National Institute of Mental Health,
also talked about recent developments
in the field of neuroscience, a field
which could lead to "an ultimate under-
standing of the brain." He said that
although the brain's composition is
"sheer complexity," new research into
its chemical behavior is substantially
increasing scientists' understanding of
that complexity.
Kety, 65, is currently director of the
Mailman Research Center
Laboratories for Psychiatric Research
at McLean Hospital. He has contributed
hundreds of articles to journals and
received many awards in the field of
mental health.
Kety was the third guest speaker in
the, continuing presidential lecture
series, which is honoring the
inauguration of University President
Harold Shapiro.

Ie.-,;

HAVE DINNER WITH
ClareyTHIS WEEK.
A bowl of chili, a slice of corn-
bread & house beverage for
$1,50
Special is from 6-8 pm, M-F
Good TimeCharley
1140 South University-668.8411.

Daily Photo by LISA KLAUSNER
RESEARCHER SEYMOUR KETY discusses a study linking mental illness
to heredity at Rackahm Amphitheater. Kety, a professor of psychiatry at
Harvard Medical School, lectured yesterday to an audience of 300.
HAPPENINGS
FILMS
AAFC-Bringing Up Baby, 7, 10:20 p.m., 'wentieth Century, 8:40 p.m.,
MLB 3.
Alt. Action Films-Adam's Rib, 7 p.m., You Can't Take It With You, 9
p.m., MLJB 4.
Cinema Guild-McCabe and Mrs. Miller, 7, 9:15 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II-The Pirate, 7 p.m., Captain Blood, Nat. Sci. Aud.
Gargoyle Films-Wedding in Blood, 7, 9 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall, Law
Quadrangle.
Mediatrics-Tom Jones, 7, 9:30 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
A-V Services-Eat, Drink, and Be Wary, Food Follies, 12:10 p.m.,
SPH II Aud.
SPEAKERS
Arch. and Urban Planning-Henry Kowalwski, brown bag lunch, noon,
2104 Art and Arch. Building.
Guild House-Virginia Nordby, "The University and Affirmative Ac-
tion," luncheon lecture, noon, 802 Monroe.
RPM-John Sobetzer, "The Differences Between Management Fun-
ctions and Regulatory Functions of Resource Policy Managers," bag lunch
seminar, noon, 2032 Dana.
S. and S.E. Asian Studies-Satish Arora, "The Contemporary Indian
Political Scene," bag lunch lecture, noon, Lane Hall Commons.
MHRI-Antonio Giuditta, "RNA Synthesis in Rabbit Cerebral Cortes," 2
p.m., 1057 MHRI.
Bio. Tech.-N. Wesseling, "The Use of Genetics in Industries," 3 p.n.,
104 Engin.1A.
CRLT George Williams, "Using Films, Slides, and Other Media,"
seminar on college teaching, 3:10p.m., Michigan Media:
Chemistry-Fernando Grandjean, "Mixed Valence Spinels Studied by
Mossbauer Spectroscopy," 3:30 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Philosophy-Gilbert Harman, "Does Logic Have Anything To Do With
Reasoning?," 4:10p.m., MLB 1.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Christina Makara, harpsichord rectial, 7:30 p.m.,
Rackham Assembly Hall.
School of Music-Dianna Penning, Manfred Dreilich, an evening of
popular music, 8 p.m., Stearns.
Eclipse Jazz-Philip Glass and George Calioppo, concert, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Aud.
Newman Club-"Godspell," 8 p.m., St. Mary's Chapel, William at Thom-
pson.
Stage Co.-"Papp,"8 p.m., Canterbury Loft.
Dept. of Theatre, Showcase Series-"Table Manners," 8 p.m., Trueblood
Theatre.
UAC Musket-"Anthing Goes,"8 p.m., Power Center.
ARK-Michael Cooney, folksinger/instrumentalist, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Young People's Theater-"Beans", 4:30, 7 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
MEETINGS
Botticelli Game Players-meeting, noon, Pan Tree.
University Duplicate Bridge Club-game, 7:30 p.m., Henderson Room,
Mich. League.
Dickens Fellowship-meeting, Bill Marcoux, "Dickens and Education," 8
p.m., Pendelton Room, Mich. Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rec. Sports-International Rec. Program, 7 p.m., Coliseum.
Int. Student Fellowship-Dinner and disc., for transp. call 994-4669, 6:30
p.m., 4100 Nixon.
Hillel-Meekreh Shabbat Dinner, 5:30 p.m., Markley Concourse Lounge.
Hillel-Shabbat Services, Cons. and Orth., 5 p.m.; Ref., 8 p.m.; dinner at
6:30 p.m., 1421 Hill St.
Council for Exceptional Children-"Kids on the Block," a workshop on
mainstreaming in public schools through puppetry, 10 a.m., third floor,
School of Education.
Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library-Book Sale, 5:30 p.m., Ann Arbor
Public Library.
Student Leadership Services-Assertiveness Training and Leadership
Fundamentals Workshops, 6:30 p.m., Howard Johnson's Motor Lodge.
School of Public Health-Registration for conference on Ethics,
Humamsm, and Medicine.
Mabel Todd Body Alignment and Release Technique-John Rolland, per-
formance of solo works, 8 p.m., Dance Theatre II studio.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan, Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109.

'U' students design
individualized majors
By LINDA RUECKERT

One of Myra Klayman's favorite
pasttimes was drawing scientific
illustrations and diagrams; she even
wanted to study the subject in college.
But the University doesn't offer a con-
centration in scientific illustration, so
Klayman designed her own.
Klayman, a University senior, is one
of approximately 40 students who com-
plete an individual concentration each
year. The individual concentration
program allows students to major in
nearly any subject that interests them,
but is not offered as a concentration.
"SOME PEOPLE think ICPs are too
broad, but really they're more
specialized," said Karil Kochenderfer,
a consumer research and com-
munications major. "Many other
universities offer it (the major) as a
concentration, but I wanted to stay
here, so I decided on an individual con-
centration."
Liina Wallin, who has been the in-
dividual concentration counselor for
the past four years, said that while in-
dividual programs are generally not
more difficult than regular concen-
trations, designing them requires
creativity and innovation.
Individual concentrations range from
the more ordinary majors such as ur-
ban studies, to the more unconven-
tional, such as metapsychology or
human rights. If a concentration is con-
sistently selected by students, it even-
tually may be made into an established
major. This is how the women's studies
concentration evolved.
MARGOT MORROW, the counselor
for the twelve to fifteen ICP Honors
students per year, also said the Honors
program is similar to that of the
regular LSA plan, except that students
must write an honors thesis.
Kochenderfer, too, emphasized that
ICP students must contend with a
variety of myths surrounding the
program.
"Some people seem to think that ICP
students are just looking for an easy
major, but others admire us for our in-
dividuality," Kochenderfer said. "I've
been to a few job interviews and all of
S. Quad trash
cans burn;
Diag lights out
The four fire trucks outside South
Quad last night did nothing morethan
check out a burning trash can on the
eighth floor of the dormitory. A Campus
Security officer said they were called at
10:11 p.m. and everything was cleared
at 10:17. "We (Campus Security) were
great," he explained.
Meanwhile, Diag lights are out again
and Detroit Edison has been called,
Campus Security officer Burns said. He
added that Security was patrolling as
heavily as possible and offering more
rides than usual but he would not com-
ment on how many additional officers
were on patrol.

the employers seem very interested in
the program."
BUT JUNIOR Sue Brown, who is
majoring in labor and industrial
relations, said she found her concen-,
tration difficult to organize because it
was so unusual. "There wasn't very
much help in deciding the kinds of
classes I should take," she said. "But
once I got everything settled I really
liked it. I didn't have to take classes
that I didn't want, just to satisfy depar-
tmental requirements. I could spread
my courses out over a variety of
areas."
To apply to the program, students
must identify their major, and draw up
a list of upper level courses pertaining
to the particular field of study. Ap-
plications are reviewed by the ICP
Committee, which consists of Wallin
and three faculty members.
Few students' requests for admittan-
ce into the program are denied. For
example, this year only, two ap-
plications were turned down.
It's
DICK SIEGEL
5 THE MINISTERS
OF MELODY
at
1140 South University
668-8411

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December 31.1980

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-__ 1_- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I

511': Campus Rooteiy
3rd Anniversaiy Sale
Big Bargains on Entire
Stock of Men's and
Women's Boots,.. Shoes
a'nd Clogs

,

CUSTOM JEWELRY DESIGN
6ND MOUNTING SHOW
Our Designer and Goldsmith will be in the store one day only, Saturday, Nov. 8 from
10 to 4. He will be showing an exciting collection of hand made gold jewelry styles available
for immediate delivery or Christmas Layaway at special low prices. Many of the styles can
be adapted as mountings for your stones. Our designer can also offer the help you need to
interpret your thoughts onto paper and finally into a workable concept as beautiful jewelry.
He will also make a variety of suggestions to achieve a design that is pleasing to your contem-
porary or traditional taste.

I I

10%~i

to 40%O

I

off entire stock

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