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November 06, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-06

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-Page 2-Thursday, November 6, 1980-The Michigan Daily
MSA TO RELEASE RESULTS IN 3 WEEKS
Course evaluations finished

IN BRIEF

Compiled from Associated Prs and
United Pres. International reports

By ANN MARIE FAZIO
The results of MSA course evalua-
tions, completed by 7,500 LSA students
-at registration last April, will be
'available to students by the third week
"of November, according to Jim Lin-
dsay, LSA Student Government vice-
president and MSA coordinator for
-course evaluations.
The evaluations will be printed in an
=80-page booklet similar to the time
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor
SHLOMO DESHEN-noted
Isaeli anthiopotist will speak on
MUSLIM-JEWISH RELATIONS IN
TRADITIONAL MOROCCO. AND
JEWISH COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
at 3pm. Mon., Nov.10
sponsored by the Program in Judalc Studies, and
the Center for N. Est N, African Studies
SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND POLITICS
IN ISRAELI TOWNS at Spm, Mon..
" Nov.10
sponsored by the Program in Judac Studies.
and the Hillef Foundation
Beth lectures will be held
in the East Lecture Hall,
Third floor, Rockham Building

schedule and will be distributed free
along with several other publications at
1210 Angell Hall.
THE MAIN GOALS of the
evaulations, Lindsay said, are to in-
form the students about the classes
they are about to select and "to make
the quality of teaching at Michigan an
issue on campus." Lindsay said the
evaluations reflect the results of objec-
tive questions (rated preference) in the
areas of the course material, and the
teaching, testing, and grading
techniques of faculty members.
MSA auditor Ken Tedford said the
evaluation program, including printing
and processing costs, amounted to
more than $10,000, which was collected
over the last two years.,

Since 1978, students have been paying
15 cents per term to fund an MSA-
sponsored course evaluation program.
The money, which has been under the
jurisdiction of MSA's Academic Affairs
Committee, was never used until this
year because the committee could not
agree on a feasible evaluation plan to
present to the full assembly.
FINALLY, IN January, Lindsay,
MSA President Marc Breakstone, and
members of the LSA-SG Curriculum
Action Committee got together with
Academic Affairs members to come up
with the current plan.
Along with the course evaluations,
the booklet will also include a list of
other evaluations available on campus,
as well as information on how to get
them.
"Hopefully, this will raise the con-
sciousness of all students that there are

lots of ways to gain information about
your classes," Lindsay said.
The student Counseling Office has
had evaluations for at least eight years,
according to Dave Friedman, one of the
office's four coordinators. He added
that the office's evaluations are easy-
oriented and on a smaller scale than the
MSA evaluations.
"We have a much smaller par-
ticipation in the evaluation process,"
Friedman said, adding that the Student
Counseling Office program "doesn't
cover nearly the number of courses as
the MSA evaluations cover."
In the next two months the MSA
program may be expanded from only
LSA courses to those in all schools and
colleges, Lindsay said. He said plans
have already been made for the
evualtion forms to be handed out once
again at registration in December.

60

i1

PITCHER'
NIGHT.
ti Cti
1140 South University
668-8411

Stock prices soar in
wake of Reagan win

Human, Rights at the University:
FOCUS ON GAY ISSUES
AND LIFESTYLES
FORMERLY CALLED "DORM RAPS"
NORTH CAMPUS AREA
Thursday, NOV.,1980-7-10pm, Bursley Hall
CENTRAL AREA
Thursday,. NOV.13,1980-7-10pm, Law Club Lounge
THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IS INVITED TO ATTEND
This event is sponsored by: The Human Sexuality Office ("Gay/Lesbian
Advocates"), Counseling Services, University of Michigan.
For More Information, Call 763-4186 or 743-4187
AFRICA WEEK
THURSDAY, November 6-
MOVIES AND DISCUSSION
"Ancient Africans" (27 min)
"Six Days In Soweto" (55 min)
7:30 pm-3rd floor, Henderson Room, Michigan League
Light Refreshments Served
FRIDAY, November 7-
INTERNATIONAL DINNER
Responding to Crises of the 80's; Focus on U.S.-Africa
Relatiops. Reservations Needed
Call 662-5529 for more information
SATURDAY, November 8-
Theme: "Africa In The Next Decade"
LECTURES:1
(I) EDUCATION & LITERATURE
IN AFRICA Prof. Lemuel Johnson
(11) EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY IN AFRICA
Dr. Ike Oyeka
(1II) SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY FOR AFRICAN
DEVELOPMENT Dr. David Wiley.
10:00am-12:30pm-3rd floor, Henderson Room,
Michigan League
Light Refreshment Served
AFRICA WEEK PARTY.
9:00pm-2:00 am Trotter House,
1443 Was tenaw
SPONSORED BY ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTRE

NEW YORK (AP)-Stock prices
surged upward on record trading
volume yesterday as' Wall Street
responded to the election victory of
Ronald Reagan and the Republicans'
big gains in Congress.
The same euphoria was evident in the
foreign exchange markets, where the
dollar surged to seven-month highs
against most leading European curren-
cies.
BUT THE excitement began to die
down by late afternoon at the New York
Stock Exchange, and computer
problems at' the exchange illustrated
the difficulty Wall Street had in coping
with the surge in trading.
The Dow Jones average of 30 in-
dustrials, up more than 27 points at its
mid-day high, closed with a 15.96 gain
at 953.16.
Volume on the Big Board soared to
84.08 million shares, beating the old
record of 81.62 million total recorded on
Oct. 10 of last year.
The overwhelming preference for
Reagan over President Carter in the

financial community had been adver-
tised for months.
"THE STOCK market is historically
a Republican animal, and Reagan
represents a true conservative
Republican," the brokerage firm of
Bache Halsey Stuart Shields said in a
wire transmitted to all its branch of-
fices this week.
But even as the market was soaring
early in the day, brokers were cautious
about how long the frenzied buying
might last. They pointed out that the
market will 'have to cope with some
harsh news in the immediate future.
FURTHER increases in interest
rates such as the bank prime lending
rate are expected any day now, and in-
flation is expected to pick up new
momentum in the next few months,
regardless of what actions the gover-
nment takes.
Stocks of the major defense contrac-
tors were especially strong in expec-
tation of greater emphasis on military
spending by a Reagan administration.

Victory stuns
'U' profs
(Continued from Page 1)
does not think the U.S. is in for a big
change.
Whiting explained that Salt II already
was killed before Afghanistan and that
Carter never really pushed it. The anti-
Soviet feelings that Reagan has will
strengthen our reactions with China.
Whiting said that the biggest question
to ask is whether Reagan will rely
heavily on the Secretary of State or his
head of National Security. Whiting
predicts he will rely on the Secretary of
State.
French troops from Montreal cap-
tured the British fort at the confluence
of the Ohio and Alleghany rivers in 1754
and named it Fort Duquesne. It was
recaptured by the British in 1758 and
renamed Fort Pitt in honor of the
British prime minister. The city of Pit-
tsburgh, Pa., now stands on the site.
UNISEX
Long or Short Haircuts
by Professionals at ...
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State.........68.9329
East U. at South U...%462-0354
Arborland.............971-9975
Maple village .......... 761-2733

Prof 'may
get key
GOP slot
(Continued from Page 1)
politically stable enough for the U.S.
around which to build a regional
security system.
"You can't have regional security
without - domestic stability," Tanter
said.
When he returns to the University,
Tanter said, he will be a better teacher
as a result of experiences outside his
research.
"I'VE TRAVELED with Gov.
Reagan and briefed him throughout his
campaign," Tanter said. "I've talked
with Reagan, Kissinger, and Hague,
and I'm a much better scholar and,
hence, teacher now."
Tanter said that ahe would be retur-
ning toethe University in January,
unless he is given an appointment. "I
would serve wherever the president
wanted me to serve," he said.
Right now, people are .being appoin-
ted to the transition teams that will
work with the Carter administration
until Reagan assumes office. It is
possible that Tanter could be among
those considered for the position of
Mideast specialist on Reagan's tran-
sition team, he said.

GOP gains governorships
WASHINGTON-Republicans claimed two more governorships yes-
terday as the last ballots were tallied in Arkansas and North Dakota,
boosting the GOP to a net gain of four in the 1980 election.
Of the 13 contests at stake, Republicans won in the three states they
already held while the Democrats retained only six of the 10 posts under
their control.
The new results put the GOP's count at 23 governors, the party's highest.
concentration in a decade.
Illinois juvenile ase
sent to appeals court
CHICAGO-A Circuit Court hearing to determine whether a 13-year-old
boy should stay in this country or return to the Soviet Union against his
wishes ended abruptly yesterday when the trial judge sent the case to an ap-
peals court.
Attorneys for the parents of Walter Polovchak, the Ukranian youth who
had sought political asylum, asked for the appeal because the case had not
been settled within the required 90 days.
An Illinois Supreme Court ruling provides for the right of appeal in
juvenile cases in which there is no final order within 90 days of the first
hearing. The first hearing in the Polovchak case was in July.
The boy's attorney, Julian Kulas, argued against sending the case to the
Illinois Appellate Court.
Pope clar'ifies comments
VATICAN CITY-Pope John Paul II further explained the Roman
Catholic Church's complex view of human sexuality yesterday, calling lust
sinful but saying that eroticism or sexual arousal can be ethical.
The pope's remarks before some 7,000 visitors in the Vatican's ultra
modern audience hall were the latest in a year-long series of addresses he
has delivered on human sexuality.
"In speaking about a lustful look, Christ was indeed speaking about a"
sphere of phenomena that are commonly referred to as erotic," the 60-year
old pope said. "But not all eros falls under Christ's condemnastion of con
cupiscence (lust)."
State test scores drop
LANSING-Average scores of Michigan students taking national college
entrance examinations during the 1979-80 school year dropped slightly, the
State Board of Education said yesterday.
The board said the slight decrease in scores reflected a trend which star-
ted several years ago. However, Michigan student scores on both the
American College Test-known as the ACT-and the Scholastic Aptitude
Test-the SAT-were higher than the national average.
Tugboat sinks, creates
four-mile oil slick
TRAVERSE CITY-The 98-foot tugboat Lauren Castle collided with a
disabled oil tanker and sank almost immediately yesterday, creating a four-
mile oil slick on the west arm of the Grand Traverse Bay.
The Coast Guard rescued three crewmen aboard the tugboat, but a four-
th was reported missing and a search was under way. He was identified as
Bill Stephan, 51.
Coast Guard Commander Tom McCarthy said the tugboat sank in 392
feet of water after it struck the 40Q-foot Amoco Wisconsin at 1:30 a.m. near
Lee's Point in the bay's west arm about seven miles north of Traverse City.
Distinct features visible
in Saturnian atmosphere
PASADENA-As Voyager One moves closer toward its Nov. 12 fly-by
of Saturn more atmospheric features are coming into focus, and a Jet
Propulsion Laboratory scientist said yesterday that was "very comforting."
Imaging Team Leader Brad Smith said last year's Pioneer spacecraft
fly-by of the ringed planet failed to show distinctive features in Saturn's at-
mosphere.
But as early as August, he said, Voyager One, which was taking pictures
for engineering purposes began to see "discrete features" in the Saturnian
atmosphere.

Volume XCI, No.55
Thursday, November 6,1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings duringthe
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press international,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspaper Syndicate.
News room: )313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY; Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising:
764.0557; Display advertising: 764.0554; Billing: 764.0550; Composing room: 764.0556.

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THE OTHER FACE OF JASONS

215 S. STATE
663-7403

4

MENU
SOUPS:
A. Tofu-Miso Soup..............72c
Light Broth With Tofu & Miso
B. Wakame-Miso Soup.......72°
Light Broth With Sea Weed
1.R TANIN DONBURI ...................................... $1.92
Beef, onions, eggs, RICE
2.R OYAKO DONBURI........................................ $1.92
Chicken, onions, eggs, RICE
3. IRIDAMA DONBURI......... ............$1.92
Bamboo shoots, water chestnuts, white &
green onions, to fu, shirataki, eggs, RICE
4.R KATSUDONBURI .......................81.92
Fried veal cutlet, onions, eggs, RICE
5.R TEMPURA DONBURI ..................................$1.92
fried vegetables in light batter,
shrimp, eggs, RICE
6. TONKATSU...................................................$1.92
Fried veal cutlet with shredded cabbage & sauce
7. CHICKEN TERIYAKI...................................$81.92
Broiled breast of chicken, marinated, sauce, RICE
8. KUSHIKATSU...........................................$1.92
Skewered and breaded fried beef with onions
cabbage & sauce
9. SUKIYAKI-BEEF.......................................... $1.92
White & green onions, Japanese vegetables in
sukiyaki sauce with beef & RICE'S
10. SUKIYAKI-CHICKEN....................................$1.92
As above with chicken, RICE

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plus $30
rn..:ctrIO lull l

,r.9wlo

Editor-in-Chief..................... MARK PARRENT
Managing Editor................... MITCH CANTOR
City Editor.......................PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editor...................TOMAS MIRGA
Features Editor..................BETH ROSENBERG.
Opinion Page Editors..............JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
Sunday Page Editor.............ADRIENNE LYONS
Arts Editor.....................MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Sports Editor ALAN FANGER
Executive Sports Editors...... MARK BOROWSKI

Business Manager.......... ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Sales Manager..............KRISTINA PETERSON
Operations Manager........... KATHLEEN CULVER
Co-Dsplay Manager....:.........DONNA DREBIN
Co-Display Manager..........:..ROBERT THOMPSON
Classified Manager................SUSAN KLING
Finance Manager...............GREGG HADDAD
' Nationals Manager................ LISA JORDAN'
Circulation Manager.......TERRY DEAN REDDING
Sales Coordinator..........E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Cathy Baer, Glenn Becker. Joe
Brodon Randi Cloelnik. Maureen DeLove, Barb

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