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November 05, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-05

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State results
Baker, Laro lead challengers
in University Regent contests

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, November 5, 1980-Page 9
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
The Bush Program in Child Development and Social Policy
Fall 1980 Public Lectures
CURRENT ISSUES IN
EDUCATION AND PUBLIC POLICY
Schorling Auditorium, School of Education
Thursdays at 4 p.m.

Republican incumbents Deane Baker and David
Laro were headed for victories early this morning in
the University Board of Regents race.
With 12 percent of Michigan precincts reporting,
Baker had 27 percent of the vote and Laro had 25 per-
cent. Democratic challengers Stuart Hertzberg and
Nellie Varner each had 22 percent of the vote. Two
Libertarian candidates each received 1 percent. -
BAKER, A BUSINESSMAN from Ann Arbor, was
first elected to the Board of Regents in 1972. Laro, a
tax lawyer from Flint, was appointed Regent by Gov.
William Milliken in 1975.
There are eight Regents; each serves an eight-year
term. Baker and Laro are the only Republican
Regents.
Democrat William Byrum, with 29 percent of the
vote, was leading the Michigan State University

trustee race. Republicans Paul Gadola and Thomas
Reed were tied at 22 percent.
Republicans Richard Van Dusen and Kurt Keydel
were ahead in the contest for Wayne State University's
Board of Governors, with 27 percent and 25 percent of
the vote, respectively. University Education Prof.
Murray Jackson, a Democrat, was third, at 22 per-
cent.
Two representatives to each of the governing
bodies of the three major state universities are elec-
ted every two years in a statewide contest.
Republican incumbents Norman Stockmeyer and
Edmund Vandette were leading the race for State
Board of Education-each with 26 percent of the vote.
ONE OF BAKER'S primary concerns has been the
relationship between the University and the state
government. "We are responsible to the public and

the government," he has said, "but the university
system has to guard its particular freedom to seek
the truth."
Laro has been criticized by some students for his
position on University investments in South Africa.
He feels strict demands that invested companies
adhere to the Sullivan Principals could be harmful.
Laro has expressed reluctance to raise tuition rates,
and has pledged to vote for such an increase only af-
ter "the administration had done all it could to reduce
the budget."
Democrat Hertzberg, who earned his bachelor's
and law degree at the University, lectures at the law
school. One of his complaints is the state's low
priority for funding higher education. "Michigan has
gone from 13th to 39th per capita expenditure for
higher education (in the country)," Hertzberg said.

Patricia A. Graham
Former Director, National Institute of Education

November 6

WHY DO WE EDUC4 TE?

Michael Katz
University of Pennsylvania

November 13

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES
ON EDU(ACTIONAL REFORM
Co-sponsored by The University of Michigan School of Education

a

All seven ballot

proposals defeated

Michigan delegation
to Congress nearly
taken over by GOP

State voters overwhelmingly
defeated all seven proposals facing
them on the general election ballot
yesterday, including three questions
that would have drastically altered
the state's property tax structure.
Voters also struck down proposals
to reduce the state's legal drinking
age to 19 from 21, to construct four
new regional prison facilities and
provide funds for correctional pur-
poses, to allow state legislators to
abolish their immunity from civil
arrest during legislative ,essions,
and to restrict the duties of the
lieutenant governor as president of
the state senate.
PROPOSAL A-which was draf-
ted by state Reps. Perry Bullard (D-
Ann Arbor) and Roy Smith (R-
Saline) and backed by the powerful
Michigan Education
Association-was being defeated by
a 76,389 to 19,962 vote margin with
two percent of all state precincts
reporting.
Bullard said last night the
proposal lost due to a tangled effort
to derail Proposal D-the radical
Tisch tax cut proposal. "The
negativism on (Proposal D) carried
over to the other two proposals," he
explained. Bullard also said there is
a need for a broader coalition in the

legislature to support property tax
revisions.
The Tisch tax cut
proposition-Proposal D-was going
down to defeat by a 51,275 to 36,663
vote margin.
EARLY ELECTION returns in-
dicated Proposal C, which was
backed by Gov. William Milliken
and members of the state
legislature, was behind by a lopsided
66,096 to 20,496 margin.
Proposal B, the call to lower the
state's drinking age from 21 to 19,
was being trounced by some 58,000
votes against to 35,000 in favor.
Proposal E, which would have
levied a 0.1 percent income tax to
finance new prison construction and
other local and state correctional
facilities, was trailing by 48,868
votes to 24,678.
PROPOSAL G, which would lift
state lawmakers' immunity from
civil suits during legislative
sessions, was also behind by a 43,895
to 21,609 margin.
Proposal H, which would remove
the lieutenant governor as president
of the state Senate and establish a
procedure to fill a vacancy in the of-
fice of lieutenant governor, was
being defeated by a margin of 39,207
votes to 23,512.

DETROIT (UPI)-Democrats, for
the first time in eight years, were in
danger of losing control of Michigan's
pongressional delegation yesterday, as
four incumbent Democrats were locked
in tight races with big-spending
Republican challengers.
With less than 20 percent of the vote
in most districts at 10 p.m., Republican
chances of gaining strength in
Michigan's congressional Democrat-
dominated delegation appeared good.
BUT A self-professed white
supremist and a former mental
patient-both running against incum-
bent Democrats-fell far behind in a
pair of suburban Detroit districts.
Incumbent Democrat Donald
Albosta, plagued throughout the cam-
paign by clouds enveloping his use of a
$100,000 federal farm loan and his
brother-in-law's connection with an
agrifuels plant he helped secure funds
for, held only a narrow lead over
Republican state Sen. Richard Allen.
At press time, Albosta was leading
Allen 52 percent to 47 percent in the
sprawling 10th Congressional District.
IN ONE OF the election's tightest
contests in Kalamazoo, first-term in-

cumbent Democrat Howard Wolpe was
fighting to keep his spare 51 percent
lead over millionaire department store
owner, Republican James Gilmore.
Gilmore had secured 49 per cent of
the vote with nearly 30 percent of the
precincts in the Kalamazoo-area 3rd
District-targeted by the national
Republican party as a district for a vic-
-tory.
In one Michigan House race, the FBI
was reportedly investigating
allegations of vote fraud in one of the
state's closest and most expensive con-
tests.
In Grand Rapids, federal officials
were investigating charges that elec-
tions workers advised voters to cast
ballots for Democrat John Otterbacher,
a former representative, senator, and
U.S. Senate candidate who was narrowly
leading Republican freshman Drew
Allbritten in the Grand Rapids area.
Allbritten said his attorneys contac-
ted the FBI after receiving calls from
voters who heard poll workers give ad-
vice to others waiting to vote. Otter-
bacher could not be reached for com-
ment.

mssssssssses~u;:;;~~:;;so-------------------a..am

Judicial
Sresults
D11'dies;
tlfoessig
re lief
(Continued from Page 1)
"I think if we ignore the issue it may
very well come back," Shapiro said.
RICHARD HEADLEE, the author of
the 1978 Headlee tax limitation con-
stitutional amendment and now a
member of the Tisch tax cut forces,
said the people of Michigan have
clearly indicated that they want
property tax relief.
"I think the governor got the message
and will go back to the issue," Headlee
said from a Proposal D party last night
at the Bonnie Brook Golf Club in
Detroit.
This story was written by Julie
Engebrecht with files from Kevin
Tottis.
Bullard
re-elected
(Continued from Page i)
"We have to work on trying to pro-
'vide more employment and turn around
Michigan's economy," Bullard said last
night during a victory party at Thano's
Co. on Washington Street. But he added
-those tasks would be difficult to over-
come "with a turkey like Ronald
Reagan in the White House.
"PEOPLE WILL learn fairly soon
that electing a different president is not
going to help our situation," Bullard
warned. "The free market, 19th Cen-
tury approach Reagan believes in will
not solve our economic problems."

DETROIT (UPI) -Republican
Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice
Mary Coleman and independent Justice
Charles Levin easily won re-election to
second, eight-year terms yesterday.
The outcome leaves intact the
current delicate balance of three
Republicans, three Democrats, and one
independent on a state high court which

will in the near future likely be deciding
the sensitive partisan issue of reappor-
tionment.
In Michigan Court of Appeals races,
incumbents George Bashara and Vin-
cent Brennan were unopposed for six-
year terms in the 1st District which in-
cludes Wayne, Washtenaw, and
Livingston counties.

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PRESIDENTIAL
LECTU RE
SERIES
"Biology, Neuroscience
and Society"
Prof. Seymour S. Kety, M. D.

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Crisler
Dec. 3

Arena
8 pm

Tickets

go on

sale

TOMORROW

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