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November 04, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 4, 1980-Page 9

CITY OF ANN ARBOR
POLLING PLACES

Reagan says unhappy
Democrats to choose hun

WARD PRECINCT LOCATION
Ward One
1 Mary Street Polling Place
1 2 South Quad
1 3 West Quad
1 4 Michigan Union
1 5 Ann Arbor "Y"
1 6 Miller Manor
1 7 Community Center.
1 8 Community High School
1 9 Northside School
1 10 - Arrow Wood Hills Center
1 11 Mack School
1 12 Forsythe Jr. High School
1 13 Wines School

2
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2
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2
2
2

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3
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4_x
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Ward Two
East Quad
East Quad
Angell School
Stockwell Hall
Mary Markley Hall
Mosher-Jordan Hall
Community High School
Brookside Apts. Com. Rm.
Bursley Hall
Fire Station No. 5
Village Green Clubhouse
Logan School
Ward Three
2100 Crestland Dr.
Allen School
Allen School
Scarlett Jr. High School
Pittsfield School
Pittsfield School
Tappan Jr. High School
Bader School
Angell School
King School
Huron Towers East
Green-Glacier Community
Green-Glacier Comm. Ctr.
Clague Jr. High School
Thurston School
Ward Four
Pioneer High School
Lawton School
Pioneer High School
Track & Tennis Bldg.
Burns Park School
Cultural Arts Bldg.
Burns Park Shelter
Track & Tennis Bldg.
U.S. Army Reserve Bldg.
Stone School
Clinton School
Mitchell School
Univ. Townhouses Ctr.
Burns Park School
Fire Station No. 2
Ward Five
Dicken School
Dicken School
Eberwhite School
Eberwhite School
Bach School
Bach School
Slauson School
Fire Station No. 3
Slauson School
Haisley School
Haisley School
Lakewood School

ADDRESS
926 Mary St.
600 E. Madison St.
541 Thompson St.
530 S. State St.
350 S. Fifth Ave.
727 Miller Ave.
725 N. Main St.
401 N. Division St.
912 Barton Dr.
2566 Arrow Wood Trail
920 Miller Ave.
1655 Newport Rd.
1701 Newport Rd.
701 E. University Ave.
701 E. University Ave.
1608S. University Ave.
324S. Observatory St.
1425 Washington Hts.
200 S. Observatory St.
401 N. Division St.
1513 Jones Dr.
1931 Duffield St.
1946 Beal Ave.
1819 Village Green Lane
2685 Traver Blvd.
2650 Towner Blvd.
2650 Towner Blvd.
3300 Lorraine St.
2543 Pittsfield Blvd.
2543 Pittsfield Blvd.
2551 E. Stadium Blvd.
2775 Bedford Rd.
1608 S. University Ave.
3800 Waldenwood Lane
2222 Fuller Rd.
1001 Green Rd.
1001 Green Rd.
2616 Nixon Rd.
2300 Prairie St.
601 W. Stadium Blvd.
2550 S. Seventh St.
601 W. Stadium Blvd.
1150 S. State St.
1414 Wells St.
1220 S. Forest Ave.
Baldwin Ave. at Wells St.
1150 S. State St.
1980 S. Industrial Hwy.
2800 Stone School Rd.
2935 Birch Hollow Dr.4
3550 Pittsview Dr.
3200 Braeburn Circle
1414 Wells St.
1510 E. Stadium Blvd.
2135 Runnymede Blvd.
2135 Runnymede Blvd.
800 Soule Blvd.
800 Soule Blvd.
600 W. Jefferson St.
600 W. Jefferson St.
1019 W. Washington St.
2130 Jackson Ave.
1019 W. Washington St.
825 Duncan St.
825 Duncan St.
344 Gralake Ave.

From UPI and AP
PEORIA, Ill.-Ronald Reagan wound
up his 12-year quest for the presidency
yesterday, stressing his commitment to
a national economic rebirth and predic-
ting Democrats will put "country above
party" on Election Day.
Reagan, showing a confidence tem-
pered by the hostage drama, avoided
all comment on the situation, sticking
instead to the longtime centerpiece of
his campaign-an attack on President
Carter's economicrecord.
IN A SPEECH to 5,000 people at the-
site of one Lincoln-Douglas debate,
Reagan said Americans can expect
"more rhetoric, more misery" from a
second Carter term.
Meanwhile, John Anderson said
yesterday during a rally in Min-
neapolis, Minn. he believes his in-
dependent presidential campaign will
have an impact on American politics
far beyond today's presidential elec-
tion.
On his final day of campaigning, An-
derson indicated more strongly than he
has in the past he will likely play some

political role beyond 1980.
WHILE INSISTING that he still has a
! chance to win today, Anderson said his
supporters "are not going to shrivel up
and die in their political interest."
Anderson refused to predict his own
percentage, but said: "I think dramatic
shifts of the type we've never seen are
quite possible."
After speaking in Peoria, Reagan
flew to the West Coast for final cam-
paign appearances in Portland, Ore.,
San Diego and Los Angeles, where he
will vote and spend election night.
In Peoria, Reagan said he thinks
millions of unhappy Democrats are
"going to put country above party in
this election," and vote for him. His
aides said they felt the same.
Senior Reagan adviser James Baker
told reporters, "I think we're going to
win it." But he refused to predict the
margin of victory.
WHILE REAGAN himself declined to
say anything about the hostages, Sen.
Charles Percy (R-Ill.) discussed the

MSA plans to aid in
minority recruitment

situation while campaigning with
Reagan.
"Under no conditions do I feel the
Senate of the United States, the Foreign
Relations Committee or the people will
tolerate a hasty decision on the
hostages that would somehow imply
ransom or that we're going to get in-
volved in the war with Iran and Iraq,"
Percy said.
Others campaigning in Peoria with
Reagan were his running mate, George
Bush, former president Gerald Ford,
comedian Bob Hope and Illinois Gov.
James Thompson.
In a network television commercial
that was broadcast last night, Reagan
outlined his vision of America with a
series of patriotic images, including the
astronauts, the late John Wayne, and
the Pilgrims.

By JULIE HINDS
A Michigan Student Assembly com-
mittee, dissatisfied with current
University minority recruitment
programs, is making plans to start an
accelerated learning program in a
predominantly black Detroit high
school, if it can obtain the funds.
Members of MSA's Minority Affairs
Committee, in cooperation with the
Detroit public school system, hope to
recruit promising students for the
project, which will operate on an ex-
perimental basis. The program will in-
clude placing high school students in
classes with MSA-supplied advanced
texts, and sending committee members
to the school on a regular basis to
provide counseling services.
IF THE PROJECT is successful, the
committee hopes to expand it to other
schools.
According to Minority Affairs com-
mittee Vice President Ken Reeves, "If
you wait until the minority student gets
up here (to the University), then try to
help him , it's like putting the cart
before the horse."
A specific school and opening date for
the test case has yet to be named, and
funding for the project has not been ob-
tained. Committee members declined
to speculate on how the project would
be financed, preferring to wait for the
outcome of today's elections. They fear
that passage of Proposal D, the Tisch
tax cut amendment, will adversely af-
fect possible University funding.
REEVES SAID his committee
recommends that the University spend
less money on programs aimed at
retaining present minority students and
more on "preparing high schools
students for the University."
But George Goodman, director of the
University's Opportunity Program,
said he opposes shifting funds away
from retention programs. Goodman
stressed that Univesity programs such
as his own are concerned not only with
academic unpreparedness, but also
with the student's transition to college
life.
the ann arbor
film cooperative
TONIGHT TONIGHT
presents
THE DEER
HUNTER
6:30 & 9:30
Admission: $2
Aud. A, Angell Hall

Goodman also said he did not favor
the proposed MSA program. "I couldn't
support making a financial commit-
ment of any sort based on a small-scale
experiment conducted in one high
school," he said.
HE ADDED that the committee's
plan sounded too small to provide con-
clusive results on its success or failure.
But University Vice President for
Student Services Henry Johnson said
that University minority programs for
high schools are essential to solving the
minority drop-out problem, but
cautioned the committee on implemen-
tation of the project.
Johnson -said the question now was
whether "the committee's good inten-
tions can be translated into a viable
program supported by Detroit public
schools and the University, and
(whether) these two parties see the
committee (as being) capable and
competent" to run the program.
MSA President Marc Breakstone ex-
pressed approval of the project, and
called it an "innovative way to prepare
minority students" for the University.

If
*{
Now through January 4
A dmission $2; Students/Senors $1
Children under 12 with Adults Free.
H Nours: 9:3( a ro-5:3) p m. IueJsday hrough Sunday
Adiso 2 tdnsSnos$

Carter makes brief stop
at Detroit campaign rally

(Continued from Page 1)
western states-especially
Michigan-where the President has
fared more favorably in recent months.
The Associated Press, however, said
Carter strategists have not conceded
California.
Today's campaigning also marked
the first time that Carter asked Ander-
son supporters to shift their support to
him. "Obviously, the race is between
me and Ronald Reagan. I would like to
make a special appeal to those suppor-
ters of John Anderson," Carter said.
"I'd like to ask you in these last few
hours (before the election) not to waste
your vote."
On most of the important issues of the
campaign Anderson and the President
largely agree, Carter said. Carter
asked the crowd of about 1,000 persons
to consider the consequences to their
lives if they were to "wake up Wed-
nesday morning and find a right-wing
Republican administration in the White
House for the next four years."
"WE WANT TO keep a Democrat in
the White House for the working
people," Carter told the crowd, many

members of which sported United Auto
Worker buttons and jackets.
"My opponent is against the
minimum wage," Carter said, adding
that Republicans traditionally opposed
other social services such as social
security, Medicare, and a national
health insurance plan. "All of these
issues very important to the working
people of this nation must be remem-
bered (on election day)," Carter war-
ned.
Carter also lauded Detroit's
automobile industry. He said "one of
the most delightful experiences" of his
presidency was witnessing the
dramatic improvements in the
American auto industry. "We're going
to put those foreign cars out of the
market," Carter told the cheering
crowd.

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