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November 04, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-04

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 4, 1980-Page 3
CONFLICT INVOLVES UNIFICA TION CHURCH MEMBERS
Groupthreatens MSA with suit
Judiciary if the Assembly refuses togrant official could be repealed in the future if evidence surfaced
reognition in its meeting tonight linking CARP with illegal or unethical practices.

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Officials of the Collegiate Association for the
Research of Principles, a campus group associated
with the Rev. Moon's Unification Church, are
threatening to file a student law suit against the
Michigan Student Assembly unless the Assembly
recognizes them as a student organization.
MSA officials, however, including MSA President
Marc Breakstone, said they expect the matter to be
resolved in their meeting tonight. Breakstone said
he thinks that CARP will be recognized as a student
group and that an earlier motion to dismiss CARP
member Art Humbert from his position on the
Student Organizations Board will be dropped.
OFFICIAL RECOGNITION of CARP had been
hung up for several weeks in MSA when some
Assembly members alleged that the group is af-
filiated with the Korean Central Intelligence Agen-
cy and the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Some
MSA members also had alleged that CARP used
"physical and mental intimidation" in the recruit-
ment of members on campus.
Both Humbert and CARP president Bill Hilbert
strongly denied the charges of some MSA members
and threatened to file suit with the Central Student

"They're denying us recognition as a student
organization on unfounded beliefs," Humbert said,
adding that MSA is practicing "religious discrimin-
ation."
"IF AND WHEN we are'not recognized, we plan
to sue," Humbert said. "This is our recourse."
MSA also had taken the preliminary steps toward
removing Humbert from his membership on the
Student Organizations Board, an external MSA
committee which oversees and coordinates the ac-
tivities of student groups. The hearing required by
the MSA constitution before Humbert can be
dismissed from his position is to be held tonight.
Many of the MSA members who originally had
fought against the proposed recognition of CARP
told the Daily that they would no longer oppose the
motion.
MSA MEMBER H. Scott Prosterman, who had
been one of the leaders of the opposition in recent
weeks, said he now would support recognition "of a
probationary nature."
Prosterman, who had earlier cited CARP's "well-
documented ties with both the Korean intelligence
and the CIA," said such a probationary recognition

. W ..
Jon Feiger, MSA vice president for legislative
relations, said he too would no longer oppose
CARP's recognition. Feiger said he would not fight
against recognition because of "a lack of concrete
evidence. I think it was an emotional thing in the
past," Feiger added.
MSA member Tim Feeman, however, said he will
continue to oppose the proposed recognition on the
grouns that CARP is pledged to investigate students
with leftist affiliations. Feeman, who is also a
member of the Young Worker's Liberation League,
said he "personally feels threatened by their
presence on campus.
"As far as this Tuesday, I'll vote against them
(CARP) again and I'll fight against them again,"
Feeman said. "I would argue not to have them
recognized at all.
"My main reason (for opposing their recognition)
has to do with the fact that they have a very deep
association with Rev. Moon. . . and the Korean Cen-
tral Intelligence Agency," Feeman said. "The
organization's purpose has to do with the goals and
aims of the intelligence network."

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Lecture becomes an O'Reilly campaign stop

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL
MBA PROGRAM
An Admissions Representative from
Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration
will be on campus
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11
to meet with students interested in
the two-year MBA Program
Contact the
Career Planning and Placement Center
for more details and to sign up for
an information session.
Harvard Business School is committed to
the principle of equal educational opportunity
and evaluates candidates without regard to
race, sex, creed, national drigin or handicap.

By SUE INGLIS
What was billed as a lecture on "Ef-
fectiveness in Washington" turned into
another of yesterday's scheduled cam-
paign stops in Kathleen O'Reilly's
rigorous effort to unseat Republican
Rep. Carl Pursell in the 2nd District
Congressional race.
O'Reilly, a former head of the Con-
sumer Federation of America,
delivered a campaign pitch to a group
of about 12 people at the Michigan
Union yesterday afternoon before
moving on to shake hands at an auto
plant in Ypsilanti, in movie, theater
lines, and shopping centers.
"PEOPLE SAY 'Well Carl's not so
bad.' (But) we've lowered our expec-

tations," O'Reilly emphatically told the
group gathered at the Union for the
event sp9nsored by the University's In-
stitute for Public Policy studies. "I
think what this campaign comes down
to is consumer-voter expectations," she
said.
Pursell does not operate as a
legislator "out of a raw gut conviction
of where the county should be,'
O'Reilly said.
She pointed out that attorney and in-
dustrial lobbyist groups, not the federal
government, are now the largest em-
ployers in Washington. O'Reilly con-
tinued that legislators like Pursell are
"fertile ground for lobbyists because
you never know what they're going to

do. We're getting what we deserve all
over this country because we put them
(legislators) there."
O'REILLY emphasized her concern
for her constituents. "It will not take
long for those people in Washington to
know which district has the largest
student population and the largest
number of auto plants;" she said.
O'Reilly criticized President Carter's
decontrol of oil and gas when asked by
an audience member what her stand
was on energy. She strongly advocated
energy price controls to aid people on
lower or fixed incomes.
She explained her opposition to big oil
companies and support of government-
funded alternative sources of energy
which she said could achieve a 40 per-
cent reduction in consumption of oil
rather than the 10 percent present
reduction achieved by decontrol.

, _.

HAPPENINGS-
FILMS
AAFC-The Deer Hunter, 6:30, 9:30 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Cinema Guild-Potemkin, 7, 8:15 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
MEETINGS
Biological Research Review Comm.-4 p.m., 30871SPH 1.
His House Christian Fellowship-7:30 p.m., Michigan League, Rooms D
&E.
MSA-7:30 p.m., 3909 Union.
Science Research Club-7:30-10 pm., _Chrysler Ctr.
PIRGIM-Environmental Task Force meeting, 6:45 p.m., multi-
purpose room, Mosher-Jordan.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Saxophone students' recital, 6:30 p.m., Recital Hall.
Eclipse Jazz-Jam Session, 9 p.m., Count of Antipasto.
SPEAKERS
ECC & IC-Bag lunch lee., Josue Njock, "Global Living with Inter-
dependence: An African View," noon, Int. Ctr.
International Center-Lunch lee., Cornelia Herzfeld, "College Year in
Athens," noon, International Center lounge.
Bio. Engin.-Steven Goldstein, "Biomechanics of Cumulative Trauma
in the Upper Extremity," 4 p.m., 1042 E. Engin.
.iColl. Inst. forValues and Science-Victor Weiskopf, "The Nuclear
Peril,"4p.m., MLB.
Geology-Giampaulo Pialli, "Geology of Central Italy," 4 p.m., 4001
C.C. Little.
School of Education-Richard Alfred, "Synopsis of Decline; the Case of
Strategic Planning," 3:30-5 p.m., Dean's Conf. Room.
College of Arch. and Urban Planning/Masonry Institute of
Michigan-William Vetovitz, "Contemporary Uses of Masonry," noon, 2104
Arch. and Art Bldg.
Geology/Museum of Paleontology/Sigma Xi-Alan Walker, "2,000,001
B.C.: Early Human Life in Plio-Pleistocene Africa," 8 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheater.
MISCELLANEOUS
Cont. Ed. for Nurses-Workshop through Nov. 5, "Wholistic Health: Its
Place in Health Care," Airport Hilton.
English Comp. Boards-Sem., Jay Robinson, Daniel Fader, "Editing
and Revising," 4-6 p.m., 2553 LSA.
International Folk Dance Club-Teaching, beginning folk, 7-8:15 p.m.,
Bell Pool Mezz.
UAC-Workshop, Impact Dance, 7-9 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom.
Hillel-Course, Hebrew Calligraphy, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Rec. Sports-Clinic, "The Effect of Diet and Exercise on Metabolism,"
7:30-9 p.m., 1250 CCRB.
Student Arts and Crafts, shop-First class, Furniture for Small Living
Spaces, 7-10 p.m., 537 SAB.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109.

O"'Reilly
.. back on the trail

POP Qiz
Q w t e vricl needs

University students
evaluate choices

(Continued from Page 1)
"I'm being blackmailed into voting
for Carter. I'm voting against Reagan,
and I believe a vote for anyone else is a
vote for Reagan. I wish Icould vote for
Commoner, because I really like the
Citizen's Party."
M egan Forsythe,
seniior, LSA
"I distribute literature for the
Revolutionary Communist Party, and
the party has called for active op-
position of the elections because the
whole system is putrid. Elections are a
con game;,they create popular opinion
for policies that are predetermined by
the capitalists. I don't see any differen-
ces between the candidates."
Randy Schwartz,
graduate student, Rackham
"It's beneath my dignity to vote in
this election. I suppose if I wanted to
vote I'd vote for Commoner, but that's a
waste."
Jeff Wheeler,
senior, LSA
"I'm voting for Carter because he's
pro-choice and has appointed many
minorities to -important federal posts.
His four years experience will help his
decision making. I can't vote for
Reagan because he favors both
lowering the minimum wage for
minority youth and scrapping SALT
II."
Susan Hall,
junior, Business school
"John Anderson is the only candidate
who realzies that we're going to have to
change our lifestyles in order to get
along in the future. Plus, since the
major party candidates are so unaccep-
table, any significant showing by a

third party candidate could resultin
more acceptable candidates in the
future. It's like an investment for the
future."
Vic Filippini,
first year, Law school
"Looking at past records, Reagan's is
a lot better than Carter's. If Reagan
can do for the country what he did for
California, it would be great."
Jim Diggs,
freshman, LSA
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--7

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