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November 02, 1980 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, November 2, 1980-Page 5
Iranian paper advocates release

From AP and UPI
On the eve of what could be the
climax of Parliament's hostage debate,
e official newspaper of Iran's har-
line fundamentalists recommended
yesterday that the 52 captives be
released before the U.S. elections.
Without speculating on when the
hostages would be released, Tehran
Radio announced that the occupied U.S.
Embassy would be opened to "public
tours" on Nov. 4, election dayin the
United States and by coincidence, the
first anniversary of the hostages' cap-
ivity.
BUT THE editorial in the Islamic
Republic, the official newspaper of the
Islamic Republican Party, appeared to
be one of the most hopeful signs to date
0~ "
'U egn
rob1 t
willeai

that the Iranian Parliament was
moving towards a consensus to free the
hostages.
It was hopeful both because the
Islamic Republican Party controls the
majority of Parliament's seats and
because the main opposition to freeing
the hostages in the past has come from
the party.
Denying a bargain has already been
struck, Secretary of State Edmund
Muskie said yesterday in Washington
that extensive further negotiations with
Iranian authorities probably would be
needed even if the Iranian Parliament
decided to free the hostages soon.
"WE HAVEN'T reached any
agreement with them," Muskie said in
denying a published report that a deal

had been sealed to swap U.S. military
equipment for liberation of the cap-
tives.
In fact, Muskie told a news conferen-
ce at the State Department, authorities
in Tehran "are having quite con-
siderable difficulty in reaching
agreement" among themselves on
terms for freeing the Amgericans held
captive for nearly a year.
At the same time, he said he did not
know what proposal might be adopted
by the Majlis or when the Americans
might be released.
"I have no basis upon which to set a
time frame for a final resolution of the
hostage question," Muskie said.
Wearing a yellow "Free the
Hostages" ribbon in the lapel of his blue

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October 13-Applications available In 460 Lorch Hall
November 3-FInal deadline for applying
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blazer, Muskie dismissed as "an in-
credible proposition" suggestions that
President Carter has contrived the out-
come of the hostage issue to benefit
himself politically.
If that were his objective, Muskie
said, the 'hostages should have come
home weeks ago. "Anybody with an
ounce of political brains or instincts
wouldn't wait until the Sunday before
the Tuesday of Election Day," he said.
Randy Williams won the only gold
medal for the United States in the field
events in the 1972 Olympics, capturing
the long jump.
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places. (Continued from Page 1)
PUMA IS SMALLER and has less
strength than its comrades currently
employed in industry. While an in-
dustrial robot has a load capacity of 125
pounds, PUMA is designed to lift only 5
pounds.
The hazards of operating a large in-
dustrial robot in a research environ-
ment were emphasized by Mechanical
Engineering Prof. Milton Chace.,
developer of computer-aided design
programs for robot components.
"It's like having a wild animal in
your living space," he said. Chace
stressed the importance of integrating

safety features into robots' programs.
As for the potential impact of robots
on the human work force, Lee said he
sees little reason for concern. Total
automation of production plants would
have the effect of "shifting the work
force rather than eliminating the work
force," he said.
Humans would be relieved of mun-
dane tasks to fill-a whole new spectrum
of jobs, the researcher said, such as
programming, designing, maintenan-
ce, and assembling of robots. The
robots would do all the assembly work
on production lines and even perform
minor repair jobs on each other.

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When was the last time you went to the theatre?

UAC-MUSKET Presents Cole Porter's

I

IyTHi
0:D

5

Power Center

8:00pm Nov. 6,7,8&9

Tickets are $4, $4.50 & $5, available at
Ticket Central (1st fl. Union) and Power
Center Box Office

______________________________________________________

MURRAY

JAC

SON

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

FOR WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Our colleague, Murray Jackson, has contributed much to the
education of college students in the State of Michigan. As a faculty
member and administrator at-Wayne State University, as the first
President of. Wayne County Community College, and as a former
Director of the University of Michigan's Opportunity Program and
as an Associate Professor of Higher Education at Michigan since
1970, he has dedicated his professional life to helping studehts to
obtain the best possible education consistent with their own per-
sonal goals.
Murray's career has also been distinguished by public service
of an unusually broad scope. He has been and remains active in the
work of health organizations, his church, and civic associations. He
took a year's leave from the University of Michigan to serve as
Executive Director of the Detroit Council of the Arts. He is currently
a member of the State's Council for the Humanities.
His candidacy for a seat on Wayne State University's Board of
Governors fully merits our recommendation.

.

N

Thomas Anton
David Angus
Loren Barritt
Percy Bates
Lawrence Berlin
Bob Blackburn
Ella Bowen
Howard V. Brabson
Jean W. Campbell
Don Canham
William Cave
LaRue Cochran
Wilbur Cohen
Joseph Cosand
Joyce Dahart
Carolyne Davis
Donald Deskins

Ralph Gibson
Oscar Gish
Frederick Goodman
Gerald Gurin
Patricia Gurin
Don Harrison
Sue Holden
Irene Heller
Robert B. Holmes
Alan B. Howes
Gale Jensen
Harold Johnson
Juith Judd
Wilfred Kaplan
Hyman Kornbluh
Shelly Kovacs
Janet Lawrence

Charles Moody
Betty Moorison
William Morse
Jo Anne E. MacRae
Howard McClus ky
Virginia Nordby
Warren Palmer
Marvin Peterson
Marcus Plant
Stephen Pollock
Doris Priehs
James H. Robertson
Dave Robinson It
Jay L. Robinson
Rudolf Schmerl
Penny Schreiber
Alan F Smith

~.

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