100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, November 1, 1980-Page 3
...;........................:...................v'.v.v
....... :. . . ..:. ..{n. . . ..r . .:.:. . .. ~ . .~.,':} v"vv"

Prof says review process

itself can

hurt programs

By MAURA CARRY I
Reviews of various University academic programs
are necessary to ensure they are up-to-date and serve
a valuable function to the University. But reviews
focused primarily on possible program discontinuan-
ce in light of decreased state allocations to the
University may do more harm to academic programs
than good, according to the chairman of the Univer-
sity Budget Priorities Committee.
Dental School Prof. Robert Craig said the Senate
Advisory Committee on University Affairs is curren-
tly discussing the formation of a centralized review
committee that would evaluate academic programs
and suggest that they be discontinued if they do not
meet certain criteria.
BUT CRAIG SAID program reviews focusing
primarily on possible elimination "might be sort of
self-prophesying."
If students know that a particular department is
being reviewed with the possibility that it will be
eliminated all together, they will be less likely to con-
centrate in that academic field knowing that in a year
or two it might cease to exist, Craig explained.
SUCH A REVIEW could lead to the deterioration of

a department or program as a result of the review it-
self, rather than poor quality in the program, Craig
said.
Craig said reviews conducted by the various
schools and colleges are necessary, as opposed to
centralized reviews of all units. Unit reviews "should
be done on a routine basis,: as they are now, every five
years," he said.
Currently each school or college undergoes a
review every five years. The focus of program
reviews in the future will most likely focus on
possible departmental reductions in an attempt to
meet University President Harold Shapiro's goal of a
smaller university with a better paid faculty and
staff.'
Craig said these reductions will have to occur,
gradually. "Its a long-range thing, not a crash
program," he said.
WITH THIS YEAR'S reduced budget, each
academic unit will have to reduce its expenditures,
Craig said. These cuts must be an on-going commit-.
tment, not just a cut made this year alone, Craig ad-
ded.
"Program discontinuance has to be based on more

than an immediate crunch," Craig said. Currently,
the University Budget Priorities Committee is trying
to interact with various departments to see how they
will react to reduced allocations, he said.
SACUA chairman Arch Naylor said that the faculty
executive board is currently considering several
plans for handling the problem of reduced funds.
"WE HAVEN'T decided on any particular recom-
mendation to give the Senate Assembly," Naylor
said.
Earlier this week, SACUA members discussed the
possibility of the formation of a centralized review
committee that would work toward program reduc-
tion.
Naylor said he did not know of any cases where a
review had affected enrollment in a program, but
said he felt it could possibly happen. He said that
SACUA is considering all sorts of suggestions.
"We're merely in the discussion stage right now,"
Naylor said.
. SACUA will present its recommendations for im-
plementing Shapiro's "smaller University" proposal
to the Senate Assembly in January.

..... ... .. . .. ..... ....... .::: v. ::..::..{" :: ".: .:::.f: ::::tv::::.v:::: :v: "V:.: :": r:: ,::::. .... '::.: r: v::::n .v :::::n :":::: nv:::::.v:: r:.w:.v::.v::.v:: ::._r:: v:.v::: v:.: r::::::.:::. .a:
": vr..:. .. :".v": !.":r:"."vv:r:::":.v:::::::x.....vv.N...,.:w::.v::::: ": vn ...... ...... . :.-. : ..:
:.. ...r .r . .. ..... ............ .................... n....r.",:A.;, ", :...r:. :. r... rn ..... ...............-.. r... :. ....: n": r. ". :: :". .. .nv... .. ... ....v ............................ ...................... ...... n. ......... ...... -.ti" F}.i":.v*,":"."."ri "Fh".v'v v::fY:.....::..:..: .
.. . ... .:n .... n .f .. .......:...... .. r... ..... .. .nv ..... .. ". . .....t ..."?...{".. n . ....4.h ... ....... ......... ........ ..... ................ ... }....... .. .......r ........."ti.. ...n
r.. r .". .{. n.n.r .. r... .., .r r .. ................. ..............r ..... r... .....:. .... ...... X.r .......... {Z" ..r ..rr. r.... .. ..h.. ". }."... <":'{<"?:"?:"?:4%".v.
... fi..r .. ...... h......n..n.f .......... .n ...................... . v .... f"..... f."}:::: ..... }n.........v -::: w::: ..... ":.. .... . ...,........... ..}... . f0}:.v.. ?......
....r .. .... .. ...:.....r ......: ...
.... fvf .. ... %. ..........:..... ......... ... ....4......... 7+ .vr ...r ....... ... ......:....................v...v.......4.........n.... :. ...... 4 :.:{}:.: "... ,
: v::nvnv.v}::.wn":::n v:::: }:: }n......v .nv,.}.: }".y:.:v: .... nv v. :
.... s r r .... $.. n.......... n" ............. r...... }$.........,..r .. ... "} .. r....... n...... ....r ... 4 .. .. ............. ................... ....... r. 1....nn:. fi.: nv::.v::.v ": v.0.w:::" -.:":.v.........- } .. }. x.
.r...{ r.... r+ ......".fi.. r........ .r.........t.. .. {..... v...v.........:. ..n.. n....,}...... .. ".n .. ..........n ............. ........ ,....... , 4.x..4 ...n.
", vrn. " n... $... ...... .. :.. .. n. f... f........r ... ..:.... rn.. ..r ..... n ...................v...............v.. ..A......
. . n" r..... ....... ....... n.. ......... }r ......:.. }..... ..r r f.r .. n... .. ..r....... .. r...... .............. Y....4 4.......... ... .

REZA PAHLAVI, son of the late Shah, declares himself the new Shah of
Iran during a ceremony in honor of his 20th birthday.
Shah's son roclaims
himself Iran's king

S. Africa conference
revives question of
University divesture

CAIRO, Egypt (AP)-Flanked by
the Iranian imperial flag and a por-
trait of his late father, Reza Pahlavi
proclaimed himself the new shah
and rightful king of Iran yesterday.
In an 11-minute speech on his 20th
birthday, he promised "light beyond
the darkness" and called on patriots
inside and outside Iran to join in en-
ding the "nightmare" that Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini has brought to
their homeland.
THE SIMPLE ceremony, in a 150-
year-old Egyptian palace, was
filmed by an Egyptian television
crew. It was not carried on early
Egyptian television newscasts and
there was no indication whether it
was broadcast immediately on
radio.
Obviously, an attempt would be

made to~ get the message to the
Iranian people more than 1,000 miles
away.
DECLARING himself Reza Shah
II and rightful successor to the
Peacock Throne, he swore to defend
Iran's "independence, national
sovereighty, and the legitimate
rights of its people." His gran-
dfather, Reza Shah, established the
Pahlavi Dynasty in 1925.
"We must unite in love" to rebuild
Iran and "construct a com-
passionate society based on the
civilized values of justice, freedom,
order, and the rule of law," said the
6-foot former fighter pilot.
"I can understand and sympathize
with your sufferings and your inner
torment," he said. "I share your
misery and frustration. I shed the
tears which you must hide.".

I

Students attempt not
. to break eggs in contest

(Continued from Page 1)
wet sponges were commonly used
materials to pad the eggs within one
rigid containers.
The winner of the contest was Jerry
Alden, a junior in mechanical
engineering, who also was a finalist in
last year's competition.
"I WOULD SAY the biggest factor (in
Alden's winning the competition) was
his design," said Andy Jakimcius,
president of the engineering society.
Alden's drop from the maximum
height of 40 feet was not the fastest, but
his design was deemed the most
ingenious by judges Leland Quacken-
bush and Richard Scott, bpth professors
in the engineering college.

"Jerry's has got a recoil
mechanism," said Quakenbush.
Alden's egg container was an orange
juice can suspended between two
wooden supports by a piece of rope
which acted as a shock absorber.
Frank Drahuse, also a junior in
mechanical engineering, won second
place with his design of a container
stablized by four retangular flaps. Cash
awards of $30 and $20 were given to the
first and second place winners.
Six students finished the contest
without any broken eggs on their hands.
The fastest drop was an entry con-
sisting of a large cardboard box filled
with pillows.,

By CLAUDIA CENTOMINI;
The subdued campus issue of U.S.
corporate investment in South Africa
was re-opened this week during a series
of lectures and discussions sponsored
by the University's Committee on
Southern Africa.
Committee director Len Surensky
said the group traditionally has tried to
sponsor events on a monthly basis
related to the anti-apartheid movement
in South Africa.
"In this particular case, the in-
vitations just happened to come
together," he explained. The result was
the proclamation of South Africa Week.
PUMILE ZULU, a graduate of the
University of Zululand in Tanzania, told
a group of 30 persons gathered in Whit-
ney Auditorium in the School of
Education Building Thursday that the
United States is the largest foreign in-
vestor in South Africa today.
"Investments have been absolutely
crucial to building military and
economic power in South Africa," she
claimed. Zulu said American cor-
porations have invested $2 billion in the
nation, and that American banks have
loaned an equal amount to South
African businesses.
Zulu said corporations such as
General Motors, which she said
produces armored cars for the South
African government, are "helping in
this fire."
"SOUTH AFRICANS know what they
want," she continued, "the total
abolition of apartheid. We know who the
enemy is-apartheid, not whites in
general."
Alan Boesak, a South African
theologian, opened the .week's events
Monday with a speech on the recent
mixed-race school boycott by students
protesting educational discrimination
in that country.
"The idea of the student boycott was.
not to bring down the government,"
Boesak said, "but to educate society."
The class boycott, he said, exploded the
myth that the South African gover-
nment has instituted meaningful civil
rights reforms.,
"WE HAVE TO acknowledge the role
of black young people in South African
history," Boesak told a group of 55
listeners at the Trotter House. The
younger generation is a factor "that
anybody, including the South African
Pursell,
O'Reilly
debate

government, will have to recognize,"
he added.
"If one would look back," Boesak
said of the class boycott in South Africa,
"what has happened this year will un
doutedly be seen as one of the most im-
portant events" in the struggle to end
apartheid.
Neil Parsons, an author and
professor at the University of Oxford in
Great Britain, discussed the re-writing
of Southern African history for South
African schoolchildren before a group
of 25 persons in Lorch Hall Wednesday,
Oct. 29.

S

CASH

$

BUYING ANYFHING MADE OF GOLD OR SitVER
PAYING IMMEDIA TE

1
A"tSWnpfto
We stock a full line of clothing, boots, camping equipment.,
hunting clothing & winter coats.
201 E. Washington at Fourth
Open M-Sat 9-6 994-3572
15%/ OFF ALL
Merchandise .I
I I-
.with this coupon
(excep sale items)
Expires November 1, 1980
Emommnmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

RING BUYER
Gold teeth,-Gold Coins-Watch Cases-Jewelry
Anything marked 1OK, 14K, 18K, 22K, .999 Fine Gold, White Gold
OUR TRAINED PROFESSIONALS WILL TEST YOUR UNMARKED GOLD

HAPPENINGS
FILMS
AAFC-The Man Who Loved Women, 7, 9p.m., MLB 4.
Alt. Action Films-Fahrenheit 451, 7, 9:15 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Cinema Guild-All Screwed Up, 7, 9p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.;
Cinema II-Goldfinger, 7, 9 p.m., Angell, Aud. A.
Mediatrics-Carrie, 7:30, 9:30 p.m., MLB 3.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Contemporary Directions, Carl St. Clair, cond.,
Douglas Reed, soloist and disc., 7:30 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Dance-Lec./Demo., Peter Sparling, 8 p.m., Dance Studio A.
Dance Theatre Studio-Paula Hunter wiill present three solo dance
works, 8:30 p.m., 711 N. University.
School of Music-Piano Recital, Soyon Park, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
PTP-Mr. R. and Mr. H, 8p.m., Power Center.
Ark-Gamble Rogers, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
SPEAKERS
Hellenic Student Assoc.-"Acropolis: Testimony to an Ideal," Constan-
tine Padrides, 1p.m., Union, Rm. 101-103.
CIVS-The Warner-Lambert Science and Public Policy Colloquium, 9-12
p.m., 2-5 p.m., Rackham Ampitheatre.
MISCELLANEOUS
"Holiday Festival of Arts"-featuring 100 area artists, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.,
Washtenaw County Farm Council Grounds.
Ann Arbor. Art Assoc.-Annual juried membership show, opening
,mhain and nnnouncement nf awards. 7:30-9:30 n.m.. 117 W. Liberty.

lTED
CL-ASS
r RINGS
R EW ARD
14K 10K
Jumbo (40 grams).............21 600 . *.. .. 5000
Extra Large Ring (30 grams).... 16200* 11* $1 1300
Large Ring (21 grams).........1 11400*....... 7900
Average Ring (16 grams)..... 1 8100 ...... S 5700
Small (9 grams)................., 4900 ....... 1 3400

WEDDING
RINGS
l '" EW ARI
18K 14K
Extra 1g. Ring (11 grams)...... $7600 $ ..,.. $6000
Large Ring (9 grams)......$.......$6200 ....... $4900
Average Ring (7 grams)......... $480...... $3800
Small Ring (5 grams)......$3500 ... ....$2700
Very Small (3 grams).............,2100*... ...* $1700

'Prices Based on Latest New York Commodity Exchange Rates
The Gold market is UP! Sell Now!
REPRESENTING MAJOR N.Y. REFINERS OF GOLD
. .,.SELL DIRECT.
We guarantee to pay the prices we advertise!
We pay extra for the following brands:
L Balfour, Herf Jones, Star, Josten, Art Carved and Art Crest
Thurs., Oct. 30: Friday Oct. 31. Friday Oct. 31. Sat. Nov. 1. Sun. Nov. 2

(Continued from Page 2
abortions in those situationsl
"The 2nd district has a larger cam-
pus population than any other district in
the country," O'Reilly said. Whomever
is elected to represent the district, she
continued, should be a national
spokesperson for education.
LATER IN THE afternoon Pursell
spoke to a group of students.and faculty
at Rackham Auditorium in the first of a
series of lectures on policy making in
Congress. The series is being sponsored
by the University Institute of Public
Policy Studies and the president's of-
f:...

« . . .' . . ...ww1 L" \I ., w " ays" s 11 I s" Y " i_

CAMPUS INN
East Huron at State
769-2200
ask for ring buyer

THESE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
DESWAN MOTOR INN
45555 Michigan Ave.
Ypsilanti, Michigan
397-9016
ask for ring buyer

HOLIDAY INN
2900 Jackson Rd. at 194, West Bank
665-4444
ask for ring buyer
A A A 00 w% .Msl

i

..... ./ L ARMONYVMHOUSE

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan