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October 31, 1980 - Image 14

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-31

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SP RTS

Pge 14 Friday, October 31, 1980 The Michigan Daily

IM SCORES
W ednesdayOxford "A" 20, Butler "A" 0
Gomberg "A" 8, Hogs 0
Football Independent A Play-offs
Co-Rec Arbory Pirates 14, Balsa Blues 0
tick 18, Sigma Phil-Alpha Chi 6 Long Baiers 22, Skinheads 6
ins 8, Cambridge 6 Old Gang 20, Silver Streak 11 0
ter One Bites 6,Sigma Chi-AOPI 0 Independent B Play-offs
Residence Hall-A DAILY LIBELS 7, Nads 0 (forfeit)
A 20, Nads 0 Reefer Madness 1, Wango Tangto 0 (first downs)
yne A 14, Prescott 12 Whips, Chains, Leather Gang 20, The Mic's 0
go 28, Huber Challengers 0 Dish Rags 14, Bucks 2
Dions 12, MoJo 69er's U-Towers7, Prospectors 0 (forfeit)

ALUMNI UPDATE

Smith leaps

after chance

By BOB WOJNOWSKI
He was one of the best in what is quickly becoming
a legacy of fine Michigan receivers. There was Jim
Mandich,,Paul Seal, Gil Chapman, Paul Staroba,
Glenn Doughty, Ralph Clayton and Doug Marsh, but
invariably, when judging the excellence of a
Michigan receiver, Jim Smith is used as the
measuring device. And now that he has received a
chance to display his wares as a member of the Super
Bowl Champion Pittsburgh Steelers, others are
taking note.
His 31 pass receptions for a 20.1 yards per catch
average place him among the best in pro football; his
eight touchdown receptions top the entire NFL. Says
a Pittsburgh official, "Since early in the year he's
just been carrying this team."
BUT SUCCESS in the NFL has not come easily for
the former Michigan star. He came out of college as
the second ranking Michigan receiver in touchdown
catches and yardage gained for a career, and was
third in career receptions with 73. However, he
caught only four passes while playing sparingly his
rookie year of 1977, and he admits that the switch
from college star to a rookie in the pros was a
significant one.
"It was a big mental adjustment. It took at least a
half a year for me to get the new defenses down.
"It was tough not playing at first, but I knew there
were a couple of great receivers ahead of me and I
understood."
THOSE GREAT RECEIVERS to which Smith
refers are Lynn Swann and John Stallworth, both of
whom are slated to return from injuries before the
season's end. And where will that leave Smith?
"I have no idea. I'll deal with that when it happens.

We've lost three in a row so we definitely need em.
Indeed they do. With the Steelers' latest string of
losses, talk of another Super Bowl has tapered off to
talk of merely making the playoffs. And Smith is
cautiously optimistic.
"I THINK THIS TEAM is capable of getting to the
Super Bowl, but first things first, we have to worry
about Green Bay this weekend and then just winning
our division and getting into the playoffs."
With Smith now settling in as a stalwart on the Pit-
tsburgh receiving corps, he recalls without any
remorse his decision to attend Michigan, a notorious
run-oriented team.
"I don't regret it at all. I got the proper
recognition; maybe I'd have gotten a little more by
going to a passing team, but I wouldn't trade my ex-
periences at Michigan for anything in the world."
INCLUDED AMONG those experiences are
Orange and Rose Bowl losses. And when Smith
speaks of his greatest career thrill, Rose Bowl ap-
pearances and even Super Bowl victories pale in
comparison to that which he believes is yet to come.
"Certainly winning two Super Bowls was a
tremendous experience, but since I'm still young,
I'd like to think that my greatest moment is still
ahead of me."
Smith is undecided as to what lay even further
ahead, after the completion of his football career.
"I'D NEVER want to be a coach or anything like
that, but I have dabbled in some real estate in the off-
season and I enjoy it."
Smith admits that with the rigors of a long season it
is difficult to keep up with the current state of affairs
at the University.
"I haven't had a chance to see any of the games this
year or last; I just really don't get much of an oppor-
tunity at all."

JIM SMITH, WHO is often regarded as one of
Michigan's premiere receivers, has been a pleasant
surprise for the Pittsburgh Steelers filling in for the
injured John Stallworth. Smith seen here making an
aerial masterpiece against Wisconsin, ranks third
in total catches and second in reception yardage in
Michigan history.
But then he hastens to add, should someone misin-
terpret his statement, "not that my loyalties aren't
there of course."
Of course. Spoken like a true legacy.

It's for
i Is T TIf you haven't yet .con-
sidered a career in the
V1 communications industry, pause
a moment and reflect on the
world's dependency,on communications. Then
consider the major role communications will play
in the era of the Informational Society
we are now entering. Then welcome

RADIO HOST LOVES SPORTS:
Cameron spouts views

01

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future...today, with some 4,200
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If a career in communications interests you, contact your Place-
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of Ohio, 665 Lexington Avenue, Mansfield, Ohio 44907.

By DAN NEWMAN
To many, sports is considered an
outlet or means of escape from the
problems and hassles arising in daily
life. But to Ron Cameron, sports is his
life. He watches it, talks it, lives it.
To those who don't know him per-
sonally, he's just another voice over the
radio. Very few are aware of this man's
keen interest in collegiate athletes,
especially the Michigan Wolverine
program.
The sports talk show host for WXYZ
is very outspoken and has been an ob-
server of Michigan athletics for years.
In describing this year's 5-2 football
team, the 35 year-old said, "It's a solid
team, but not great. Bo's had better
teams, but guys like Edwards, Carter,
and Wangler have done fantastic jobs."
The sports talk host picks Michigan to
finish second behind a powerful Ohio
State team, but adds, "They're good
enough to make a fight out of it."
The Detroit native agrees with most
of Schembechler's decisions, and he too
would opt for Wangler at quarterback.
"No question," he responded.

"Hewlett's a good quarterback but the
team responds, better to Wangler."
Cameron was upset by the hazing in-
cident of a Michigan hockey player a
couple weeks ago. "It was bush-league
and it should be stopped from hap-
pening again in the future. I'd sit down
and have a good long talk with those
guys."
What about women's sports?
Cameron doesn't agree with Title IX,
which calls for a "proportionate"
amount of money to be spent on
women's athletics. "It's ridiculous," he
said. "Nobody gives a damn about wat-
ching old ladies play." '
The garralous announcer went on to
talk about professional athletes, many
of whom he doesn't have much respect
for. "Many of today's professional
athletes are pamperedt' and
disgraceful," he said. "An athlete's at-
titude changes once he gets into the
pros and that's why I. think in some
respects college athletics is better and
has a lot more going for it."
A pro athlete is much different than a
collegehone, according to the sports talk
host who has been on the air for almost

a year at WXYZ.
"For the most part, the guys in the
pros are a bunch of individuals who'
don't care as much as they should about
the team. They're mostly concerned
about the money," said Cameron. "The
college players have more enthusiasm
and are more team-oriented."
Cameron also points out that even
though many college athletes are ex-
tremely talented, his advisors will play
a vital role in determining how far the
player will go In professional sports
and how well he will do. "The college
athlete doesn't really know what he can
and can't do when he gets out of
school," explained Cameron. "That's
why it's important to have a good
agent, but for every good agent there's
ten bad ones."
Cameron believes that since
collegiate sports are, receiving more
nationwide exposure, the number of its
followers will continue to increase.
But he does see some problems with
college athletics. He's opposed to the
"win at all costs" theory that many
coaches around the country adhere to.
He feels it adds pressure on the
athlete's performance. "This thinking
puts pressure on the kid and sometimes,
causes him to make mistakes he might
not otherwise."

U E

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