100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 31, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

Page 8-Friday, October 31, 1980-The Michigan Daily
DEAD OF NIGHT
Five stories of nightmare and the macabre that chill to the bone. An architect
drives to a country home at night and becomes convinced that he is acting
out a recurring horror dream. Fellow guests try to disuade him, but . . .
laughter, terror and outrage build in intensity until the trap closes in the
surrealistic climax. On Halloween everyone should see a vision of horror.
Come see it in the dead of Friday night. Mighty Mouse in FRANKENSTEIN'S
CAT will be shown to set the mood.
Shows at 7:00 & 9:00. LORCH HALL

DATA BLACK TAKES SURVEY

48% of blacks polled won't vote

CINEMA GUILD

We sold our souls to film.

'"_

WJJX CHEAP FLICKSI
EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT

- - AT

EDITED1 MIDNG
VERSION E ' INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
"DEBBIE "t v tLiet 6-9700
DOES AT
DALLAS" MIDNIGHT RT
ALL SEATS $3.00 ALL SEATS $2.00

HT

S

NEW YORK (UPI)-A poll released
yesterday indicates 19 percent of
registered black voters surveyed are
undecided on the presidential election,
and 48 percent of all adult blacks sam-
pled are either unregistered or do not
intend to vote.
Were President Carter to lose the
black vote it would be enough to give
Ronald Reagan "a landslide victory,"
said former Manhattan Borough
President Percy Sutton, president of
Data Black, a year-old research agency
which has conducted four polls on black
voters this year.
pass up j
your chance.
Help prevent
birth defects

THE POLLS have shown that the
number of undecided voters has
remained steady during the year, un-
swayed by Carter's campaign.
In 1976, Carter won 90 percent of the
black vote, and Data Black's most
recent poll indicated 76 percent of
blacks who are likely to vote will vote
for Carter. Three percent will vote for
Reagan, and another 2 percent will vote
for independent candidate John Ander-
son, and 19 percent are undecided.
The survey, taken with telephone in-
terviews with 1,240 persons across the
country between Sept. 29 and Oct. 23,
has an error rate of 3 percent, said Data
Black.
"I CAN SAY categorically," said
Kenneth Clark, chairman of Data
Black, "that the choice for black voters
is between voting for Carter and not
voting."
Sutton and Clark said the indecision
among black voters is highest is urban
and politically key states.
In New Jersey, 43 percent of
registered black voters are undecided,
Sutton said. In New York that figure is
35 percent. Clark said the percentage of
undecided voters in other key states is
34 percent in Pennsylvania, 27 percent

in Illinois, 23 percent in Ohio, 20 percent
in Michigan, 17 percent in California, 16
percent in Texas, and 14 percent in
Florida.
SUTTON AND Clark said the lack of
enthusiasm for Carter's campaign
among black voters is due to a party
strategy that has taken blacks for gran-
ted.
"The strategy has been to frighten,
not address the problems," Sutton said.
"If you just frighten them with Reagan,
they will stay home."

"Civil rights has become very much a
non-issue," Clark said. "There seems
to be a gentleman's agreement to take
the black vote for granted."
Sutton said Carter must make a
special appeal to blacks on television
and radio.
"It is insufficient to talk about what
was done in the past, like the number of
black judges appointed," Sutton said.
"There has to be some commitment,
something to give blacks hope that;
things will be better in the future."

A,

2

teaceh*rcontract

asse -d-te- - -p-te
pase esie dipt

lopp,

By JANET RAE
Despite a dispute over wording that
the board claims may cost taxpayers
an extra $80,000 a year, the Ann Arbor
school board ratified a contract Wed-
nesday with the 1,059 teachers of the
district.!
The dispute arises from a question of
salary granted to experienced teachers
newly hired to the district. According to
School Superintendent Harry Howard,
incoming veteran teachers will be paid
$2,500 to $4,000 more under the contract
than thosesteachers who have equal ex-

perience within the district, according
to the contract.
The school board says that the wor-
ding oversight should be rectified by
paying the incoming teachers at an
equal basis as the old instructors.
But the Ann Arbor Education
Association does not want to allow this.
"We aren't going to permit them to
unilaterally arbitrate a contract," said
AAEA President Richard Taylor.
The AAEA has filed suit on behalf of
any incoming teachers.

«I 9,1~d,1

U A LLOW7EEN
CQQ-ISM, E PA T
0 peContesto r -t
~~-
GIVEAWAY
Aw4r/y %12/NE'
*SECONDR*CHANCE*
516E. LBETY, ANN ARBOR
---- DOORS OPEN 8!!!--
A*M/ECON D3 Sp * CHA Cshime*

I
i

GARGOYLE FILMS
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Rm 100, Hutchins Hall
7:00 & 9:00 $1.50
SPECIAL 3-D GLASSES
WILL BE PROVIDED.

Winner Best Film
Toronto Film Festival
- Newsday
ART GARFUNKEL
THERESA, RUSSELL
BD U!
A SENSUAL
OBSESSIION
FRI-7:40, 9:50
SAT, SUN- :00,53:10,
5:30, 7:40, 9:50
MON, TUES-7:40, 9:50

Sat, Sun $1.50 til 1:30

F INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ave oft iberty 761-9700
A story of
natural love...

BROOKE SHIELDS

0

ThE BLUE
bAGOON
FRI-7:10, 9:00
SAT, SUN-5:20, 7:10, 9:00
MON, TUES-7:10, 9:00

A

Call Red Cross
todayabout learning CPR-
cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan