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October 30, 1980 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0I

OPINION
Page 4 Thursday, October 30, 1980 The Michigan Daily

Edited and managed by students at The University of Michigan

Blow

by

blow

Vol. XCI, No.49

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, Mt 48109

A transcript of

the Daily's

0

Editorials represent a majority opinion of the Daily's Editorial Board

Watch those sweets!

attempt to cover a meeting

T OMORROW NIGHT, all across the
United States, millions of little
goblins will swarm to millions of front
doors and collect millions of pieces of
candy.
But the good old days of Batman
costumes and paper trick-or-treat bags
are gone for good. Those simpler times
have been replaced by such modern
conventions as rubber J.R. Ewing
masks, candy-coated Oompas-and
preventive dentistry.
Mind you, this is no simple "brush
twice a day" preventive dentistry.
This is preventive dentistry 1980-style,
designed explicitly to take any
remaining; semblance of fun out of
Halloween.
A California preventive dentistry
therapist this week announced several
precautions parents can take to help
make sure their children have no fun,
er, cavities this Halloween.
First, to discourage children from
snacking on candy as they go from
door to door, parents are advised to
serve their kids a nourishing, well-
balanced meal before they start trick-
or-treating.
Nothing like something from the four
food groups to ruin the old candy ap-
petite.
Next, parents should encourage
children to brush and floss their teeth
before they eat candy-this helps
reduce bacteria in the mouth which
react with sugar to produce acids that

result in tooth decay, the
reports.
Ugh. How scientific.

therapist

Third, careful guardians should let
the children eat all they want, but only
at one time-that reduces prolonged
acid exposure.
That way, stomach aches are almost
guaranteed.
Fourth, a specific time of day for
candy eating should be established. No
clear reason for that suggestion is
provided.
The best time would probably be
right before dinner.
Fifth, children should be encouraged
to eat candy with foods from the four
food groups because that helps clear
the mouth of potential acids. Again,
candy before or with dinner would be
most appropriate.
Sixth, parents should discourage
eating sticky foods that adhere to the
teeth and prolong acid exposures.
That effectively rules out caramel,
Milk Duds, and Jujy Fruits-three
candy staples.
And last but not least, parents should
hand out nuts, toasted corn, or sun-
flower seeds instead of candy.
That suggestion makes the least sen-
se. If other parents are giving your
kids cavity-causing sweets, it's only
right that you should give their kids the
same thing.
Happy Halloween.

The demise of Viewpoint

M ICHELE CARTER, Viewpoint
Lectures chairwoman: "I don't
know. I really don't know. Maybe they
want comedians, magicians."
Carter and her Viewpoint and
University Activities Center associates
are not happy today. The lecture series
is in serious trouble. With thisweek's
reluctant scrapping of the scheduled
Abbie Hoffman appearance, there are
no lectures planned for at least the
next four months-a sad precedent in
the history of the student-run lecture
organization and a poor reflection on!
the state of the University.
One temptation is to blame students
for their lack of support and their
apathy. Another is to criticize
Viewpoint for staking so much on just
two events this term: Ralph Nader's
"Truth in Testing" speech and the
Shana Alexander-James Kilpatrick
"Point-Counterpoint" debate. These
two events, which attracted a total of
1,700 listeners, put Viewpoint nearly
$9,000 in the red.
The third temptation is to assail the
YER ONERAH'N\ INNOCENT
OF TAKIN' BRIBES, OF ILLICIT
5EX AND GENERAL.
RAUNCHINES6!

skyrocketing fees that lecturers
demand nowadays, making the costs of
large-scale lectures terribly
prohibitive.
In fact, all three problems are to
blame for Viewpoint's demise.
Further, students have snubbed even
Viewpoint's free lectures this term.
One listener showed up (late) to hear
state Rep. Perry Bullard speak and
about 12 showed up to hear U.S.
congressional candidate Kathleen
O'Reilly. Clearly, these were relevant
speeches for students in these pre-
election days.
All in all, it is a sad bunch over in the
UAC offices as they contemplate the
past, present, and future of Viewpoint
Lectures, and wonder whether
comedians and magicians are in fact
the way to go. In the end, what the
organization needs is student ad-
vice-and lots of it.
UAC President Neale Attenborough
said this week that his organization
wants to "find out what the hell the
deal is with people on this campus."
We wish him luck.

What follows is a transcript
taken from a tape recording of
Tuesday night's confrontation
between Daily staff members,
University personnel, and the Ann
Arbor police. The Daily reporters
and photographers were attem-
pting to gain entry to a closed
meeting of the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics-a
meeting that the Daily editors
believe should have been open to
the general public.
The Daily staff members quoted
are Editor-in-Chief Mark Parrent,
Opinion Page Editor Joshua Peck
(both of whom were arrested for
allegedly trespassing on University
property), Sports Editor Alan
Fanger, reporter Maureen
Fleming, and photographers David
Harris and Lisa Klausner.
Associate Athletic Director Don
Lund and Assistant Athletic Direc-
tor Will Perry are the University
personnel, and Staff Sergeant Ar-
thur Hughes of the Ann Arbor
Police Department, who directed
the police operation, is the only of-
ficer quoted.
The transcript has been edited
and condensed where necessary.
FLEMING: We'd like to find out why (the
Board meeting) isn't open if there's a reason
for it..
LUND: You got a lawyer?
FLEMING: We have a lawyer, yeah.
LUND: Bring him )wn, we'll talk to him.
FLEMING: The L.Ang is that right now, we
feel the meeting should be open.
LUND: Well, is that what your lawyer says?
FLEMING: Yeah.
LUND: Let me see it in writing, will you?
PERRY: Don't cr...
PARRENT: Don't crowd me.
PERRY: I'm just standing here.
PECK: So go in; we'll follow you.
PERRY: Shh. . . Oh, I wish I were back in
Southfield.
FLEMING: Could I have your name please,
sir?
PERRY: Nah.
PARRENT: Will Perry.,
FLEMING: Will Perry?
PERRY: That's not my name. How do you
know I'm Will Perry?
PARRENT: I don't.
PERRY: I'm just trying to get through a door
which you guys won't let me through.
PECK: You won't let us through. We want
you to go in.
PARRENT: It's the other way around, sir.
PERRY: You were kind of pushing me. I'm
trying to get through.
PECK: If they would have let us ing...
PERRY: You were kind of pushing me,
weren't you?
PECK: My hands weren't on you, sir.
PERRY: Your body was on me.
FLEMING: So you don't know whether it
should be closed or not. Do you care
whether the meeting's closed?
PERRY: I was just invited to the meeting to
give a report. That's all I know.
FLEMING: Oh, that's unfortunate it had to
happen tonight...
PERRY: Now I can't get into the meeting to
give a report.
PECK: You can if we can.
(Hughes and another police officer arrived,
and called the Daily reporters and editors
together.)
HUGHES: You want to . .You put a tape
recorder on, and we're going to have a
problem.
PARRENT: Why is that, sir?
HUGHES: Because what I want to talk to you
about is in here, and I don't need it on tape.
PARRENT (to Fleming): You can put it on

tape. (To Hughes) Is there a law?
FLEMING: If it's off the record...
PARRENT: (Inaudible) and you know you're
being recorded.
HUGHES: Yes.
PARRENT: O.K.
HUGHES: And I don't think it's necessary.
PARRENT: Go ahead and tape.
HUGHES: Don't I have some privacy?
PARRENT: Tape it.

Daily Photos by DAVID HARRIS
DAILY CITY EDITOR Patricia Hagen is taken out of Crisler Arena (above). Editor-in-Chief

Mark Parrent is handcuffed by police (below).
good idea to check why we're here?
HUGHES: I intended to do that when I was
talking to Mr. Canham ...
PARRENT: I'm not sure he knows.
HUGHES: Now just one minute.
PARRENT: O.K. #
HUGHES: O.K.? My understanding of it is, is
that this is a University building, and Mr.
Canham is incharge of these buildings. O.K.?
And if he says that the building is closed, and
not for use of the public at the time, then I
assume he would have that authority.
PARRENT: All right. Are you aware of the
Open Meetinigs Act? Are you familiar with
that law?
HUGHES: I don't know what the meeting is ...
that's why I'm trying to find out what is going
on.
PARRENT: I would suggest checking that,
though. Because if they're holding a meeting
that falls under the Open Meetings Act, then
the public has a right to be here. It's not
trespass if you're attendingsa meeting that
should be open. That's our basic contention.
HUGHES: That's your basic contention.
PARRENT: That's right.
HUGHES: Well, I don't know what the
meeting is, that's what I intend to talk to Mr.
Canham about or his designee and find out
what the circumstances are. I just want to let
you know what procedure I'm going to go
through, so that we're all aware, we're all
working in the same ballgame. You have your
rights, he has his rights, and we're.. .
PARRENT: I just want to let you know what
we're here for.. . We just want to get into that
meeting.
HUGHES: All right-Well that'll be up to him
on what he's going to do on that.
PARRENT: Well it's really up to the state
law.
HUGHES: It is. Well, O.K.
PARRENT: Yeah.
HUGHES: O.K.
PARRENT: All right.
(Hughes went into the Board meeting to
speak to Canham and returned ap-
proximately 10 minutes later with some prin-
ted materials.)
HUGHES: O.K., this is the Open Meetings
Act.
(According to the University) the Act ap-
plies only to the meetings of the Regents..
That's what (Canham is) going by . . . This

.'

r

IN MAN pEFeNGe, AN
O~FFEiR TN1' CONGRE5SIONAL

PARRENT: No, we're not violating it, Mir.
Canham's violating it.
HUGHES: Yeah, it's your interpretation of
the law versus ... the prosecutor, the Univer-
sity lawyer, and that's a matter that should be
settled in court, not in a problem here.
PARRENT: We still think it's an open
meeting that should be ... (inaudible)
HUGHES: (To photographer David Harris,
who had been flashing pictures throughout
the conversation): Don't play games, fella.
You flash that in my eyes once more.. . (To
photographer Lisa Klausner): That goes for
you, too, lady.
KLAUSNER: I didn't hear what you said.
HARRIS: What's the law on that?
HUGHES (Shouting): DON'T FLASH THAT
IN MY EYES ANY MORE. THAT'S A
VIOLATION OF MY RIGHTS. I WANT TO
SEE, ALL RIGHT?
KLAUSNER: Sure. It wasn't in your eyes,
I'm sorry ...
HUGHES: Yes it was. I have glasses on.
KLAUSNER: Excuse me. I don't think.. I
don't think it's against the law to take pic-
tures.
HUGHES: IT IS TO BLIND ME WHENI.
CAN'T SEE TEMPORARILY WHEN I'M
TRYING TO PERFORM MY DUTY. YOU
UNDERSTAND?
KLAUSNER: I understand what you're
saying-...
HUGHES: O.K.
FANGER: How about when we're trying to'
perform our duty?
PARRENT: Al, Al.
HUGHES: Now. You've'been advised.. . the
Trespass Act . . . I have talked to Mr.
Canham. Ascfar as you being inhere (the
Crisler tunnel), there'll be no problem-as'
long as you cause no problems. If you try to;
progress further, the Trespass Act will be en-
forced.
(A few minutes later, Peck headed for a'
partition that the Daily staff believed led toi
the Board's meeting room. Peck was stopped,::
and Parrent interceded on Peck's behalf.:
Hughes then asked Parrent to leave the
building.)
HUGHES: I'm asking you to leave. I want you-
to leave; we're going to throw you out.
PARRENT: We're ... We don't want to leave.
HUGHES: You don't want to leave?
PARRENT: No, sir.

VI 1 { t1 1 t 1 Vv. -w. -.- PRINCIPLE /F/
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/ WHAT CONGRE551NIANL'
A PRINCPLE ?

BOOZE MAD'E%
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