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October 29, 1980 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tisch refines plans
to fight University

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 29, 1980-Page 7
BEGIN WARY ABOUT U.S. CAMPAIGNS
r
Israel mad a Weizman

By KEVIN TOTTIS
Tisch forces contined to prepare
for legal battle with University
President Harold Shapiro yester-
day, but have not taken any official
action.
"We've been working for 21 hours
on it (the case), but are not yet
finished," Robert Tisch said yester-
day.
In recent weeks, Shapiro has come
out strongly against Tisch's

Proposal D and in a newsletter sent
to members of the University com-
munity last week called the effects
of Proposal D on the University
"devastating."
TISCH ALLEGES Shapiro should
have filed and registered his cam-
paign with the Secretary of State but
did not. The Shiawassee drain com-
missioner and his attorneys plan to
seek to force Shapiro to file and
register.

JERUSALEM (AP)-Former Israeli
Defense Minister Ezer Weizman's ap-
pearance on President Carter's cam-
paign trail in the United States has
touched off a furor in this country.
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
rebuked Weizman yesterday and the
Israeli government took pains to
disassociate itself from what appeared
to be a public endorsement of Carter's
re-election campaign by ,a top Israeli-
personality.

Basic geography class fills gaps

for students at.

BOULDER, Colo. (AP)-When Hazel
Morrow-Jones began teaching
geography six years ago at Ohio State,
several students took a map she gave
on her first quiz, turned it upside down
and labeled Australia as the United
States.
Morrow-Jones-now a professor at
the University of Colorado-said she
was dismayed at the time, but since has
grown accustomed to students who
can't find their own country on a map or
think the United Kingdom is a group of
Middle Eastern nations.
In fact, so many students lack basic
geography skills that the university
here has added a new course this
semester-basic geography.
"I THINK I've got a truly exceptional
class if they can place countries on the
right continent," said Morrow-Jones in
an interview this week after a session of
Geography 198, World and Regional
Geography. "You'd be surprised how
many put Nicaragua in the middle of,
Africa somewhere."
Morrow-Jones said most of her
students don't know much more about

their own cou
the world.
"Westerner
New England
ners, the Plai
a bunch of sq
know the Sou
which is Ken
nessee. The
heavens no, fa
THE ENRO
about 50-ra
seniors, physi
ts to geograp
requirements
majors andn
not easy.
The chair;
department,
yesterday tha
tors have co
knowledge of!
students.
"The aspec
tral is that we
junior high s
school in mo
Loeffler.. "It

Colorado college.
ntry than about the rest of great deal of misinformation or lack of
information to that."
s are lost with a map of COLLEGES HAVE the same
1," she said. "For Easter- obligation to teach geography to
ns and Western states are students who are not properly prepared
juares. Northerners don't that they have to teach English to those
th. They can't remember who lack writing and grammar skills,
tucky and which is Ten- Loeffler added. But the curriculum at
Carolinas? Oh good most schools is so crowded that getting
)rget it." such a course into the schedule is im-
)LLMENT in her class is possible.
nging from freshmen to During Monday's class, Morrow-
ics and economics studen- Jones gave her students the basic
phy majors. It fulfills no layout of the "developing countries,"
for anyone but geography adding liberal doses of sociology and
Morrow-Jones insists it's economics "so the kids don't fall
asleep."
man of the geography At least one dozed anyway after
-John Loeffler, said finishing his homework "for another
at he believes several fac- class. But others said they liked the
ontributed to a lack of class because it filled gaps in their
geography among college knowledge that hampered their other
studies.
t I suppose is really cen- "IT'S NOTHING Iididn't get in fifth
are terribly remiss at the grade, but I guess I didn't listen the fir-
chool level and into high st time around," said one senior, a 21-
st of the country," said year-old woman majoring in foreign
think we can attribute a languages.

IN AN INTERVIEW on Israel
Television, Weizman countered by
saying: "The lion's share of our foreign
policy is in effect intervention in U.S.
internal affairs." He cited diplomatic
efforts to convince congressmen and
administration officials to support
Israel.
Begin said he "deeply regretted"
Weizman's "intervention in the elec-
toral process of another country."
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
called it "a violation of the unwritten
laws" governing relations with a
foreign power.
THE CONTROVERSY arose when
Weizman, a populr former air force ace
who quit Begin's Cabinet last May,
joined Carter on a campaign flight
Monday to Huntington, W.Va. and
Cleveland, Ohio.
Weizman, in interviews with the
Israeli media, was unapologetic and
praised Carter's Middle East record as
a "giant contribution to peace.''
As for Republican presidential
nominee Ronald Reagan, Weizman
said: "I don't know him."
HE BRUSHED ASIDE rebukes from
Israel and from American Jews, saying
he joined the fight because "Carter in-
vited me."u
Begin, deliberately disassociating his
government from Weizman's actions,
Be an angel .
a
Read 01 be tajlg
764-0558

Is

~1

took the unusual step of publishing
remarks on the affair made during a
closed door Cabinet session.
Begin said non-intervention in
another country's election was a "car-
dinal principle," and he stressed
Israel's gratitude to "the American
people regardless of political af-
filiation" for any U.S. aid to Israel.
Begin's associates portrayed the af-
fair as another nail in Weizman's
political coffin. "He is brilliant, but this
just shows he is irresponsible," said one
unidentified official in Begin's office.
Since leaving the Cabinet, Weizman
has remained a member of Parliament
but he rarely attends sessions and has
no official function.

FRANK LANGELLA
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Dern's Plank 10' fails
to fund ERA supporters

uilleon pipes

Irish Dance Champion

Master of ceremonies: DESMOND RYAN
Admission:$5 at the MICHIGAN THEATER, 603 E. Liberty

WASHINGTON (AP)-For a while
last summer, it looked like feminists
had won control of the Democratic Par-
ty's purse strings and would employ the
party's resources to benefit only can-
didates who support the Equal Rights
Amendment.
Last August, after the Democratic
National Convention adopted "Plank
10," Eleanor Smeal of the National
Organization for Women gleefully told
a reporter, "I still don't believe the
male leadership of this party knows
what has happened."
AS IT TURNED out, not much of
anything happened.
Plank 10 commited the party to
denying aid to candidates opposed to
ERA. But its adoption hasn't made
much difference.
Frank Bierlien, research director for
the Democratic National Committee,
says he doesn't know of a single instan-
ce where a Democratic candidate has
been denied aid because of his or her
ERA stand.
WHAT THE PLANK says seems
clear enough:
"The Democratic Party shall
withhold financial support and
technical campaign assistance from
candidates who do not support the
ERA."
Party officials are interpreting that
sentence as applying only to resources
controlled by the national party, which
rarely has much money to pass around
to Democratic office seekers.
THAT INTERPRETATION leaves
state and local units and independent
outfits such as the House and Senate
Democratic campaign committees free
to spend the money they raise the way
they wish, without regard to how the
recipients stand on ERA.
"We do not regard that plank as ap-
plying to our committee," says Scott
Wolf, research director for the Senate
Democratic Campaign Committee.
And in Columbia, S.C., former state
Democratic chairman Donald Fowler,
who sits on a committee that raised
$31,000 to pass out among state

legislative candidates, says the commit-
tee is not asking candidates for their
ERA views before writing its checks.
"THAT RESOLUTION passed by the
convention is not binding on this com-
mittee," declares Fowler, who says he
personally is a "strong, strong ad-
vocate of ERA ratification."
South Carolina is one of the 15 states
that have failed to ratify the amen-
dment. And the legislators who will be
elected Tuesday apparently will have
the final say-so on ratification: ERA
dies June 30, 1982 unless five more
states ratify by then.
About all this, the feminists are not
happy.
They're displeased that it took
Democratic National Chairman John
White until Oct. 3 to appoint a commit-
tee to deal with the ERA question.
Even then, the mandate he assigned
the committee was not to cut off funds
for anti-ERA Democrats aut to
"develop a meaningful role for the
Ui im

Democratic National Committee in the
very important effort to secure the
ratification of the Equal Rights Amen-
dment."
The committee, composed mostly of
ERA supporters, has not met.

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