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October 29, 1980 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-29

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Ninety-One Years
of
Editorial Freedom

Lit I3U1

lttla

CLOUDY
Partial cloudiness and low
temperatures. High in the
mid-40s. Lows in the 20s.

Vol. XCI, No. 48 Copyright 1980, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, October 29, 1980 Ten Cents Twelve Pages

Editors arrested outside
athletic board meeting

By MAUREEN FLEMING
and TOM MIRGA
The editor-in-chief and an editorial
page editor of The Michigan Daily were
arrested last night following an attempt
to gain admittance to a closed meeting
of the University's athletic department
board in Crisler Arena.
Mark Parrent, editor-in-chief, and
Joshua Peck, editorial page editor,
were arrested by Ann Arbor police for
allegedly trespassing on University
property. They were released last night
on personal recognizance and face
arraignment next Tuesday in 15th
District Court.
PARRENT, PECK, and several other
members of the Daily staff tried to at-
tend the University Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics meeting,
which was held in the Hospitality Room
in Crisler Arena. The Daily contends
the meeting should have been open
because the newspaper feels the board
falls under the jurisdiction of the state's
Open Meetings Act of 1976, according to
Parrent.
The act is intended to open the
deliberations of public policy-making
bodies to public scrutiny. The Daily
maintains that the Board in Control is a

policy-making body since -it controls
funds of the athletic department and
formulates many department policies,
Parrent said.
The University has contended that
the act applies only to meetings of the
Regents.
POLICE WARNED the Daily staff
members they would be charged with
trespassing if they persisted in their at-
tempts to enter the meeting. "It's not
trespassing if you're attending a
meeting that should be open," Parrent
told police.
University Athletic Director Don
Canham said following the meeting that
the board does not come under the
jurisdiction of the Open Meetings Act.
"We make policy on our own depar-
tment," he said. "We don't make
decisions on tax dollars because we
don't use tax dollars."
Canham also said the meetings
historically have been closed because
the board discusses personnel matters
and-other "sensitive isspes."
"WE TALK ABOUT a lot of things
that we're not ready to publicize," he
said. For instance, Canham explained,
the board last night "was toying" with
the idea of constructing handball courts

beneath Crisler Arena.
Canham said that depending on the
agenda, future meetings could be open.
He explained that at the next meeting
the board would be discussing the
"bowl bid."
"You can come down and listen (to
that one)," he told reporters.
PARRENT SAID he has asked
Canham, through the Freedom of In-
formation Act, for the minutes to all
Board meetings dating back to March
31, 1977. Parrent said he also asked
Canham earlier in the week for the
agenda for the meeting held last night.
"The Daily has never asked me for an
agenda," Canham said. All the paper
has to do is to call, Canham explained,
and he will mail one. But Parrent
claims Canham told him in person last
Friday that an agenda did not even
exist.
The Daily believes last night's
meeting was particularly important,
Parrent said, because staff members
anticipated discussion of the recent
hazing incident involving members of
the hockey team and the current Title
IX investigation.
A COPY OF the agenda obtained af-
ter the meeting showed both items were

scheduled for discussion.
The Daily had requested last week
that the meeting be held in public, but
Parrent said Canham, University
President Harold Shapiro, and Univer-
sity General Counsel Roderick Daane
all refused that request, citing state at-
torney general opinions.
Parrent said he contacted the state
attorney general's office and the county
prosecutor for help, but both agencies
refused to pursue the case.
THE DAILY HAS since hired private
attorneys, who are currently working
on the case.
University lawyers contend,
however, that the Daily, by virtue of its
legal connection with the University,
cannot initiate lawsuits against it.
Director of University Security
Walter Stevens call the arrest incident
"terribly unfortunate."
"I ALWAYS HATE to see this hap-
pen,". he said. "I think there should
have been other avenues to resolve this
matter."
Parrent and Peck were arrested
shortly after police officers read to the
group of editors and reporters the state
trespass act and told them that attem-
See DAILY, Page 6

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
ANN ARBOR POLICE officers handcuff Daily Editor-in-Chief Mark Parrent
outside Crisler Arena after arresting him last night for allegedly trespassing.
Parrent and other Daily staff members were attempting to attend a meeting
of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics.

*War, peace central issues

in Carter-Reagan

CLEVELAND (AP)-President Carter and Ronald
Reagan argued war and peace in climactic campaign
debate last night, the president accusing his
Republican challenger of "dangerous and
belligerent" talk, Reagan retorting that the use of
force should be "always and only a last resort."
From lecterns precisely 15 feet apart, orb the stage
of an ornate Music Hall, the Democratic president
and the Republican challenger traded answers and
rebuttals, under questioning by four reporters and
.commentators.
THEY CLASHED on taxes and economic policy,
each accusing the other of proposals or practices that
would fuel inflation. Carter called Reagan's proposed
three-year, 30-percent tax cut inflationary and
"highly ridiculous."
The president said Reagan's vow to scrap the pen-
ding strategic arms limitation treaty with the Soviet
Union is "a very dangerous and disturbing thing."
"I am not talking of scrapping," Reagan replied.
He said he wants to take the treaty back into renewed
negotiations with the Soviet Union. "That is hardly

throwing away a treaty and being opposed to arms
limitation," he said.
"GOVERNOR REAGAN is making some very
misleading and disturbing statemepts," Carter shot
back. He said Reagan wants to discard the treaty,
and suggests that nuclear superiority and the threat
of an arms race, would be U.S. bargaining positions
under a new GOP administration.
Reagan said his policy would not be to insist on
American nuclear superiority, but to call for mutual
arms reductions "to the point that neither country
can represent a threat to the other."
"This attitude is extremely dangerous and
belligerent in tone, even though said in a quiet voice,"
Carter said.
CARTER CAME ON strong on the war and peace
issue, a theme of his campaign against Reagan, in the
90-minute debate, one week before the presidential
balloting. So did Reagan.
John Anderson, meanwhile, crashed the Carter-
Reagan debate electronically, insisting there "really
is no significant difference" between his two major

.debate
party rivals for the presidency on whether the United
States "can fight a limited nuclear war."
Anderson said he wished he were there on network
television with its perhaps 100 million viewers.
But he had to settle for Constitution Hall in
Washington, a few blocks from the White House, wat-
ching his two rivals on a television monitor and then
"debating" them in a format designed by Cable News
Network.
Reagan cited his experience as governor of
California which prompted Carter, in rebuttal, to say
that during his eight years as governor, Reagan
submitted three of the highest tax increases ever
enacted in the state.
Reagan responded that Carter's remark was "a
distortion" of the record and said that state gover-
nment spending in California increased at a lower,
rate than did state spending in Georgia when Carter
was governor of that state.
The debate-one week before Election
Day-followed months of political maneuvering and
skirmishing over terms for a debate.

Ford's $595
million loss
tops record

DETROIT (UPI)-Ford Motor Co.
reported a third quarter loss yesterday
of $595 million, eclipsing a one-day-old
record set by General Motors Corp.for
the largest quarterly loss in U.S. cor-
porate history.
Ford's worldwide deficit for 1980-the
auto industry's worst year on
record-now amounts to $1.23 billion.
In an unusual circumstance, Ford
lost money both in its North American
and foreign operations. It listed its U.S.
deficit for the quarter at $569 million
and its foreign operations loss at $26
million.
FORD SAID its worldwide dollar
sales in the third quarter were $8
billion, down 11 percent from the same

period last year, while
deliveries slumped 24
898,000.

unit vehicle
percent to

In the U.S., Ford's car sales are off 33
percent so far this year.
At this time last year, Ford had ear-
ned $1.2 billion.
Like GM, Ford said it expects its for-
,tunes to improve in the fourth quarter
and into 1981.
"The company's results should begin
to improve in the fourth quarter
because of gradual economic recovery,
favorable acceptance of Ford's new
products and the continued effect of
cost reduction actions," said Ford
Chairman Philip Caldwell.

Experts tackle 'B'
in Markley debate,

FUTURE OF LECTURE SERIES BLEAK:
Viewpoint nixes Hoffman

By BARRY WITT
1 President Carter and Republican
presidential candidate Ronald Reagan
were not the only debaters last night.
Approximately 75 Markley Hall
residents heard a supporter and an op-
ponent of Proposal B-the question of
lowering the drinking age from 21 to
19-square off on the issue in the dor-
mitory cafeteria.
"Do you want to save young lives?"
Peter Fletcher, a spokesman for the
Michigan Council on Alcohol Problems,
a private organization that opposes
Proposal B, asked the audience.
FLETCHER CITED the recently-
released Highway Safety Research In-

stitute report as giving voters a "clear
choice" on the way to vote on the
drinking age-a negative vote.
The study found that after the
drinking age was raised to 21 last year,
fewer alcohol-related traffic accidents
occurred among 18- to 20-year-olds than
would have been expected according to
trends of the last decade.
But Fletcher's opponent, state Rep.
Richard Fitzpatrick (D-Battle Creek),
said the report is only one inter-
pretation of the statistics and that not
even the agency that contracted the
study, the Michigan Office of Substance
Abuse Services, supports the con-
See DRINKING, Page 6

By STEVE HOOK
Viewpoint Lectures, citing depleted funds and dubious
student enthusiasm, has cancelled the Nov. 12 lecture by Ab-
bie Hoffman.
With this cancellation, Viewpoint's future is "virtually on
hold," according to chairwoman Michele Carter. Although the
struggling lecture organization is not dead, "its condition is
extremely critical," she said. "We're not going to do
anything for a period of four months."
Instead, Carter continued, University Activities Center
officials will reevaluate the future of Viewpoint and discuss
how to resurrect the organization.
"WE WANT TO get more concrete evidence on what type
of programming students want," said UAC President Neale
Attenborough. "We want to find out what the hell the deal is
with people on this campus."
Viewpoint has lost nearly $9,000 so far this fall-$6,300 on

the James Kilpatrick-Shana Alexander debate, and $2,583 on
the September address by Ralph Nader. Accordingto Atten-
borough, UAC has a total budget of $30,000 after paying ad-
ministrative costs, and the other UAC departments, such as
Mediatrics Films and the Musket theater group, could not
compensate for such an extensive loss.
Chairwoman Carter said Viewpoint had been expected to
lose money, but not as much. "Those other committees can't
financially support Viewpoint any longer," she said.
Hoffman, the ex-Yippie who recently ended his seven-
year exile, originally was scheduled to appear Nov. 6 at Hill
Auditorium, but because of legal preoccupations, he had to
reschedule the date for the 12th-and the only site available
then was theMichigan Theater, which seats a smaller number
of people. But despite the increased difficulty of making
money at the Michigan, UAC officials decided to hold the
See VIEWPOINT, Page 6

Hoffman
.,.lecture cancelled

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TODAY
Our own debate
DEBATE AMONG the candidates for University
Regent will be held tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the
Anderson room of the Union. A three-member
panel with representatives from the faculty,
the Daily, and the Michigan Student Assembly will question
te two incumbent Regents Deane Baker and David Laro,
and challengers Stuart Hertzberg and Kurt O'Keefe. '

said a WTVS spokesperson, were courtesy of cable
news.
A Christmas game
What happens when you roast chestnuts on an open fire?
Well, you could collect $5 from each of your friends for
providing a taste treat or you might have to pay $20 for
smoke damages if you forget to close the flue. And be wary
of caroling too. You might win a $1 singing award, but you
could get slapped with a $24 fine for disturbing the peace.
It's all part of the latest fad in the "Christmas game," the
brainchild of Fred and Eileen Gosman. "It didn't make

while others present some of the peaks and valleys common
to holiday shoppers. Gosman said there is virtually no skill
involved, and a game takes 15 minutes for two players to
finish and 30 minutes for four. U
You only die twice
Doris Archer is going to be keeping a stiff upper lip from
now on. That's because Doris is dead-for the second time
The Actor's Equity union Monday forced the British Broad-
casting Corp. to conduct a second "funeral" for Doris, the
fictional grandmother on the world's longest-running radio
serial, The Archers. The first character to be killed off in 25
years, Doris was mourned again on tape by union members

played the part for almost 30 years, was in a nursing home,
too ill to continue the role. But one network official stressed
that Berryman would not be listening to the mock funeral:
"I don't want her to listen," the official said. "Even when
you know a character is going to die it's still a shock to hear
it." The last time a member of the fictional Archer family
was killed off was Sept. 22, 1955, when Doris' daughter-in-
law Grace burned to death trying to rescue a horse. But if
serieals are ridiculed in the U.S., in Britain at least, they
are held in-high esteem. Among The Archers' three million
estimated listeners is Queen Elizabeth II. With Doris'
"death," only two members of the original cast remain:
June Spencer and Norman Painting, who was just 22 when

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