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October 28, 1980 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-28

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Page 12-Tuesday, October 28, 1980-The Michigan Daily

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Abuse of elderly increasing

LANSING (UPI)-The fifth com-
mandment says "Honor thy mother and
father." But many frustrated adults
have turned to beating or neglecting
their parents instead.
"Granny beating"-the abuse,
neglect-or exploitation of the elderly by
their children or grandchildren-is on
the rise both in Michigan and across the
nation, according to state officials.
IN THE U.S., government studies
estimate as many as 2 million persons
over age 65-out of a total of 22
million-are abused by their children
each year.
No reliable statistics are available in
Michigan because officials believe the
number of cases reported represent
only a fraction of the abuse that ac-

tually occurs.
Parent abuse legislation patterned
after the state's child abuse laws has
been in the works for nearly a decade.
But lawmakers are stalled over such
questions as who has jurisdiction in
parent abuse cases-police or state
agencies?
INCIDENTS OF physical
abuse-such as the hammer beating of
a Chicago man by his 19-year-old
daughter-grab the grimmest headlines.
But parent abuse is more often found
in the passive neglect of parents, said
Susan Sweeney, who runs a program
funded by the Department of Mental
Health and Social Services.
"They (children) know their parents
can't go shopping, can't cook and can't

take care of themselves. But they
ignore them."
IN ONE WASHTENAW Court case, a
middle-aged college professor refused
to buy his 88-year-old father cigarettes,
took away his television, and would not
let him make telephone calls.
Others exploit elderly parents by
coercing them to sign over Social
Security or pension checks and
pocketing the cash.
Michigan's poor economy undoub-
tedly has led to an increase in parent
abuse, Sweeny said, but society also
plays a big role.
WHILE TODAY'S lifestyles have
become more mobile and temporary,
values have not changed accordingly,
she said.

"A lot of the problem is that our
society has changed a lot but peoples'
values are still turn-of-the-century
values. We still feel we're supposed t
keep our parents at home, and that
may not be a realistic expectation
now."
But fear of what the neighbors will
think often keeps elderly victims from
reporting their children to police or
going to mental health centers for help,
she said.
IN ONE CASE, an elderly Detroit
woman refused to report an incident i
which an out-of-work son slapped he
when she tried to calm his rage over
losing unemployment benefits, causing
her to fall and break a hip.

TONIGHT 8 PM
A READING BY
EDWARD DORN
BENZINGER LIBRARY
EAST QUAD
(East University Between Hill
and Willard)
THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED

THE DEADLINE
TH HAS BEEN
CHANGED

History
found in
local
homes
OBJECTS D' ART (Continued from Page 1)
from around the Inc., a local advertising and
world are on dis- marketing firm, but at one time it.
play throughout was the first social center in the
the home of Uni- Midwest that connected a religious
versity Archeol- denomination with a University
ogy graduate stu- community.
dent Susan Wine-
berg. Her home is The homes of Ann Arbor residents,
part of a tour of such as University archeology
historic Ann Ar- graduate student Susan Wineberg,
bor buildings. were also included on the tour. Built
in 1866, the original woodwork of the
house at 311 E. Ann remains intact.
The hand-blown window glass is also
a remnant from the days of the first
owner, carriage- and cabinetmaker
James Royce. The house, complete
with floor-to-ceiling French win-
dows, also is decorated with
Wineberg's collection of objets
d'art-such as dolls, shoes, candy
tins, jars, and Turkish rugs-from
around the world.

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1

Daily Photo by MAUREEN O'MALLEY

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October 31, 1980
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O'Reilly accuses Pursell of not
using influence to help district

By PAM KRAMER
With one week to go in her campaign
for U.S. Rep. Carl Pursell's Second
District seat, Democrat Kathleen
O'Reilly minced no words last night in a
lecture highlighting Republican's shor-
tcomings.
Pursell is not doing his part to in-
fluence his peers in Congress on mat-
ters of particular interest to his district,
O'Reilly told the 12 people at the
Viewpoint Lecture in the Michigan

Union.
"WE HAVE THE right to demand
very special treatment," O'Reilly said,
because this is the congressional
district with the largest campus
population and the largest number of
automobile plants of any district in the
country, she said.
"But people are saying, 'Carl's not so
bad, we could do worse.' And we're
buying it," she exclaimed.
"We've got to wake up and say we
stand for something, we demand (bet-

ter representation) .. . I, for one, am
willing to take the chance to raise
your expectations," the former head of
the Consumer Federation of America
said.
THE CURRENT CONGRESS is like
the "great minds of the 12th century
gathered together in one place,"
O'Reilly said.
"I don't mean to disparge the entire
12th century," she added.

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