100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 04, 1980 - Image 98

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-C-Thursday, September 4, 1980-The Michigan Daily ,

Ann Arbor has food for every thought

AVERAGE
COSTS:
$1.50-4.00

Angelo's Lunch
1100 Catherine
668-9538
Bicycle Jim's
1301 S. University
665-2650
Bimbo's
114 E. Washington
665-3231
Brown Jug
1204 S. University
761-3355
Burger King
520 E. Liberty
994-4367
Central Cafe
322 S. Main
665-9999
Cottage Inn
512 E. William
663-4636
Count of Antipasto
S. University & Church
668-8411
Dominick's
(Downstairs)
812 Monroe
662-5414
Dominick's (Upstairs)
812 Monroe
662-5414

FARE:
American
breakfasts

$1.95-5.95 Sandwiches,
soups, and
salad bar
$2.75-7.50 Italian-
American
food
$2.00-6.00 Pizza and
hamburgers,
beer and liquor
$1.00-3.00 American
food
food
$4.00-5.00 Mexican-
American
food
$3.00-6.00 Italian
food,
hamburgers
$1.00-3.50 Italian
food,
sandwiches

DESCRIPTION:
Thick, homemade white
or raisin toast makes
the meal worth it.
Good place for
lunch, somewhat
expensive.
All you can eat
specials daily.
An all-purpose,
well rounded
collegiate diner.
Typically, across
the street from
McDonald's.
Less expensive
lunch menu,
(2.00-4.00).
Good pizza,
somewhat espensive.
Actually serves pizza
squares with more
than pepperoni.
Enjoy your pizza and
beer outdoors during
nice weather,
good atmosphere.
Sit on the balcony
while eating scampi,
shrimp, or other'
specialties

Drake's Sandwich Shop
709 N. University
668-8853
Eden Foods
330 Maynard
995-0148
Falafil Palace
629 E. University
994-4962
Fleetwood Diner
300 S. Ashley
668-9084
Frank's
334 Maynard
761-5699
Gandy Dancer
Old Depot.
769-0952
Kings Arms Pub
118 E. Washington
663-9757
Kamakura Restaurant
611 Church
769-0008
Krazy Jim's
551 S. Division
l 663-4590
Maude's
314 S. 4th
662-8485
McDonald's
337 Maynard
995-2476
Olga's Kitchen
State & E. Washington
663-1207
Old German
120 W. Washington
662-0737

$1.50-5.00 Sandwiches,
fresh citrus
drinks
$2.00-4.00 Vegetarian,
natural
foods
$2.00-4.00 Falafils,
Mid-East
pastries
$2.00-4.00 American
food
$2.00-4.00 Greek-
American
food,

$8.25-17.50

Fresh
seafood

$1.95-6.95 Sandwiches,
fish & chips,
steaks

Try their cream cheese,
jam, peanut butter,
ham, Am. cheese,
tomato sandwiches.
Features the Complete
Protein, a chipati with
hommos, cheese,
sprouts.
A great alternative
to Big Macs and
Whoppers.
Large servings.
Known as the top-ranked
greasy spoon in A'.
A nice break from
McDonald's and right
across the street.
Historic setting along
with great food-nice
when the folks come to
town (get the point?).
English style pub.
Just opened over the
summer.
Specialty is sashimi
(raw fish) dinners.
Cheaper lunch menu.
An Ann Arbor,
institution. Designed for
bankrupt college
students.
Specialty is baby-back
ribs. Over 10 different
salads on menu.
In an elaborate food
building. You know
the rest.
Greek fast-food
restaurant.
Try their sauerbraten
or wiener schnitzel.

Orange Julius
1237 S. University
668-9773
Orient Express
State & William
668-1332
Pan Tree
Liberty & Division
665-9919
Pizza Bob's
814 S. State
665-4517
Pizza Bob's
Uptown-810 S. State
665-4518
Pizza Bob's
Midtown-618 Church
995-5095
Pretzel Bell
120 E. Liberty
761-1470
Real Seafood Co.
341 S. Main
769-5960
Rick's American Cafe
611 Church
996-2747
Saca Taco
414 E. William
995-0405
State Street Deli
800 S. State
761-5899
Suppenkasper
S. State & N. University
663-0261
Thano's Lamplighter
421 E. Liberty
665-7003
Wolverine Den
1201 S. University
769-8364

$1.50-3.00 Hamburgers,
hotdogs,
Orange Julius
$1.50-5.00 Oriental
food
$3.00-7.00 Quiche and
crepes
$3.00-5.00 Pizza, subs,
and shakes
Ditto. Ditto
Ditto. Ditto

Have to try the
Julius, a sweet orange
juice/milk combo.
Oriental fast-food
restaurant. Recently
opened.
The only downtown
24-hour
restaurant.
Fast-food restaurant
with a crazy
atmosphere. Great
pizza subs.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Good salad bar. All
you can eat specials
Sunday-Thursday.
All the seafood is,
ironically enough,
fresh.
All you can eat specials
daily. Burritos a
big seller.

4

$5.95-11.95
$5.00-12.00

Family style
American
food
Fresh
seafood

r

$2.15-3A0

Pizza,
sandwiches

$4.45-15.00
$1.00-4.00
$2.95-12.95

Japanese
food
"Blimpy"
burgers
Family style
American
food (not for
burgers and fries)

$4.50-7.50 Italian
food

$1.00-4.00 Mexican-
American
food
$ .79-2.98 Mexican
food
$2.00-5.00 Kosher
food
$3.00-4.00 Soup and
salad bar
$3.00-6.00 Greek,
Italian,
American food
$3.00-4.00 Greek-
American food
Sicilian pizza

$1.00-4.00

American
food

Mexican fast-food.
Good burritos but
skip the tacos.
Good stackead deli
sandwiches.
The editor's choice.
Variety of soups and
large saind bar.
Not open at night.
Some consider it
to have the best
pizza in town.
Try their Gyros.

I

$2.00-4.00 Greek
food
$4.00-8.00 German-
American
food

4

/

A

2

publications relieve 'textbook overdose'

11135ouuniversity. UlAn nv y- o" By LISA CRUMRINEN
662-3773.- While pursuing the academic path of
one's choice may, to outsiders at least,
seem almost Utopian, dorms, classes,

I. -..
,,, 7
(5 .

lunch lines, libraries, and all night
cramming may become confining at
times. In order to alleviate this feeling,
there are some interesting Ann Arbor
publications capable of relieving your
study-saturated mind.
The Alchemist and the Ann Arbor Ob-
server are the feature-oriented
newspapers of Ann Arbor. In additionrto
extensive articles, these papers each
carry a guide to various daily cultural
events in Ann Arbor. Distributed in
local businesses and some University
buildings, these monthly publications
are available at no charge to Ann Ar-
borites.
TWO YEARS AGO, the editor of The
Alchemist, Bill Zirinsky, noticed a
"media gap in the city," caused by the
age between the readers of The
Michigan Daily and the Ann Arbor
News. In response he formed a new
paper which was "to be decidedly more
liberal than the News." In addition, its
would cover music, politics, art, and
wholistic health, among other things.
Despite the fact that the paper depends.
on advertising revenue and volunteer

workers for its livelihood, it has grown
from its initial 12 pages to about 30
pages currently. Although the paper
emphasizes the "twenties age
bracket," according to Zirinsky, "it
considers itself a part of the University
community, finding that there are an
awful lot of interesting University
people to write about."
Making its deput in the summer of
1976, the Ann Arbor Observer-started as
"a publication that focused on Ann Ar-
bor, on what's going on, covering both
Ann Arbor town and the University" as
described by Editor Don Hunt. Like the
Alchemist, the Observer too has expan-
ded to an investigative periodical which
features articles on business,
education, trends, and University sub-
jects, among other topics.
Because of the overwhelming size of
the University, students need a
publication that pulls University events
information all together. Published by
University Activities Center, the Maize
is an information calendar containing
articles on various University
organizations' activities. It i is

distributed in many University
buildings once a month.
ALONG THESE SAME lines is the
University Record, which publishes a
concise weekly calendar invaluable for
finding out what's on the "official"
agenda for the week. It is compiled by
the University Publications Office. It
also provides University financial
news, Regent news, information e
grants and job listings.
Certainly being informed about
everyday news in a vast and unpredic-
table world is vital. There are two daily
newspapers, the student-run Michigan
Daily (see living section, p. 4) and the
Ann Arbor News. In addition to fun-
ctioning as a city newspaper, the Ann
Arbor News includes much University
news, "putting what happens at the
University into perspective for th
residents of Ann Arbor," said Cit
Editor Bob Romaker. "The University
news is of statewide and national in-
terest."
Among other local pubiciations
available to students is the newspaper
Black Perspectives, written by and ap-
pealing to black students at the Univer-
sity. The University's Board for
Student Publications, in addition to
publishing the Daily, also publishes
the ageless humor magazine, Th
Gargoyle, and a literary magazin
called Rising Star. Both are written b
students, and are directed towards a
student audience.
There are many other publications in
Ann Arbor, and students are en-
couraged to seek them out in order to
alleviate the psychological withdrawal
that tends to result from textbook over-
dose.

FAMOUS FOR OUR RESTAURANT
HOME-MADE BREAD
" BEST BREAKFASTS IN TOWN (Try the waffles 1)
" SANDWICHES * SALADS 9 DINNERS * SEAFOOD
" CARRY-OUT SERVICE-668$9538
Corner of Catherine and Glen
(short walk from Med. Center).
3.8.
A Jewish Experience For Evey Jewi
ifillcitPA
A -
gsetu
715 Hill St. (Car. of Oakland) Ann Arbor
CHABAD HOUSE FEATURES:
KOSHER KORNER RESTAURANT
" FRIED CHICKEN, HAMBURGERS, FELAFEL AND MORE
" A FULL LINE OF DELI
" MEAL CONTRACTS, SPECIAL DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE
CLASSES
" READING Hebrew
" translation and meaning of prayer
" Chu mash (Hebrew Bible) and
" Shuichon Aruch (Jewish low)
S sTalmud
" A Chassidic approach to Mysticism

Do a Tree
a Favor:
Recycle
Your Daily

ii

Jacob on

THE
CROISSANT
SHOP
317 W. URON

=7r/zA 'A

SEEMS- 7 'r V 7

mptribd.f

V WEMM,

I Adv] A.f WW7Tr 7 \. I

it

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan