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October 25, 1980 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-25

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'I

ARTS

The.Michigon Doily

Saturday, October 25, 1980

Page 5.

m

Performance guide
This week's Performance Guide, covering the week from tonight through
Thursday, October 30, was compiled by arts page staffers Mark Coleman,
Dennis Harvey, Anne Gadon and Josh Peck.
MUSIC
Steel Pulse/Rubber City Rebels-Punk and English reggae make for
strange, but intriguing bedfellows. On record Steel Pulse's blend of "roots"
reggae and studio refinement seems a bit sterile, but hopefully their already
strong songs will gain some power and looseness live. Anyway, live reggae is
so rare in the States that this show shouldn't be missed. The Rebels are from
Akron (natch) and sound like it (as in the Dead Boys, rather than Devo/Pere
Ubu).. Monday, October 27, Second Chance, 516 E. Liberty. Music should
start sometime around 10 p.m.
Talking Heads-An exciting new album, an expanded band line-up, and the
best live band extant in America. Get it while you can. A seat in the back of
Masonic is better than nothing. Thursday, October 30.8:00 p.m.
The Roches-Maggie, Terre and Suzze bring their eccentric New England
folk to the Power Center. The just-released album Nurds is something of a
disappointment, straining for the wierdness that seemed more authentic and
touching on their first two records-but the wry charm is still there, and the
Roches' mock-amateur we're just-a-bunch-of-girls appeal gives them a
unique likeability in concert. Thursday, October 30, 8:00, Power Center.
MOVIES
Kid Creole and Jailhouse Rock-By now most people would like to lay the
King to rest in peace, but these two films are required viewing for rock and
roll fans, especially if you don't understand all the attention Elvis received
after his death. The plots are contrived, the direction inconsistent at best,
but the action is well-paced and Presley is undeniably charismatic in both.
King at 7:00, Jailhouse at 9:00, Saturday, October 25, Aud. A.
he Parallax View-Probably the best (and first) of all the '70's political
paranoia thrillers, with Warren Beatty as a news reporter who discovers the
Terrible Secret behind an assassination. Crisp, intelligent, confusing (as this
genre always is) and with some neat visual touches, Parallax is an un-
derrated nightmare in broad daylight. Wednesday, October 29, 7:00 and
10:00, MLB 3.

LUTHER ALLISONAND GUITAR

Too much o'lf

By FRED SCHILL
Let's get it straight: Luther Allison
can play a blues guitar, perhaps better,
than anyone else. He proved it again
and again Wednesday before the im-
pressed legions thronging Rick's
American Cafe.

Allison plays with a passionate,
powerful precision. The conventional
Chicago blues played by practically
every blues band in existence were
rendered singularly spectacular by
Allison's solos.
ALLISON WENT INTO frequent and

agooc
protracted jams with his adequate but
outclassed backup band throughout the
three sets he played before a spirited
crowd. The expected solos were tran-
sformed into marvels of guitar craf-
tsmanship before our very drunken
eyes as Allison gave the quintessential
lesson on how to play that instrument.
If I were a guitarist I swear I
wouldn't pick the thing up for a month.
Sometimes Allison even sang har-
mony with his guitar, wherein lies the
problem both with Luther Allison and
the show: Allison does not have a par-
ticularly useful blues voice. In fact,
Allison does not have a particularly
outstanding voice for any kind of music.
THIS IS NOT to suggest that he is a

-.
Ithi~ng
poor singer (believe it or not). This is
merely to suggest that Allison's voice is
adequate enough to effectively carry
him through all of his own material and
some of everyone else's.
His own material was in abundant
evidence during the sets, with the best
of the new tunes, "Give It All,"
showcased during the second set. The
song was highlighted by Allison's most
impressive singing of the evening and
featured a guitar solo that would have'1
put Jimi Hendrix in natural ecstasy.
"Give It All" was just one of a num-
ber of tunes Allison performed from an'
upcoming album entitled Time. The,
new LP has already been released in
(See TOO MUCH, Page 7)

MEDIATRICS
ANNOUNCES

SATURDAY OCTOBER

25

live
by popular demand

but instead

Legendary Chicago bluesman Luther Allison kept the audience at Rick's
American Cafe entranced through three sets Wednesday night, displaying
his virtuoso guitar playing until nearly 2:30 a.m.

The Gargoyle
Punk Edition
Soon to be Sold Wher-
ever Skinny Ties and Dark
Gassed, Are Found.
Look For It Starting October 27th

The Urnversity of M chgan
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND
GUEST ARTIST SERIES

DRAP

.
spring
'awakening
by Frank Wedekind
t. 2-25, 8pm
Oct. 26, 2pm
'in the Power Center
Tickets at P.T P. Call 764-0450
MasterCharge and Visa accepted

AMA

7:30 & 9:30

'AT SC

$2.00

The Roches-
Animal Farm-A little-screened 1955 English cartoon version of George Or-
well's barnyard political fable. Should be some fun. Wednesday, October 29,
8:45, MLB 3.
Spirits of the Dead-A fascinatingly bizarre-sounding collection of three
Edgar Allen Poe stories of mystery and horror, interpreted by three major
European directors: Louis Malle, Roger Vadim and Fellini. The latter
filmmaker's segment, "Toby Dammit," is allegedly his most dazzling ac-
complishment within the last fifteen years. The cast includes Jane and Peter
Fonda, Brigette Bardot, Alain Delon and Terence Stamp. Thursday, October
30,9:30, Nat. Sci. Aud.
THEATRE
Vanities-Jack Heifner's comedy-drama traces three women from their
days together as high school cheerleaders, through college and into the
"real" world. A sensitive portrayal of growing up female. At EMU's Quirk
Theatre, October 24 and 25 at 8 p.m. and October 26 at 7 p.m.
Spring Awakening-The best student production in years, this 1891 drama is
a scathing, lusty look at the world of the adolescent. Director Jim Matin has
masterfully widened the play's vision to include issues of life and death, yet
he never leaves behind his characters' burgeoning yearnings. Generally
strong acting from heretofore little-seen actors is icing on the cake. Power
Center for the Performing Arts, tonight at 8:00 and Sunday at 2:00.

I

~

the ann arbor film cooperative

Tonight

Presents
FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT'S
THE WILD CHILD
7:00& 10:20 41R3

Tonight

WERNER HERZOG'S
EVERY MAN FOR HIMSELF AND
GOD AGAINST ALL
8:30 only MLB 3
EVERY WHICH WAY BUT LOOSE
7:00 &9:OMLB4
Starring CLINT EASTWOOD
$2 SINGLE FEATURE; $3 DOUBLE FEATURE
FRANK
LANGELLA
GLYNNIS
O'CONNOR
If you
like .IVE
theater,
you'lllove
'THOSE nooS*
LIPS,
THOSE
EYES'
On stage, Harry Crystal is sheer magic. In the
wings, Artie Shoemaker is learning his tricks.
SAT, SUN

;, i -.

The first Ann Arbor$
appearance of one of h
San Francisco's major
cultural assets.--
Edo de Wa grt, Conductor .
Sn faniC8Co
Symphony OrChetra
David Del Tredici: "Happy Voices"
Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante, K. 364
Stravinsky: Rite of Spring
eaturday October258:30
H ,2l $.,,$,$Auditortum
$12. $10.50, $9, $7, $5, limited no. at $8. I

$1.50
1:30
-:30._FRI, MON-7:30, 9:30
I R :SAT, SUN-1:20, 3:20, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30

r LE
W4

-1 2. INDIVIDUALT HEATRES
5th Ave. of liberty 761-9700

(PG)
Marty
Feldman
FRI-6:40, U
SAT, SUN-2:50,

SAT, SUN $1.50 ti 1:00
1ND94
DA T AYKROYD : 2
JOHN BE[USHI'
FRI-8:20
SAT, SUN-12:50, 4:40, 8:20

U

11

11s

U ------- U

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