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October 23, 1980 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-23

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 23, 1980-Page 11

THE SPORTING VIEWS

t

SHappiness is a championship
for fussing, feuding Phils

DEADLINE:

r

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
The Oakland A's proved it during
the early 1970's-you don't have to
be in love with your teammates and
manager to produce a champion-
ship.
Tuesday night at Veterans
Stadium in Philadelphia, the Phillies
added a chapter to this peculiar
animosity-breeds-success story.
Philadelphia, which during the past
two decades has been ridden by in-
ternal strife and constant bickering,
surprised the baseball world by win-
ning the World Series for the first
time in its 97-year history.
The triumph was surprising not
primarily because it came at the ex-
pense of the Kansas City Royals.
The Royals, a blue-eyed, har-
monious bunch, devastated the
vaunted Yankees in the American
League championship series and
were favored to defeat an exhausted
Phillie squad.
It was surprising not because a
couple of undistinguished young pit-

chers named Marty Bystrom and
Bob Walk happened to earn half of
the Phils' wins, or because jour-
neyman Del Unser emerged as one
of the hitting heroes.
Rather, thebultimate victory came
as a shock because many of: the
Phillies genuinely dislike each
other. And in sports, divisiveness is
supposed to go hand-in-hand with
failure.
Sure, all of the players were
reveling in joy yesterday during the
mammoth celebration held in down-
town Philadelphia. When you win,
it's easy to heap praise on your'
teammates, andthe Phillies laid it
on thick yesterday in front of half a
million frenetic fans.
But when things are going poorly,,
as they were during the early and
middle portions of the Phillies'
season, personal dislikes and
jealousies begin to surface. Lam-
basting one's teammates and
manager occurs a few times during
the, baseball season, but in
Philadelphia, griping and grumbling'

were the rule, not the exception.
To appreciate the degree of ten-
sion which tore at the fabric of the
Phillie organization, consider this:
Two starting outfielders, Bake Mc-
Bride and Garry Maddox,
threatened to walk off therteam
unless manager Dallas Green
treated them with respect and un-
derstanding.
McBride went so far as to declare
that if Green were to return as
manager in 1981, he would be
chasing fly balls elsewhere next
spring. Under no condition would he
play another season under Dallas
Green.
Green, the tall, taciturn manager
who was brought down from the
front office in August 1979 to serve as
"interim" manager, responded to

McBride's spouting off with charac-
teristic indifference. He said he
couldn't care less whether all 25 men
hated his guts, so long as they per-
formed well on the field.
The Phillies vented their anger not
only at their manager, but also at
first baseman Pete Rose. Rose, the
39-year-old future Hall of Famer hit
a poor (for him) .282, yet during the
regular season he received more
media attention than 24-game win-
ner Steve Carlton and major league
home run king Mike Schmidt.
When the pennant and World
Series were on the line, however, the
Phillies rose' above the discord,
disagreement, and petty jealousy.
They did something no Philadelphia
team had ever done-bring home a
baseball championship.

FOR UAC SUPERSAVING
THANKSGIVING FLIGHTS TO
NEW YORK & PHILADELPHIA
RIDAI, OCTOBER 24th
HURRY! LIMITED SEATS AVAILABLE

,.

For More Information, Inquire At UAC
Ticket Central In The Michigan Union
763-1107

K

I

Pistons fall to Sixers,
oss skein reaches 21

By MARK FISCHER
and DOUG NEARY
Special to the Daily
PONTIAC-Basketball is not only
a game of inches, but a game of feet as
well, and it was Kent Benson's feet
which got in the way of the Pistons' first
season victory last night at the Silver-
dome.
With ten seconds left in the game and
Detroit trailing 94-93, Kent Benson
ribbled the ball-and the Pistons'
hopes-off his foot and out of bounds. 4
JULIUS ERVING led the 76ers (4-2) to
victgry with 19 second-half points over
the scrappy Detroit defense, which for-
ced 27 turnovers. The Pistons also
hauled down 27 offensive rebounds, but
shot only 35 percent from the field.
Erving's missed shot with 40 seconds
left gave Detroit forward Terry Taylor
a chance to win the contest, but his 10
ot jumper with 25 seconds remaining
caromed off the rim.
But the Pistons' chances were kept
alive when the ballhawking Ron Lee
garnered the rebound. Detroit had the
ball and called time out with 16 seconds

left, setting the stage for Benson's
boner./
AS PHILADELPHIA took the ball out
to run out the clock, it seemed as if each
of the 5,279 fans in attendance was
screaming for the Pistons to foul one of
the Sikers, but the players either
wouldn't or couldn't hear them, and the
clock-along with betroit's chance for
its first victory-ticked away to
nothing.
Philly took a lead of 49-43 at the half,
and increased the margin to 58-45 early
in the third quarter behind Erving's
eight points. Philaoelphia reeled off 11
of the first 13 points of the second half
before the Pistons rallied to cut the
deficit to 78-76 entering the final stanza.

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m
iz
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ACADEMICALLY ANXIOUS???
IS YOUR LIFE ALL WORK AND NO PLAY? ASSIGN-
MENTS LATE? FEEL GUILTY WHEN NOT STUDY-
ING? TENSE??? CAN'T RELAX? CAN'T SEEM TO
MANAGE YOUR TIME? then the

TIME MANAGEMENT &
RELAXATION WORKSHOPS
offered by the HONORS COUNCIL
and COUNSELING SERVICES are for you.

Illllllll

WHEN: Wednesday, Nov. 5, 1980
5-7:00 PM
or
Wednesday, Nov. 12, 1980
5-7:00 PM
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED. For more informa-
tion and to register for one of the workshops;
call 764-8312 and ask for Anne.,

,

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[_ _____

---m----

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CONTACT LENSES
Contact Lens Special $178.50
includes exam, fitting, dispensing, follow-up visits, starter
kits, and 6 month check up.
*includes a second pair of hard lenses
Dr. Paul C. Uslan, Optometrist
545 Church Street
769-1222 by appointment
All frames 20% off with this ad
OFFER EXPIRES FRI., Oct. 31

I

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to

2
11 thru NoV"

at?

I

Save $2.39 on two
Sirloin Strip Dinners
Dinners include *Baked Potato i Warm Roll with Butter
'All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar.
ONE 01CUT OUT THIS COUPON IUE5EE CUT OUTTHIS COUPON
d S~ 2e39 Savm p229
TWO SIRLOIN TWO SIRLOIN
STRIP DINNERS .. .$5.99 STRIP DINNERS .. .$5.99
U Beverage and dessert are not M Beverage and dessert are not
included. included.
0Limit one coupon per coupleper visit. Limit one coupon per couple per visit
Cannot be used with other discounts. Cannot be used with other discounts.
Applicable taxes not included. Applicable taxes not included.
At Participating Steakhouses. At Participating Steakhouses
*Offer good U Offrgo
* c ltru jJ~t)3U Oct. 17 thru ."'!~j~

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Other ReadyTeller
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Q Administrative
Services Bldg.
(at Hoover and Greene)
l Michigan Union
El North Campus Commons
El 1940 W. Stadium Blvd.
(at Meyer's Cleaners) *

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