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September 04, 1980 - Image 91

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 4, 1980-Sec. C-10 Pages.

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A

s college towns go, Ann Arbor is a bit unusual. Its peculiarity is not
a social or political one, but a geographical one.
The campuses of large universities tend to be consciously
laid out, separated, if not isolated from their respective communities.
Western Michigan University, for example, lies on the outer edge of Kala-
mazoo, with its center several miles from that of the city. Indiana Univer-
sity, noted for its limestone-rich, beautiful campus, is virtually detatched
from its home metropolis, Bloomington.
Even those schools that are nearby their respective towns, such as the
University of Wisconsin and Michigan State University, are quite different
geographically than the Michigan-Ann Arbor relationship. Unlike
Madison and East Lansing, the business district of Ann Arbor virtually en-
compasses the University's campus. When you're walking from Angell
Hall to the Frieze Building, for example, you might find yourself browsing
through the magazine section of Border's Book Shop, or standing in line
for an ice cream cone at Jason's. When you are changing classes from the
Physics and Astronomy Building to Lorch Hall, you may likely be seduced

into a pinball game at Good Time Charley's, or some window shopping
outside The Bagpiper.
The result of this is an intimate relationship between Ann Arbor and-
University students. In a sense, the city and the University are One and the
same. The forboding student presence, therefore, is reflected in the policies
and decision making of local politicians and law enforcers, as well as the
business practices of local proprietors.
This section strives to introduce you to the city of Ann Arbor, or A'
(as it is referred to almost as often). It will attempt to familiarize you with
Ann Arborites you should know, such as the police chief and area legis-
lators, and with local restaurants and shops that are most popular among
students.
When you first arrive in town, take a long walk through the city streets
that surround campus-down South University and State Streeet near the
heart of campus, and along Main, Washington, and Liberty Streets to the
west of campus, among others. And don't forget to meet the people of
Ann Arbor along the way, for it is they who have worked to make the city
what it is today-long before your arrival.

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