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October 21, 1980 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-21

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I6

Page 10-Tuesday, October 21, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Carter, Reagan seek

TV

debate format

From AP and UPI
President Carter and Ronald Reagan
continued their long-distance debate on
foreign policy yesterday while
negotiators for both campaigns tried to
reach common ground on the format of
Begin your day
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a formal televised confrontation.
Meanwhile, polls show that the
economy may be the paramount issue
among voters next month, yet
President Carter and Ronald Reagan
have developed surprisingly similar
economic prescriptions for voters to
choose between.
MOREOVER, there is a wide consen-
sus among economists and financial
analysts that the economy, at least in
the short term, will be the same under
either Carter or Reagan as president.
That means a sluggish recovery from
the 1980 recession, with continued high
unemployment and inflation through
1982-and probably a lot longer.
The debate negotiations in late
morning with participants talking
about having urging appointments
elsewhere within an hour or so.
Three hours later the sponsoring
League of Women Voters sent out for
lunch, apparently having decided only
that there will be no vice presidential
debate.
A TOP AIDE to Vice President
Walter Mondale left the meeting,
telling reporters: "We have been very
eager to have a vice presidential
debate," but that the Republicans are
not interested.

In Youngstown, Ohio, Carter con-
tinued to attack Reagan's nuclear arms
policies, charging the Republican can-
didate with being "naive" to think the
Soviet Union would respond to in-
creased U.S. arms spending by
reaching agreement on arms control.
"It is extraordinarily naive to expect
the Soviet Union would meekly accept
what we would immediately and totally
reject," Carter said.
"IN MY JUDGEMENT that sort of
expectation-if it became the policy of
this, nation-would have the most
'serious consequences for the future. It
would be a devastating and perhaps
fatal blow to the long-term process of
nuclear arms control."
Reagan was in Ohio also, saying in
Cincinnati there is a greater danger of
nuclear war under Carter's weak
foreign policy than under his own plan
to build American military strength
before undertaking arms control.
Carter's "vacillating" foreign policy
and weakened relationships with U.S.
allies have damaged the nation's inter-
national standing, he said.
He continued to answer Carter's con-
tention that he would be a dangerous
president who would lead the nation in-
to war.

q

The Maine connectiono,
Some of the 20 tons of marijuana seized by police and Coast Guard officials yesterday lies on a piece of oceanfront property
in Stonington, Maine. Officials arrested 19 people in connection with the marijuana, worth an estimated $16 million on
the street. Other suspects are still being sought.

SUBURB SENSITIVE TO SENSUALITY:

Sex school feels the heat

Study: Birth control pill

poses 'negligi
WASHINGTON (UPI)-The final
report on a 10-year study involving
more than 16,000 women concludes the
risks from taking birth control pills ap-
pear to be negligible, at least for the

ble'

risks

young, white, middle class Americans
studied.
The report said the study provides
"additional assurance" that users of
oral contraceptives do not have an iii-
creased risk for cancers of the breast,
uterus or ovary.
And it said, "Oral contraceptive
users have no increased risk of death
from all causes combined."
But the report said the final word on
oral contraceptives is not yet in. It said
questions remain, particularly concer-
ning the association between pill use,
some conditions and personal lifestyle
habits.

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP)-A con-
troversial school where students seek
carnal consciousness and doctorates in
sensuality has moved to the inner city
to escape suburban restrictions.
The school, More University, will no
longer offer classes such as "Mutual
Pleasurable Stimulation," "Teasing"
and "Fundamentals of Sensuality" at
its 22-acre campus in posh suburban
Lafayette.
THE SCHOOL moved to a 14-room
Victorian home in downtown Oakland,
said director Dennis Morgan, to "get
out from under the injunctive cloud."
The commune, based on a philosophy
of responsible hedonism, was founded
in 1970. For years, its suburban neigh-
bors were relatively silent about naked
cavorting on the lawn.
But when the s ,ool incorporated in

1978, the Skywest Homeowners
Association persuaded Contra Costa
County to go to court.
THE COUNTY obtained an injunction
prohibiting the school from operating
without a land-use permit, but the
school remained open during appeals.
The commune will continue in
Lafayette, but sex classes are moving
to Oakland, Morgan said, adding:
"Now we're going to be able to reach
more people."
Asked how many students were
enrolled, Morgan replied, "I don't have
a clue. One hundred, 80; put down 80."
Though the school is authorized by
the state to grant undergraduate
degrees and a Ph.D. in sensuality,
Morgan said, "This is a fairly rough
place to get into, let alone matriculate.
Nobody has ever graduated or gotten a

degree ... This is not a diploma mill."
The university's most popular and
only required course is Fundamentals
of Sensuality, a two-day workshop in-
cluding a thre6-hour laboratory and an
examination of each student's "sensory
perceptions."

S

Study says
child-raising wl cs
$254,000.

@ -

MORE D.R.E.A.D.
GOLD CARD DISCOUNTS:.

NEW YORK (AP)-In a cost projec-
tion that puts all others in the shade,
Parents magazine says that parents
today will shell out $254,000 to raise a
new baby to age 18.
And that doesn't include the cost of
college, the magazine said yesterday in
its latest issue.
CURRENT federal estimates of the
cost of child-rearing come to just over
$65,000, the magazine said.
Parents magazine said inflation is the
hidden joker not included in gover-
nment estimates. But the magazine
found some of the federal figures
laughable and wondered whether the
government's estimators had children.
One figure cited was the gover-
nment's estimated $22 a week to feed a
teen-age boy; another was $115 to
clothe an infant during the first year-a
category dominated by diapers.
"Our least costly way to clothe the
baby's bottom-diaper service-comes
to $7.30 a week," wrote Thomas Tilling,
contributing editor of the magazine.
"That's $380 a year."

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